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Journal of Biological Research - Bollettino della Società Italiana di Biologia Sperimentale, 91 (suppl. 1), 2018. Abstracts of the 91th SIBS National Congress - Ancona November 9-10, 2018.

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Abstracts of oral communications and posters presented during the 91th National Congress of the Italian Society for Experimental Biology (Società Italiana di Biologia Sperimentale). Title of the congress: "The role of the Italian Society for Experimental Biology in the Italian research".
Bollettino della Società Italiana di Biologia Sperimentale
Research
Biological
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www.jbiolres.org
Volume 91/Supplement 1 - 2018
91th SIBS Congress on the role of the
Italian Society for Experimental Biology
in the Italian research
Ancona, Italy, 9-10 November 2018
ABSTRACT BOOK
Non-commercial use only
[page II] [Journal of Biological Research 2018; 91:s1]
Neville A. Marsh (Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane,
Australia)
Bruno Masala (University of Sassari, Italy)
Alejandro M.S. Mayer (Midwestern University, Downers Grove, USA)
Vincenzo Mitolo (University “Aldo Moro”, Bari, Italy)
Amir Sasan Mozaffari Nejad (Hamadan University of Medical Sciences,
Iran)
Werner E.G. Muller (Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany)
Kary B. Mullis, Children’s Hospital (Oakland Research Institute, USA)
Giuseppe Murdaca (Università degli Studi di Genova, Italy)
Giuseppe Palumbo (University Federico II, Napoli, Italy)
Gian Luigi Panattoni (University of Torino, Italy)
Massimo Pregnolato (University of Pavia, Italy)
Mark R. Rasenick (University of Illinois, Chicago, USA)
Angela Maria Rizzo (University of Milano, Italy)
Giacomo Rizzolatti (University of Parma, Italy)
Aldo Rustioni (University of North Carolina, USA)
Salvatore Sapienza (University of Catania, Italy)
Pietro Scotto Di Vettimo (University of Napoli, Italy)
Vinicio Serino (University of Siena, Italy)
Lynne Christine Weaver (University of Western Ontario, Canada)
Ming Wei (Griffith University, Australia)
Mario Wiesendanger (University of Friburg, Switzerland)
Editorial Staff
Francesca Baccino, Managing Editor
Claudia Castellano, Production Editor
Tiziano Taccini, Technical Support
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Journal of Biological Research 2018; volume 91:(s1)
Journal of Biological Research
Bollettino della Società Italiana di Biologia Sperimentale
eISSN 2284-0230
EDITORS IN CHIEF
Marco Giammanco (University of Palermo, Italy)
Gian Luigi Mariottini (University of Genova, Italy)
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Renzo Antolini (University of Trento, Italy)
Massimo Cocchi (President of SIBS, University of Bologna, Italy)
Luigi Pane (University of Genova, Italy)
Emma Rabino Massa (University of Turin, Italy)
EDITORIAL BOARD
James Anthony (Michigan State University, USA)
Saeme Asgari (Pasteur Institute, Iran)
Han Bao (MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory of Michigan State
University, USA)
Maria Grazia Bridelli (University of Parma, Italy)
Dario Cantino (University of Torino, Italy)
David Caramelli (University of Firenze, Italy)
Giuseppe Caramia (G. Salesi Hospital, Ancona, Italy)
Emilio Carbone (University of Torino, Italy)
Brunetto Chiarelli (University of Firenze, Italy)
Amelia De Lucia (University “Aldo Moro”, Bari (Italy)
Danila Di Majo, (Università degli Studi di Palermo, Italy)
Andrea Drusini (University of Padova, Italy)
Luciano Fadiga (University of Ferrara, Italy)
Vittorio Farina (University of Sassari, Italy)
William Galanter (University of Illinois, Chicago, USA)
Lorenzo Gallus (University of Genoa, Italy)
Darren Grice (Institute for Glycomics and School of Medical Science,
Griffith University, Nathan, Australia)
Stefania Grimaudo (University of Palermo, Italy)
Millie Hughes-Fulford (University of San Francisco, USA)
Gaetano Leto (Università di Palermo, Italy)
Gianni Losano (University of Torino, Italy)
Mansoor A. Malik (Howard University Hospital, Washington DC (USA)
Non-commercial use only
[Journal of Biological Research 2018; 91:s1] [page III]
Journal of Biological Research 2018; volume 91:(s1)
PRESIDENT
Massimo Cocchi (University of Bologna, Italy)
SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE
Renzo Antolini (University of Trento, Italy)
Nicola Benfante (QPP Institute, Italy)
Massimo Cocchi (University of Bologna, Italy)
Maria Grazia Bridelli (University of Parma, Italy)
Caterina Faggio (University of Messina, Italy)
Marco Giammanco (University of Palermo, Italy)
Gian Luigi Mariottini (University of Genova, Italy)
Emma Rabino Massa (University of Torino, Italy)
Luigi Pane (University of Genova, Italy)
Non-commercial use only
[page IV] [Journal of Biological Research 2018; 91:s1]
91th SIBS National Congress |Ancona, Italy, 9-10 November 2018
Partner
Non-commercial use only
[Journal of Biological Research 2018; 91:s1] [page V]
Journal of Biological Research 2018; volume 91:(s1)
91th SIBS Congress on the role of the Italian Society
for Experimental Biology in the Italian research
Ancona, Italy, 9-10 November 2018
PRESIDENT OF SIBS 2018
Giuseppe Natale Frega (Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona Italy)
ORGANIZING COMMITTEE
Massimo Cocchi (University of Bologna - QPP Institute, Italy)
Giuseppe Natale Frega (Politechnic University of Marche, Italy)
Maria Grazia Bridelli (University of Parma, Italy)
Gian Luigi Mariottini (University of Genova, Italy)
Concetta Messina (University of Palermo, Italy)
* * *
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Invited lectures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Oral Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Posters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Index of authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
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INVITED LECTURES
HOW DID TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS IMPACT
HUMAN DIFFERENTIATION AND EVOLUTION?
THE CASE OF NON-LTR RETROTRANSPOSONS
Alessio Boattini1*, Etienne Guichard1, Valentina Peona1,2,
Guidantonio Malagoli-Tagliazucchi3, Lucia Abitante1,
Evelyn Jagoda4, Margherita Musella1, Marco Ricci1,2,
Alejandro Rubio-Roldán5, Stefania Sarno1, Donata Luiselli1,
Davide Pettener1, Cristian Taccioli6, Luca Pagani7,8,
Jose Luis Garcia-Perez5,9
1University of Bologna, Department of Biological, Geological
and Environmental Sciences, Bologna, Italy; 2Department of
Evolutionary Biology (EBC), Uppsala University, Uppsala;
Sweden; 3Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Parma,
Department of Research and Innovation, Parma, Italy;
4Harvard University, Human Evolutionary Biology,
Cambridge MA, USA; 5GENYO Pfizer Universidad de
Granada Junta de Andalucía Centre for Genomics and
Oncological Research, PTS Granada, Granada, Spain;
6University of Padova, Department of Animal Medicine,
Production and Health, Legnaro (PD), Italy; 7University of
Padova, Department of Biology, Padova, Italy; 8Estonian
Biocentre, Tartu, Estonia; 9MRC Human Genetics Unit, Institute
of Genetics and Molecular Medicine (IGMM), University of
Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, UK
*E-mail: alessio.boattini2@unibo.it
Transposable Elements (TEs) are biologically important
components of eukaryote genomes and their activity generat-
ed at least 46 % of the human genome. In Anatomically
Modern Humans (AMH), only some non-LTR retrotransposons
have recently been active. These elements often contain inter-
nal promoters, Transcription Factor Binding Sites and
polyadenylation signals. They can drive adjacent gene
expression, produce alternative transcripts for existing genes
and contribute to the generation of new genes and pseudo-
genes. These characteristics make them one of the primary
sources for genomic mutations and variability. This study is
aimed at the identification of the role of such retrotrans-
posons in the differentiation and evolution of the genus
Homo, by comparing insertions in the genome of AMH
(GRCh37-hg19) with those of our closest extinct relatives,
Neanderthals and Denisovans, as well as with chimpanzees.
We analyzed reference sequences of AMH and chimps and
developed an in silico methodology for identifying species-
specific insertions using ancient DNA sequencing data.
These procedures led to the identification and confirmation of
a large number of modern-, archaic- and chimp-specific inser-
tions, the genomic loci of which have been characterized
according to different approaches: variability in human pop-
ulations, genetic and epigenetic features, selective pressures
and regulatory/expressional alteration inference. Our results
suggest that the activity of non-LTR retrotransposons through-
out Homo evolution might have played an important role in
AMH differentiation, generating new variability, influencing
recent selective events and possibly affecting the human
brain development. Further research on this topic can help
Molecular Anthropologists and Evolutionary Biologists to bet-
ter understand functional evolution of the AMH genome,
while also opening new possibilities for studies in genomics
and evolutionary dynamics. Guichard et al. (2018). Impact
of non-LTR retrotransposons in the differentiation and evolu-
tion of Anatomically Modern Humans. Mobile DNA, 9:28.
INTERACTIONS BETWEEN DIETARY POLYPHENOLS
AND RUMEN MICROBIOTA
Marcello Mele1*, Arianna Buccioni2, Andrea Serra1,
Carlo Viti2
1Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie, Alimentari, Agro-ambientali,
University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Scienze delle
Produzioni Agro-alimentari e dell’Ambiente, University of
Florence, Firenze, Italy
*E-mail: marcello.mele@unipi.it
Plant polyphenols are largely present in the plant kingdom
and, as a consequence, in the diet of ruminants. Polyphenols
may interact with rumen microbiota, which is composed by the
whole consortium of rumen microorganisms. The interaction
between dietary polyphenols and rumen microbiota may result
in changes of carbohydrates fermentation, protein degradation
and lipid metabolism. Advancing in the analysis of rumen micro-
biota allowed to increase the knowledge about the microbiota
composition as affected by dietary factors. In the present review,
the effect of plant polyphenols on rumen microbiota responsible
of unsaturated fatty acids biohydrogenation, fibre digestion and
methane production was discussed. Overall, dietary polyphe-
nols are able to perturb rumen microbiota composition, depress-
ing or modulating the biohydrogenation of dietary unsaturated
fatty acids. Large part of the literature is dedicated to the effect
of a specific class of polyphenols: tannins. The effect of tannins
on rumen microbiota largely depends to the nature of tannins
and to the amount of tannins included in the diet. Condensed
tannins have an inhibitory effect on the biohydrogenation of
unsaturated fatty acids, whereas hydrolysable tannins have a
modulatory effect on the biohydrogenation, by inducing the
accumulation of different kinds of intermediates of the biohydro-
genation process, maybe as metabolic response of bacteria to
the stress induced by tannins. As regard fibre digestion, polyphe-
nols are able to induce a depressive effect on Gram-positive
fibrolytic bacteria and ciliate protozoa. This effect results in a
reduction of volatile fatty acid production (mainly acetate).
Reduction of fibre digestion is usually associated with a reduc-
tion of methane emission. This was demonstrated for condensed
tannins, whereas the effect of hydrolysable tannins on methane
reduction is probably due to a direct interaction with rumen
microbiota without affecting dietary fibre digestion.
THE UNIT OF EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH
IN BIOANTHROPOLOGY
Emma Rabino Massa*
Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita e Biologia dei Sistemi,
Università di Torino, Torino, Italy
*E-mail: emma.rabino@unito.it
In the framework of the study program on ancient and cur-
rent human populations, the relationships between Biology
and Culture are considered with the aim to define the popula-
tion dynamics, by valorizing them as functional entities
immersed in their environment. In terms of methodology, the
study is carried out in order to demonstrate that the anthropo-
logical history of a population is the result of a complex
process whose intelligibility lies both in the biological dynam-
ics and in the social and cultural one. The peculiarity of the
project consists in the investigation of the continuity between
current and past populations through the analysis of the most
strictly biological parameters of Anthropology (genetic charac-
teristics, mitochondrial and nuclear DNA polymorphism) as
well as the social and cultural factors (biodemography, eating
behavior, living habits, migrations, state of health). To recon-
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struct the dynamics of the populations of the past, human
remains are used, which represent an important “Biological
Archive”. This material allows one to reconstruct the life condi-
tions of the past by means of the paleodemographic, paleoge-
netic, paleodietary and paleopathological studies. In the bio-
medical field, the results of the bio-anthropological researches,
by taking in consideration the factors of biological and social
transformation, may have useful consequences in order to pro-
vide indications for possible preventive interventions.
TRADITIONAL AND EMERGING POLLUTANTS
AS NEW CHALLENGES FOR MARINE ECOTOXICOLOGY:
FROM THE MOLECULE TO ECOLOGICAL RISK
ASSESSMENT
Francesco Regoli*
Department of Life and Environmental Sciences, Polytechnic
University of Marche, Ancona, Italy
*E-mail: f.regoli@staff.univpm.it
In the last 15 years the ecotoxicological approach based on
the use of bioindicator organisms has allowed to understand
mechanisms of bioaccumulation and modes of action of envi-
ronmental pollutants, highlighting how these compounds inter-
act with several cellular districts, induce the activation of detox-
ification pathways or the onset of various adverse effects.
However, challenges for the marine environment are dramati-
cally changing in the last decade both in terms of magnitude of
disturbance, typologies of hazards, but also as new scientific
and technological opportunities. Beside traditional chemicals,
emerging pollutants like pharmaceuticals, microplastics (MPs),
nanoparticles, algal toxins and new pathogens represent exam-
ples of worrying stressors for the health status of marine organ-
isms and ecosystems. Characterized by different environmental
sources and distribution pathways, these compounds have been
largely ignored for a long time, representing now a growing
concern for their widespread diffusion, the possibility to be
absorbed by several species and possible deleterious effects. At
the same time, the choice of bioindicators organisms is largely
increased, and also methodological approaches greatly
evolved, from the analysis of individual cellular responses or sin-
gle-molecule screening, to quantitative high throughput analy-
ses. We certainly changed our way to thinking ecotoxicology,
moving from the initial paradigm of the exposure-response con-
tinuum to a more dynamic situation, in which biological inputs
and normal biological functions can be modulated by compen-
satory or adaptive mechanisms. Individual components of the
toxicity response pathway have been gradually characterized
within highly complex and sophisticated network of interactions
and cascade effects. Among emerging pollutants, recent data
will be presented on the ecotoxicological potential of different
pharmaceutical compounds in the marine environment, show-
ing their accumulation in non target organisms, and the onset
of biological alterations from changes in transcriptomic profile
to potential functional alterations at cellular level. Also
microplastics pose a remarkable hazard for their huge pres-
ence in the marine environment, uptake by several species
along food webs, efficient absorption and release of different
classes of pollutants after ingestion, tissue transfer and induction
of transcriptional and cellular effects. Similarly, marine organ-
isms are experiencing the effects of global change, in particular
ocean warming and acidification: beside direct adverse effects,
such factors might influence the capability of marine organisms
to cope with multiple stressors, including anthropogenic pollu-
tion. Climate changes are also influencing the occurrence of
harmful algal blooms, biological invasions of alien species pro-
ducing toxic metabolites, and new expansion of pathogens
which had been considered as eradicated from coastal areas.
In addition to significant ecological disturbance and human
health concerns, specific ecotoxicological properties have been
detected for some bioactive compounds, which are accumulat-
ed in invertebrates and fish tissues, causing molecular and cel-
lular alterations, effects on fatty acids metabolism and reproduc-
tive potential of exposed organisms. The enhanced knowledge
on these new threats is contributing to raise public awareness
and promote new scientific or industrial initiatives. At the same
time, the ecotoxicological approach has also become a key
component of ecological risk assessment procedures and
recently included in some national environmental law.
TOWARDS ELECTROMAGNETIC MEDICINE:
ELECTRO-CONDUCTIVE PROPERTIES OF CYTOSKELETAL
PROTEIN FILAMENTS EXPOSED TO TTFIELDS
Jack A. Tuszyński1,2*
1Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
(DIMEAS), Politecnico di Torino, Torino, Italy; 2Department of
Oncology and Department of Physics, University of Alberta,
Edmonton, Canada
*E-mail: jacek.tuszynski@polito.it - jackt@ualberta.ca
We provide an overview of the modeling performed at
both atomistic and coarse-grained levels in order to gain
insight into electrostatic and electro-conductive properties of
the cytoskeleton. Computer simulations and experimental
measurements carried out for microtubules and actin filaments
are presented. Charge and dipole values for monomers and
dimers as well as polymerized forms of these proteins are
summarized. Continuum approximations for cable equations
describing actin filaments and microtubules compare favor-
ably to measurements in buffer solutions showing soliton
waves and transistor-like amplification of ionic signals. AC
Conductivity and capacitance of tubulin and microtubules
have been measured and modeled in the range of frequencies
between 100kHz and 1 MHz. A dramatic change in conduc-
tivity occurs when tubulin forms microtubules. In living cells,
this signals a conductive phase transition coinciding with mito-
sis in dividing cells. We conjecture that this process, coincid-
ing with TTField penetration into the cleavage furrow in a
dividing cell provides the most significant mechanistic expla-
nation of the observed effects. Finally, we provide estimates of
the forces, energies and power involved in the action of
TTFields on microtubules and kinesin motors. These calcula-
tions are compared and contrasted with typical values expe-
rienced at a cell level and provide strong arguments for real
physical effects of TTFields in dividing cells. We also show
results of DLS and TEM measurements on microtubules and
tubulin oligomers in solution, which allow us to quantify these
processes under controlled conditions.
91th SIBS National Congress |Ancona, Italy, 9-10 November 2018
Non-commercial use only
ORAL COMMUNICATIONS
“DRINK AND SLEEP LIKE A FISH”- GOLDFISH AS A
BEHAVIOR MODEL TO STUDY PHARMACEUTICAL
EFFECTS IN FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS
Valbona Aliko1*, Enis Mehmeti1, Mihallaq Qirjo1,
Caterina Faggio2
1Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural Sciences,
University of Tirana, Tirana, Albania; 2Department of
Chemical, Biological, Pharmaceutical and Environmental
Sciences, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
*E-mail: valbona.aliko@fshn.edu.al
Behavior is a mechanism through which organisms react to
internal and external stimuli to best cope with challenges in an
ever-changing environment. The study of animal behavior pat-
terns in response to environmental stress/threats, is relatively
new and unexplored. The aim of this study is to offer a modest
contribution in explaining the effects of pharmaceutical pollu-
tants found in freshwater ecosystems, using the behavior pat-
terns and physiology of Carassius auratus. Behavior changes
were evaluated through swimming patterns, opercular and pec-
toral response, and rheological aggressivity. Animals were
exposed for 5 weeks to water (as control), ethanol (0.25 and
1%, v/v), fluoxetine (100 µg/l) and caffeine (50 mg/l) and
their short-term responses recorded. The video was analyses
using the open-sourced software program Track3D and
EthoVision XT, which objectively quantified swimming and
social behaviors. In all treatments, fish shown significantly
(p<0.01) high level of stress, aggressivity and hyperactivity,
compared to control. It was interesting the fact that for each pol-
lutant, fish exhibited different swimming patterns, beside the
normal. These changes in the nervous system such as stressed
behavior, irregular swimming patterns, hyperactivity and
aggression, are consequences of pharmaceutical pollution in
freshwater bodies and as such they can be used as suitable
early physiological response biomarkers to environmental
stress. Monitoring of altered behavior is a great early indicator
of water pollution, which can easily be applied in the best
aquaculture and fishery practices.
TRANSITION FROM LATE LACTATION TO DRY
PERIOD CAUSED SHIFTS IN METABOLICALLY ACTIVE
RUMEN MICROBIOTA OF COWS REVEALED BY RNA
BASED AMPLICON SEQUENCING
Nida Amin*, Barbara Cardazzo, Lisa Carraro, Lucia Bailoni
Department of Comparative Biomedicine and Food Science
(BCA), University of Padua, Legnaro, Italy
*E-mail: nida.amin@phd.unipd.it
This study aimed at monitoring Italian Simmental cows dur-
ing 2 different physiological stages/dietary treatments, to
observe possible modifications in their metabolically active
rumen bacterial, archaeal and protozoal communities. Six lac-
tating cows with close days in gestation were selected for this
study. The experiment was divided into 2 collection periods:
late lactation (248-332 DIM) and dry period (2-52 days before
calving). During each period, single rumen fluid sample was
collected with an esophageal probe from each cow, fed a spe-
cific total mixed ration (TMR) at least for 14 days prior to col-
lection. RNA was extracted in duplicates and used as a tem-
plate for cDNA synthesis, that was further amplified by PCR
using gene specific primers. For bacteria and archaea, V3-V4
region of 16S rRNA genes, and for eukaryotes, V9 region of
18S rRNA genes were amplified, followed by sequencing using
300bp paired-end Illumina Miseq platform. In addition, the
total protozoa No., and motility were also recorded using com-
pound microscope. The transition from late lactation to dry peri-
od caused significant modifications in the commonly detected
rumen bacterial phyla (Bacteroidetes & Proteobacteria), proto-
zoal phyla (Ciliophora & Amoebozoa), and archaeal genera
(vadinCA11, Methanobrevibacter & Unclassified
Methanomassiliicoccaceae). In conclusion, dry period diet
increased the protozoa No., and motility, and resulted in higher
abundance of methanogenic microorganisms. This study has
potential implication for microbial programming process in
future, by controlled feeding managements in early life that per-
sist in later life, thereby reducing methanogenic microorganisms
and improving animal health and production.
GRACILARIA GRACILIS: A POWERFUL PRODUCT
FROM SUSTAINABLE AQUACULTURE
Gioele Capillo1*, Caterina Faggio1, Serena Savoca1,
Giuseppe Panarello1, Marilena Sanfilippo1,
Nunziacarla Spanò2
1Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Biologiche,
Farmaceutiche ed Ambientali (ChiBioFarAm), University of
Messina, Messina, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Scienze
Biomediche, Odontoiatriche, e delle Immagini Morfologiche
e Funzionali (Biomorf), University of Messina, Messina, Italy
*E-mail: gcapillo@unime.it
Algal species of the genus Gracilaria Greville
(Gracilariaceae, Rhodophyta) being the main source of agar
are of relevant economic importance. The increasing demand
of agar have increased and encouraged studies on different
agarophites species. Among these, one of the most interesting
in term of agar yield and quality is Gracilaria gracilis
(Stackhouse) Steentoft, Irvine & Farnham. Our study demon-
strates the various characteristics of this alga thanks to differ-
ent experiments. Growth potential of G. gracilis has been
established in natural environment using two different culture
methods: the square frames and the “reste” one. Results
showed significant differences between the two culture meth-
ods with the “reste” with higher efficiency both for Daily
Growth Rate (DGR=4.56±1.19 kg m-2) and Biomass
(Y=0.96±0.27 kg m-2), defining an innovative method for
seaweed culture. Then, the “reste” method has been used to
assess “biofiltering” potential and growth of G. gracilis in
aquaculture plant wastewater. While quite positive results
regarding growth during the experimental period have been
obtained the most interesting ones were related to reduction
of dissolved “nutrients” as NO2, NO3, NH4, PO4in water.
Finally, the exploitability of G. gracilis as potential immune-
stimulants in Danio rerio (zebrafish) feed formulation has been
established. As results upregulation of both antioxidant
enzymes gene expression (CAT and SOD) and mucosal
immune parameters (Total Ig, Total protein and ALP activity) in
fishes fed on diet supplemented with Gracilaria powder were
detected. Results obtained lead to the conclusion that G. gra-
cilis could represents a very interesting organism to be
applied in Integrated Multi Trophic Aquaculture procedures,
being product exploitable as source of agar, feed supplement
and others, derived from environmental friendly aquaculture.
CHANGES EVOKED BY THE INDUCTION OF
SYNTHETIC TORPOR ON THE GUT MICROBIOTA IN
THE RAT
Pierfrancesco Chiavetta1*, Claudia Sisa1, Timna Hitrec1,
Emiliana Piscitiello1, Agnese Stanzani1, Fabio Squarcio1,
Roberto Amici1, Silvia Turroni2, Marco Candela2,
Patrizia Brigidi2, Matteo Cerri1
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1Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences,
Physiology, Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna,
Bologna, Italy; 2Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology,
Unit of Microbial Ecology of Health, University of Bologna,
Bologna, Italy
*E-mail: pf.chiavetta@gmail.com
The ability to induce a hypothermic state, mimicking tor-
por, would bring valuable benefits in medicine (1). During this
state (called synthetic torpor) many organs undergo substan-
tial adaptation. In natural hibernators, the microbiota was
also changed both in quality and quantity. For example, the
hibernating 13 lined ground squirrel gut microbiota showed
evident alterations in Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes popula-
tions (2). Such changes may play a role in the metabolic
adaptation to hibernation (3). The aim of this study was to
assess whether such changes are also evoked by synthetic tor-
por. In this study, specific analysis on gut microbial modifica-
tions during synthetic torpor (4) was performed in several
intestinal areas. The analysis performed included phylogenet-
ic classification and inferred functional characterization.
Although in both the cecum and the feces no changes were
observed in treated animals compared to controls, interesting
data resulted from the small intestine. At a class level, in this
compartment, a strong tendency to decrease was recorded
for Bacilli, from 48% to 19% in treated animals (P=0.07), with
a corresponding increase in Clostridia, from 47% to 79%
(P=0.2). In conclusion, the state of synthetic torpor affects the
biodiversity of the microbiota in the small intestine even after
only a few hours of metabolic suppression.
References
(1) Cerri M. (2017) Annu Rev Physiol, 79:167-186.
(2) Carey et al., (2013) Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol.,
304(1):R33-42.
(3) Sommer F et al., (2016) Cell Rep, 14(7):1655-1661.
(4) Cerri, M. (2013) J Neurosci, 33(7), 2984-2993.
THE CHOLERA EPIDEMICS IN TWO MUNICIPALITIES
OF MOLISE IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Sergio De Iasio1*, Valeria Ugolini1, Alessia Orrù2,
Marilena Girotti2, Rosa Boano2
1Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, della Vita e della
Sostenibilità Ambientale, Università di Parma, Parma, Italy;
2Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita e Biologia dei Sistemi,
Università di Torino, Torino, Italy
*E-mail: sergio.deiasio@unipr.it
Epidemics and famines have been the main causes of
mortality crises in the past. In addition to changing the
demographic dimensions of the communities, they have
often disrupted the social life, developing new mentalities
and innovating behaviors, especially those related to the
mobility of individuals. In the nineteenth century the epi-
demics of plague ceased but cholera struck almost all the
european populations since 1829. The governments tried to
oppose the diffusion of the disease by adopting many pre-
cautions that intensified over time (sanitary cordons, quaran-
tine, street cleaning, prohibition of throwing waste on the
street, inspection of food, enlargement of hospitals), but the
lack of knowledge of the transmission methods of the bac-
terium limited the effects of infection containment. The
Molise study was done using death registers of civil status
and comparing the characteristics of deaths in the years of
crisis with those of previous years. All the epidemics that
struck Italy also affected Molise. Despite the establishment of
maritime sanitary cordons, deaths were more numerous in
the litoral municipalities. The most important epidemic was
the first (1837). The number of deaths doubled in many
municipalities and tripled in the coastal strip and in the
immediate hinterland; moreover they died more females
than males. Instead, in subsequent epidemics, the increase
in deaths rarely exceeded 100% and died more males than
females. The improvement in potable water network, sani-
tary services, food quality and precautions to limit the infec-
tion were the basis of the disappearance of cholera from
Molise in the early twentieth century.
NUTRITIONAL FACTORS AND MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS:
A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY
Danila Di Majo1*, Alessandra Casuccio2,
Maurizio La Guardia3, Maria Chiara Cavallo1,
Sabrina Realmuto4, Salvatore Cottone4, Marco Giammanco1
1Department of Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical
Neuroscience, Palermo, Italy; 2Department of Sciences for
Health Promotion and Mother-Child Care “G. D’Alessandro”,
Palermo, Italy; 3Department of Biological, Chemical and
Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technologies, Palermo, Italy;
4Azienda Ospedaliera, Ospedali Riuniti Villa Sofia-Cervello,
Palermo, Italy
*E-mail: danila.dimajo@unipa.it
Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating, inflammatory
and chronic Central Nervous System disease that has a sig-
nificant impact on the National Health System. Data in the
literature have shown that diet can affect the symptoms asso-
ciated with MS but it is not easy to know which foods are
useful and which are to be avoided to improve the patient's
life, as well as finding the most suitable diet regimens in the
various stages of the disease. This is a cross-sectional study
which seeks to investigate the relationships between dietary
habits, lifestyle and Expanded Disability Status Scales
(EDSS). The study involved 100 outpatients who were fol-
lowed at the MS clinic of the Villa Sofia-Cervello hospital in
Palermo, Italy. Through a structured questionnaire and med-
ical records consultation, we collected data on demograph-
ics and lifestyle including type and frequency of meals con-
sumed and physical activity practiced. In addition, the nutri-
tional status was evaluated on body mass index. The clinical
data have included MS type, number of pulse therapies and
type of pharmacological therapies, and the EDSS. Finally a
correlation between food groups, (pro-inflammatory and
anti-inflammatory), and disability index was made. The
results show that there is an inverse correlation between the
physical activity practiced (p=0.05), the degree of satisfac-
tion generated (p=0.009) and the EDSS scale. Furthermore,
there is a linear correlation between the frequency of meals
consumed and disability index (p=0.042). Finally, the con-
sumption of milk and its derivatives was significantly associ-
ated with increased levels of EDSS (p=0.008), while the
fruits and vegetables intake is associated with lower levels
of disability (p=0.05).
RESEARCH, ENVIRONMENTS AND HEALTH IN THE
MARCHE: EVIDENCE AND PROPOSALS
Mirco Fanelli*
Dipartimento di Scienze Biomolecolari, Università degli Studi
di Urbino “Carlo Bo”, Urbino, Italy
*E-mail: mirco.fanelli@uniurb.it
The Marche Region (Italy) is a territory rich in natural
resources but not without environmental criticalities that may
impact on human health. One of the most critical area is the
Site of National Interest (SIN) located adjacent to the city of
91th SIBS National Congress |Ancona, Italy, 9-10 November 2018
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Falconara Marittima and not far from other small cities.
Falconara Marittima has been the subject of at least five dif-
ferent epidemiological studies, for a total period of observa-
tion of about 20 years, which have highlighted several health
problems considering both the deaths, “the tip of the ice-
berg”, and diagnoses. Given the numerous and consistent evi-
dence of a population that is sick and dies more than the
regional average, nothing has yet emerged concerning the
possible correlation between the environmental sources of pol-
lutants with the excesses of diseases found in the territory. In
fact, if on the one hand the epidemiological investigations
have provided important observations, contributing to bring
out the state of health of the Falconara M. citizens, the same
cannot be said for the accumulated knowledge regarding
possible environmental problems (e.g. mapping pollutants
and their sources in the territory). The lack of attempts to cor-
relate the pollutants (and their sources) with the greater inci-
dence of certain diseases, determines a terrific lack of knowl-
edge that cannot provide the crucial guidelines (for the legis-
lator) for the necessary actions to be taken for a more effective
primary prevention of the diseases. The citizens of Falconara
M. have to be considered a real “biological model” to in vivo
investigate the effects of the environment on normal biological
processes and, beyond the limits of physiological adaptation,
how pathogenetic process can be induced.
CITY EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORT IN GENOA AND
TARANTO. TO IDENTIFY THE INEQUALITIES IN
MUNICIPAL GENERAL MORTALITY AND TO EARLY
DIAGNOSE ENVIRONMENTAL CAUSES
Valerio Gennaro1*, Antonello Russo2, Stefano Cervellera3,
Antonella Bruni4, Giovanni Murchio5, Emilio Gianicolo6
1UO Epidemiologia, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San
Martino, Genova, Italy; Medici per l’Ambiente, International
Society of Doctors for Environment (ISDE, Italia); 2Dottore in
Economia Aziendale, Lecce, Italy; 3PhD Statistica, Ufficio
Statistica Comune di Taranto, Collaboratore Cattedra
Demografia e Statistica Dipartimento Jonico, Università di
Bari, Bari, Italy; 4Epidemiologa, Dottoressa in Scienze
Politiche, Indirizzo Sociologico, Taranto, Italy; 5Ufficio
Informativo Comune di Genova, Genova, Italy; 6Istituto di
Fisiologia Clinica del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche
(CNR) Lecce, Italy; Institut für Medizinische Biometrie,
Epidemiologie und Informatik (IMBEI) der Universitatsmedizin-
der Johannes Gutemberg-Universität, Mainz, Germany
*E-mail: valerio.gennaro@hsanmartino.it
In addition to regularly monitoring environmental exposures
harmful to human health, we also suggest that human health
itself should be timely and periodically monitored by space-time-
age-gender epidemiological mortality studies. The “City
Epidemiological Report (CER)” of Genoa and Taranto, using
municipal administrative sources, could identify possible causes
(i.e. environmental) monitoring the overall mortality by districts
(25 and 6 districts, respectively). Descriptive analyses of the
general mortality per year, gender and district, from 2010 to
2017, adjusted according to age, were performed by using
Genoa and Taranto total mortality data. In both cities all popu-
lation and deaths data of residents due to all pathologies in the
district of the two cities, and in the regions of Liguria and Apulia
respectively, were analyzed by gender, age and year of death.
Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR) for gender and district of
residence with confidence intervals (90% CI) were calculated
using internal (municipality) and external (region) reference
population. In both cities statistically significant excesses were
confirmed for whole mortality in the general population residing
in all districts located in the areas closest to industrial plants.
Space-temporal-age-gender analysis based on overall mortality
data has allowed a reliable, timely and parsimoniously monitor-
ing the health status in each district of the two cities. Risk excess-
es were not reasonably attributable to demographic differences
(age). The integration with different data related to previous
studies and specific pathologies will help us understanding the
specific etiological factors.
GENETIC AND EPIGENETIC MODIFIERS OF NAFLD
PROGRESSION
Stefania Grimaudo*, Concetta Baiamonte, Rossella Zito,
Rosaria Maria Pipitone
Università degli Studi di Palermo, Dipartimento Biomedico di
Medicina Interna e Specialistica, Palermo, Italy
*E-mail: stefania.grimaudo@unipa.it
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), actually recog-
nized as the most common liver disease worldwide, repre-
sents the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, being
closely related to obesity, insulin resistance and oxidative
stress. It includes a spectrum of conditions ranging from sim-
ple steatosis, characterized by hepatic fat accumulation with
or without inflammation, to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis
(NASH), defined by hepatic fat deposition with hepatocellular
damage, inflammation and fibrosis. NAFLD is a complex dis-
ease where the interactions between the environment and the
polygenic host background are able to determine disease
phenotype and influence its progression. Recently, a lot of
genome-wide association and large candidate gene studies
have enriched our understanding of the genetic basis of
NAFLD, which is useful to explain the substantial inter-patient
variation in disease progression. The rs738409 C>G
PNPLA3 variant, involved in lipid droplets remodeling, repre-
sents the major common genetic determinant of NAFLD, driv-
ing a normal liver to steatosis, NASH and cirrhosis. However,
other gene variants involved in VLDL secretion (TM6SF2,
APOB), de novo lipogenesis regulation (GCKR), mitochondri-
al lipid metabolism OxPhos (UCP2), phospholipid metabolism
(MBOAT7) innate immunity (IL28B, MERTK) and hepatic stel-
late cells activation (MERTK, Irisin) have been implicated in
the occurrence and/or the NAFLD progression. Nowadays
the role of epigenetic modifications, DNA methylation and
chromatin remodeling, on NAFLD progression is emerging.
Finally, MicroRNAs, regulators of gene expression, commonly
deregulated in pathological conditions, are currently the most
intensely studied epigenetic factors in NAFLD (miR-122).
Therefore, epigenetic changes interact with inherited risk fac-
tors to determine an individual’s susceptibility to NAFLD.
COMPUTATIONAL AND IN VITRO STUDIES OF SYK
INHIBITORS AS NEW DRUGS IN P. FALCIPARUM
MALARIA
Giuseppe Marchetti1*, Alessandro Dessì2,
Roberto Dallocchio2, Ioannis Tsamesidis1, Cristina D’Avino1,
Elisabetta Avitabile1, Antonella Pantaleo1
1Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sassari,
Sassari, Italy; 2National Research Council (CNR) Institute of
Biomolecular Chemistry, Sassari, Italy
*E-mail: gmarchetti@uniss.it
Malaria remains one of the most devastating infectious dis-
eases. Although the current therapies are working well, the
WHO recommends Artemisinin Combination Therapies (ACTs)
as the frontline treatments against P. falciparum malaria to limit
the artemisinin resistance. In 2017 it has been confirmed in 5
countries of the Greater Mekong subregion. An alternative way
to fight the parasite resistance could be use Syk inhibitors as new
antimalarial drugs. Syk protein is present in human erythrocytes;
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its activation by oxidant stress involves the band 3 (AE1) mem-
brane protein. Tyr phosphorylation (AE1) occurs during P. falci-
parum growth leading to the release of microparticles containing
hemichromes and RBCs structural weakening. Syk inhibitors
block these events interacting with protein catalytic site. We have
performed in vitro and in silico studies and compared the
obtained results. In vitro we treated parasitized erythrocytes with
different concentrations of Syk inhibitors and we evaluate the Tyr
phosphorylation levels in Band 3 residues by proteomic analy-
sis. In presence of Syk inhibitors we observed a marked
decrease of band 3 phosphorylation according to drug concen-
tration increase. The proteomic data trend relating to the inhibi-
tion values IC50 correspond to the computational studies. In silico
studies were based on different approaches of molecular model-
ing aimed to deepen the knowledge about the ligand-protein
interaction in order to obtain the highest efficacy in vitro. This
study allow to optimize the structure of these compounds and to
design and discover new promising antimalarial drugs.
PRELIMINARY DATA ON THE MODULATORY EFFECTS
OF DIFFERENT PLANT EXTRACTS ON JELLYFISH
VENOM
Gian Luigi Mariottini1*, Laura Cornara1,2, Paolo Giordani3,
Antonella Smeriglio4, Domenico Trombetta4,
Lucrezia Guida5, Silvia Lavorano6, Bruno Burlando2,3
1Department of Earth, Environment and Life Sciences (DISTAV),
University of Genova, Genova, Italy; 2Biophysics Institute,
National Research Council (CNR), Genova, Italy;
3Department of Pharmacy (DIFAR), University of Genova,
Genova, Italy; 4Department of Chemical, Biological,
Pharmaceutical and Environmental Sciences, University of
Messina, Messina, Italy; 5Department of Experimental
Medicine (DIMES), Section of Biochemistry, University of
Genova, Genova, Italy; 6Acquario di Genova, Area Porto
Antico, Ponte Spinola, Genova, Italy
*E-mail: Gian.Luigi.Mariottini@unige.it
Jellyfish are toxic sea organisms representing a health
issue for both recreational and occupational activities. Given
that herbal products are attracting increasing interest, we
examined plant extracts from Carica papaya L., Ananas
comosus (L.) Merr., and Bouvardia ternifolia (Cav.) Schltdl.,
known for protective properties against different animal ven-
oms. The interference of these extracts with the toxicity of tis-
sue homogenates from the jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca,
Phyllorhiza punctata, and Cassiopea andromeda, were eval-
uated on L929 mouse fibroblasts, used as an in vitro skin cell
model. The quantification of jellyfish cytotoxicity was
achieved by MTT cell viability assays, deriving dose response
curves and IC50 values. Each of the extracts of C. papaya and
A. comosus significantly lowered the cytotoxicity of P. noctilu-
ca and P. punctata, but enhanced the toxic effect of C.
andromeda. The extract of B. ternifolia reduced P. punctate
cytotoxicity, showed no effect against P. noctiluca, and
increased C. andromeda cytotoxicity. In summary, the modu-
latory effects of plant extracts on jellyfish homogenates cyto-
toxicity resulted to be species-specific, showing either protec-
tive or worsening effects. More specifically, extracts with pro-
tease activities, like A. comosus and C. papaya, seem to pro-
tect from jellyfish with toxic peptides like phospholipase A.
EXTREMOPHILES ORGANISMS AS VALUABLE
SOURCE OF RADICAL SCAVENGERS: APPLICATIONS
IN THE BLUE-BIOTECHNOLOGIES
Concetta M. Messina1*, Massimo Cocchi2,
Andrea Santulli1,3
1University of Palermo, Department of Earth and Sea Science,
Laboratory of Marine Biochemistry and Ecotoxicology, Trapani,
Italy; 2University of Bologna, Department of Veterinary
Sciences, Bologna, Italy; 3Consorzio Universitario della
Provincia di Trapani, Marine Biology Institute, Trapani, Italy
*E-mail: concetta.messina@unipa.it
A significant contribution to the discovery of new bioactive
molecules was given by the study of species that have adapted
to live in extreme environments, such as acidophilous organ-
isms, halophilic, cryophilic and thermophilic. These are microor-
ganisms that have developed unique physiological characteris-
tics, which allow them to survive extreme physical and chemical
conditions, such as high temperatures, high salt concentrations
or extreme pH levels and therefore, can adapt itself and can
proliferate in environments recognized as inhospitable to life.
This is possible, because they are specialized to produce, in a
modulated way, molecules that allow them to adapt to changes
in the chemical-physical conditions of the environment. A large
part of these microorganisms belongs to the domain of the
Archea, ancestral bacteria that represent a considerable frac-
tion of the prokaryotic world in terrestrial and marine ecosys-
tems; their unusual properties make them a potentially valuable
resource in the development of new biotechnological processes
and industrial applications such as new pharmaceuticals, cos-
metics, food supplements, molecular probes and enzymes.
HYPERGLYCEMIA AFFECTS ANION EXCHANGE
THROUGH BAND 3 PROTEIN: AN IN VITRO AND
IN VIVO STUDY ON HUMAN ERYTHROCYTES
Rossana Morabito1*, Alessia Remigante1,2, Saverio Loddo3,
Vincenzo Trichilo3, Silvia Dossena2, Angela Marino1
1Department of Chemical, Biological, Pharmaceutical and
Environmental Sciences, University of Messina, Messina, Italy;
2Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Paracelsus
Medical University, Salzburg, Austria; 3Department of Clinical
and Experimental Medicine, AOU Policlinico Universitario G.
Martino, Messina, Italy
*E-mail: rmorabito@unime.it
Band 3 protein (B3p) accounts for erythrocytes homeosta-
sis, namely ion balance, gas exchange and membrane
deformability. In the present investigation, the effect of hyper-
glycemia, related to metabolic dysfunctions, has been evalu-
ated on erythrocytes in vitro exposed to increasing concentra-
tions of glucose (5-15-35-50 mM) for different time intervals
(3-24 h) as well as on erythrocytes from patients with high gly-
cated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. The rate constant for
SO4=uptake, accounting for the efficiency of anion exchange
through B3p, along with levels of MDA, GSH, -membrane
SH groups and osmotic fragility have been measured. The
incubation with high glucose concentrations (15-35 mM) for
24 h exacerbated osmotic fragility, compromising the meas-
urement of anion exchange through B3p. When erythrocytes
were exposed to high glucose for 3 h, being MDA, GSH and
membrane –SH levels unchanged, SO4=trapped by the cells
was significantly reduced with respect to control (5 mM).
Under high HbA1c levels, the rate constant was higher than
control and SO4=content higher than both control and high
glucose-treated erythrocytes. The present findings show that:
i) measurement of the rate constant for SO4=uptake is a suit-
able tool to monitor the effect of hyperglycemia on erythro-
cytes; ii) hyperglycemia due to high glucose applied for 3 h
affects anion exchange capability without producing lipid per-
oxidation; iii) high HbA1c levels seem to accelerate anion
exchange capability through B3p. Future studies will evaluate
whether this acceleration depends on an altered Bp3 confor-
mation, affecting crosslink with Hb, or on altered phospho-
rylative signaling underlying B3p function.
91th SIBS National Congress |Ancona, Italy, 9-10 November 2018
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MEDIEVAL BURIALS IN THE CATHEDRAL OF ALBA (CN):
PALEODEMOGRAPHIC REVIEW AND UPDATES
Alessia Orrù1*, Alessandra Cinti1, Sergio De Iasio2,
Marilena Girotti1, Maurizio Brizzi3, Ezio Fulcheri4,
Rosa Boano1
1Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita e Biologia dei Sistemi,
Università di Torino, Torino, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Scienze
Chimiche, della Vita e della Sostenibilità Ambientale,
Università di Parma, Parma, Italy; 3Dipartimento di Scienze
Statistiche “Paolo Fortunati”, Università di Bologna, Bologna,
Italy; 4Dipartimento di Scienze Chirurgiche e Diagnostiche
integrate, Università di Genova, Genova, Italy
*E-mail: aorru@unito.it
During the archaeological excavations carried out from
2007 to 2011 in the Cathedral of Alba (Cuneo, North Italy),
377 human skeletal remains, dating back from the 8th to the
17th century, were exhumed. At the present, anthropological
and paleopathological study was conducted on 302 individu-
als, according to morphological and metrical standard criteria
provided in human osteological manual and paleopathology lit-
erature. In order to outline the biological and paleodemograph-
ic profile, sex, age at the death, stature, biomechanical stress
and pathological conditions are described. The anthropological
analyses reflected that 74 skeletons (24%) were non-adults,
228 (76%) adults; moreover, 109 individuals (48%) were iden-
tified as male, 62 (27%) female, and 57 (25%) unsexed, due
to poor preservation. In our research program, we have tested
the performance of statistics approach in sex estimation based
on the metric observations on the long bones. We discuss the
results obtained from applying statistical method in the group of
unsexed adults.
IMPORTANCE OF MUSSEL DIGESTIVE CELLS
IN ECOTOXICOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS ON
XENOBIOTICS
Maria Pagano1*, Alžběta Stará1,2, Caterina Faggio1
1Department of Chemical, Biological, Pharmaceutical and
Environmental Sciences, University of Messina, Messina, Italy;
2Faculty of Fisheries and Protection of Waters, South
Bohemian Research Centre of Aquaculture and Biodiversity of
Hydrocenoses, University of South Bohemia in eské
Bud jovice, Vod any, Czech Republic
E-mail: mariapagano88@gmail.com
Water environments, in particular coastal marine areas,
brackish ecosystems and inland waters are subject to a strong
impact linked to human activities. Heavy metals, radioactive
pollutants and different xenobiotics can cause long-term
adverse effects in the ecosystem. To control the well-being of
these environments, the main control strategies involve the use
of organisms that tolerate the presence of external pollutants
and through molecular investigations on specific tissues. The
most commonly used sentinel organisms are molluscs of the
genus Mytilus. The target tissues in these organisms are gills,
hemolymph and hepatopancreas. In recent years, hepatopan-
creas has been used as a good indicator for conventional pol-
lutants, such as heavy metals, present in ecosystems. Digestive
cells are excellent biomarkers, in fact cytotoxic, genotoxic
and oxidative stresses alter the normal metabolic processes
that can be easily identified. Changes in metabolic processes
such as changes in antioxidant enzymes, are also indicative
of the damage caused by emerging pollutants, by xenobiotics
such as drugs, body care products, biocides, nanoparticles
and microplastics, which released in small concentrations in
the environment cause a chronic damage in mussels3. In
addition, to the obvious environmental damage linked to
these xenobiotics, the direct risk to humans through the food
chain should not be underestimated. Therefore, the impor-
tance of using this organ in the current environmental investi-
gations on biomonitoring became important.
ROLE OF O-GLCNACYLATION IN THE REGULATION
OF CELLULAR VOLUME
Alessia Remigante1,2*, Rossana Morabito2,
Emanuele Bernardinelli1, Tamas Nagy3, Angela Marino2,
Silvia Dossena1
1Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Paracelsus
Medizinische Privatuniversität, Salzburg, Austria; 2Department
of Chemical, Biological, Pharmaceutical and Environmental
Sciences, University of Messina, Messina, Italy; 3Department of
Laboratory Medicine, Medical School, University of Pécs, Pécs,
Hungary
*E-mail: alessia.remigante@pmu.ac.at
O-GlcNAcylation (O-GlcNAc) is a post-translational modifi-
cation of proteins and occurs via conjugation of N-acetylglu-
cosamine to serine/threonine residues. It is well established that
O-GlcNAc is chronically elevated in diabetes mellitus, but the
pathophysiological significance of this finding is not fully eluci-
dated. Recently, the protein ICln, crucial in the activation of a
chloride conductance (IClswell) after anisosmotic cell swelling,
has been found to be O-GlcNacylated. Nuclear magnetic reso-
nance and bioinformatics show multiple O-GlcNAc modifica-
tion sites, of which the functional roles are unknown. To explore
the functional significance of O-GlcNAc modification of ICln,
the wild type and different mutant forms of ICln have been char-
acterized by patch clamp in the presence of normal or elevated
O-GlcNAc levels. Our results show that: I) O-GlcNAc elevation
suppresses IClswell and inhibits ICln function; II) IClnS67A is func-
tional but insensitive to O-GlcNAc elevation; III) IClnS67T func-
tion is lower compared to the wild type, and was not sup-
pressed further by O-GlcNAc elevation; IV) IClnT223A is func-
tional and sensitive to O-GlcNAc elevation; V) IClnS193X lost
most of its activity, though the residual current was sensitive to
O-GlcNAc elevation. Together, these results clearly show that
O-GlcNacylation of ICln at S67 leads to IClswell suppression.
Abnormally O-GlcNacylated proteins involved in the regulation
of cellular volume may contribute to the onset and progression
of diabetic complications and may therefore represent novel tar-
gets in the prevention or treatment of these conditions.
THE AGRICULTURAL ECOSYSTEM SERVICE:
RESILIENCE AND ECOSYSTEM TIMELINE
Sara Sozzo1*, Edoardo Cecconello2, Marcello Valente3,
Paola Maria Chiavazza4
1Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University
of Turin, Torino, Italy; 2Department of Agronomy, Universidad
De Oriente, Anzoátegui; Venezuela; 3Centro Interateneo
Formazione Insegnanti, CIFIS, University of Turin, Torino, Italy;
4Department of Agricultural, Forest and Food Sciences,
University of Turin, Torino, Italy
*E-mail: sara.sozzo@unito.it
Resilience is one of the most fascinating concepts regarding
sustainability, and mainly in the study of ecosystem services.
Resilience in the study of ecosystem services requires a very
crosscutting approach, because it concerns complex systems
such as ecosystems and human social systems. Agricultural
areas are fundamental components of sustainability; ecosystem
services can provide links to integrate management and gover-
nance practices in the search for transitions towards greater sus-
tainability in rural areas. The study concerns a micro-area in the
province of Asti, using some typical tools of resilience and
ecosystem services, trying to find a new methodological
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91th SIBS National Congress |Ancona, Italy, 9-10 November 2018
approach. Without any better interconnection among research
and related policy, technology might not have an impact on the
real-world practical application. Indeed, every time the
researchers will begin their search without focusing on how the
data may be used, the final evaluation it fails to develop a new
policy, which might be adapted to the new challenges. Whilst
in the real politics, the under-estimation of the ecological studies
leads to a significant environmental decline. A common
approach should measure the ecosystem condition, according
to a natural status comparable threshold values, in other words,
on the basis of its similarity to a man-made environment least-
impacted. However, Pristine agro-ecosystem concept is not
credible nor does it provide an appropriate frame. Concerns
that the pristine agro-ecosystem concept is not credible or that
information provided is dubious may also dissuade the use. This
article, is intentionally written in simple language, because the
complexity can be explained only simply.
SOCIETY AND ECONOMY BETWEEN THE 17TH
AND 18TH CENTURY THROUGH SOME
PALEOPATHOLOGICAL INDICATORS: THE CASE OF
THE MUMMIES OF ROCCAPELAGO (MO)
Mirko Traversari1*, Eugenio Bortolini1, Stefano Benazzi1,2
1Laboratories of Physical Anthropology and Ancient DNA,
Department of Cultural Heritage, University of Bologna,
Ravenna, Italy; 2Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck
Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
*E-mail: mirko.traversari2@unibo.it
During the restoration of the church of the Conversion of
St. Paul, located in Roccapelago, a village of the Emilian
Apennines (Northen Italy), a chamber was found containing
the remains of over 400 individuals who had lived between
the 17th and 18th century AD. Some of them were naturally
mummified. Mummification was possible due to the particular
location of the crypt, which was built on the ruins of the
medieval fortress of Roccapelago and was therefore
equipped with ventilation slots. Thanks to the stratigraphy of
the site and to the secure dating of the layers, it was possible
to investigate the development of certain phenomena from the
17th to the 18th century. The aim of this study is to better under-
stand the possible social changes underlying the development
of some pathological characters in the ancient population of
Roccapelago during the available temporal interval. The
social structure of the community of Roccapelago, during
these two centuries, remains substantially the same.
Anthropological analysis seems to highlight an initial phase of
change in the food and occupational aspects, which perhaps
going to consolidate during the 19th century.The prevalence
of tibial periostitis remains stable, the study of clothes has in
fact shown that there is no variation in the type of clothing
used during the 17th and 18th centuries. The stability of the
aspects considered, could be related to the persistence of the
same activities in the sylvan environment and the same meth-
ods of protection of the legs by means of inadequate clothing.
MECHANISM OF SYNERGIC INTERACTION OF SYK
INHIBITORS ON ANTIMALARIAL ARTEMISININ
ACTIVITY
Ioannis Tsamesidis1, Karine Reybier2, Giuseppe Marchetti1,
Claudio Fozza3, Cristina D’Avino1, Francoise Nepveu2,
Francesco Turrini4, Antonella Pantaleo1
1Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sassari,
Sassari, Italy; 2UMR 152 Pharma-Dev, Université de Toulouse,
IRD, UPS, Toulouse, France; 3Department of Clinical and
Experimental Medicine, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy;
4Department of Oncology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy
*E-mail: johntsame@gmail.com
Artemisinin derivatives constitutes the major components of
all antimalarial therapies. Although the mechanism of action of
artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT’s) are still debat-
ed and unfortunately, in the Greater Mekong Subregion, the
efficacy of ACT’s has recently been questioned by resistance to
both artemisinin derivatives and to the partner drugs. Therefore,
the quest for new antimalarials that can be combined with an
artemisinin to prevent the spread of drug resistance has height-
ened. We previously demonstrated that Syk kinase inhibitors
block the phosphorylation of band 3, thereby interfering with
the release of hemichromes and heme-enriched microvesicles.
Those modifications are an essential prerequisite for parasite
egression from the host cell constituting the theoretical back-
ground of the observed anti-plasmodial activity of Syk
inhibitors. In the present study, we describe a marked, synergis-
tic effect between Syk inhibitors and artemisinins. This synergis-
tic effect appear to be causally related to the accumulation of
hemichromes in parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs) and to their
capacity to catalyze the activation of artemisinins.
Non-commercial use only
POSTERS
LANGERHANS CELLS, MORPHOLOGICAL AND
IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION
IN STRIPED DOLPHIN (STENELLA COERULEOALBA)
EPIDERMIS
Marialuisa Aragona*, Gioele Capillo, Carol Magazzù,
Simona Pergolizzi, Eugenia Rita Lauriano
Department of Chemical, Biological, Pharmaceutical and
Environmental Sciences, University of Messina, S. Agata
Messina (ME), Italy
*E-mail: m.luisa.aragona@gmail.com
The skin is the primary interface between the body and the
environment, and has a central role in host defence.
Langerhans cells (LCs), play a central role within inflammatory
and immune responses in the epidermis of terrestrial and aquat-
ic mammals, through their specialized function in antigen cap-
ture. Langerin/CD207 is a cell surface receptor of Langerhans
cells (LC) and represents a key molecule to mark LCs [1, 2]. The
aim of this study was to characterize immunohistochemically
with anti langerin/CD207antibody, Langerhans cell in the dol-
phin Stenella coeruleoalba epidermis. An adult male striped
dolphin, was found live stranded (length: 197 cm), on April
2011 in the Apulian coast (Adriatic Sea). The samples obtained
were treated in accordance with protocol for optical
microscopy. Some serial sections were stained with hematoxylin
and eosin (H&E), [3]; for immunofluorescence investigation,
serial sections were treated with langerin/CD207 antibody. In
this study, the immunoreactivity of Langerin/CD207 antibody,
revealed numerous Langerhans cells (LCs) with a polyhedral
shape, located in the epidermal suprabasal layer (stratum spin-
osum). These cells present an irregular shape with long cyto-
plasmic processes extending among keratinocytes, forming a
delicate network. Future studies will be aimed to characterize
different dendritic cells populations present in the dolphin’s skin.
References
1. Valladeau, J., et al., Langerin, a novel C-type lectin specific to
Langerhans cells, is an endocytic receptor that induces the forma-
tion of Birbeck granules. Immunity, 2000. 12(1): p. 71-81.
2. Merad, M., F. Ginhoux, and M. Collin, Origin, homeostasis and
function of Langerhans cells and other langerin-expressing dendritic
cells. Nature Reviews Immunology, 2008. 8(12): p. 935-947.
3. Lauriano, E., et al., Immunohistochemical characterization of epi-
dermal dendritic-like cells in giant mudskipper, Periophthalmodon
schlosseri. Fish & Shellfish Immunology, 2018.
MOLECULAR DYNAMICS AND UV SPECTROSCOPY
TO INVESTIGATE COLLAGEN FIBRILLOGENESIS
Maria Grazia Bridelli*, Ludovica Leo, Eugenia Polverini
Department of Mathematical, Physical and Computational
Sciences, University of Parma, Parma, Italy
*E-mail: mariagrazia.bridelli@unipr.it
Collagen is a fibrous protein representing the main con-
stituent of connective tissue in mammals, with a basic structural
unit called tropocollagen. Tropocollagen is a triple right-handed
helix consisting of Gly-Xaa-Yaa repetitions, in which one-thirds of
the X and Y residues are either prolines or hydroxyprolines (Hyp).
Collagen triple helices associate in fibrils, and the alignment of
them yields to the characteristic fibres, where tropocollagen mol-
ecules are staggered side-by-side with a shift of 234 residues
between two neighbours tropocollagens. MD simulations were
performed to study tropocollagen aggregation in physiological
conditions. Two tropocollagen fragments with different hydro-
pathic profiles were chosen and built from Rattus norvegicus type
I collagen sequence. Other fragments were selected from the
same sequence with a shift of 234 residues upstream and down-
stream of it. Association of two, three and four fragments in MD
simulations shows that the amino-acidic composition of the triple
helices strongly influences the assembly propensity. Fragments
rich in charged residues needs a lateral addition of individual
tropocollagens to self-assembly, while poorly charged segments
easily associate in pairs. This behaviour suggests a cooperative
binding mechanism at tropocollagen level. Rat tail tendon colla-
gen was prepared at low temperature and at different pH. In
vitro collagen self-assembly was monitored by measuring the tur-
bidity changes of the solution as observed from the increase in
absorbance at 310 nm. Curves of aggregate fractions vs time
display a sigmoid profile, composed by three defined regions
(lag, growth, plateau) indicating, according with literature, a
cooperative process with a very short lag phase.
EFFECTS OF MIXTURE OF ATRAZINE,
DESISOPROPYLATRAZINE AND DESETHYLATRAZINE
ON DEVELOPMENT OF EARLY LIFE STAGES
OF ZEBRAFISH (DANIO RERIO)
Claudia Cocilovo1*, Jana Blahova2, Lucie Plhalova2,
Zdenka Svobodova2, Caterina Faggio1
1Department of Chemical, Biological, Pharmaceutical and
Environmental Sciences, University of Messina, Italy;
2Department of Animal Protection, Welfare and Ethology,
University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno,
Czech Republic
*E-mail: claudia.cocilovo@gmail.com
Atrazine is one type of chloro-s-triazine herbicides and it is
considered moderately toxic to aquatic animals. The aim of this
study was to assess the acute embryotoxicity of a mixture of
atrazine and two of its metabolites, desisopropylatrazine and
desethylatrazine. As a model organism we used zebrafish
(Danio rerio), which belong to one of the model fish organisms
commonly used in toxicity tests to determine negative effects of
various substances occurring in aquatic ecosystem. Toxic effects
of were studied using evaluation of lethal endpoints, develop-
ment disorder, and other sublethal endpoints such as hatching
rate, formation of somites, and development of eyes, sponta-
neous movement, heartbeat, blood circulation, pigmentation, or
edema at 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours post fertilization. The
embryonal toxicity test was performed through the modified
method of Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity (FET) Test (OECD guide-
line 236). Newly fertilized zebrafish eggs were exposed to var-
ious concentrations of a mixture, which include environmental
levels in aquatic environment and multiples of environmental rel-
evant concentration to find out if the negative effect is dose
dependent. Our results showed that hight concentrations of
these compounds cause significant changes in development
after 48 hours post fertilization.
NEW SILVER NANOPARTICLES DEVELOPMENT
STARTING FROM THE EXTRACT OF ARTEMISIA
ANNUA: GREEN SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION
AND ANTI-MALARIAL ACTIVITY
Cristina D’Avino1*, Elisabetta Avitabile1,
Ioannis Tsamesidis1, Giuseppe Marchetti1,
Serenella Medici2, Antonella Pantaleo1
[Journal of Biological Research 2018; 91:s1] [page 9]
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[page 10] [Journal of Biological Research 2018; 91:s1]
1Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sassari,
Italy; 2Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of
Sassari, Sassari, Italy
*E-mail: cristinadavino@gmail.com
Among the metallic nanoparticles, interesting for their
chemical stability, good conductivity and good biological
activity, cover a primary role the silver nanoparticles. Their
ability antibacterial, antifungal and antiparasitical it is
already note in literature. In the last few years, the attention
has been focused on the green synthesis of the nanoparticles
to increase their biocompatibility in biological use. Following
this tendency we have synthesized some silver nanoparticles
using extracts of Artemisia annua and evaluated their possible
use as antimalarial agents. Treating infected RBCs with this
AgNPs no hemolytic effect was observed. Their TEM
microscopy characterization displayed a homogenous size
distribution in the range of 10-30 nm, useful for biomedical
applications. Our in vitro test proves increased efficacy of A.
annua AgNps in comparison to silver nanoparticles synthe-
sized with classical chemical method. Preliminary results show
that A. annua AgNPs has a marked antimalarial effect on P.
falciparum culture. All the experiments have been carried out
under different dose response conditions. Considering the
results obtained, it emerges that the potential of A. annua-
AgNPs could be used as a novel nanotechnological strategy
for malarial treatment.
BETA-ESTRADIOL AND ETHINYL-ESTRADIOL EFFECTS
ON FEMALE HEMORHEOLOGY
Emma Fiorino1*, Paulo L. Faber2, Teresa Freitas3,
Carlota Saldanha3, Caterina Faggio1,
Ana Santos Silva-Herdade3
1Department of Chemical, Biological, Pharmaceutical and
Environmental Sciences, University of Messina, Italy; 2Hospital
da Luz, Aveiro, Portugal; 3Instituto de Medicina Molecular,
Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal
*E-mail: emma.fiorino@studenti.unime.it
Estrogens are the primary female sex hormones. Among
these, estradiol carries out the most powerful action. Estrogens
are also the responsible for secondary sexual characteristics in
women and affect the function of all major organ systems within
the body [1]. It is also well-known that an estrogen-deficient
state led to neurovascular and cardiovascular diseases [2]. In
contrast, synthetic estrogens, like the ones used in oral contra-
ceptives or hormonal replacement therapies, are associated
with thrombosis and some other vascular diseases [3]. The aim
of this study was to investigate the effects, in women, of β-estra-
diol and ethinyl-estradiol on some hemorheological parameters
like blood viscosity, RBC aggregation and RBC deformability.
The study was performed in accordance with the guidelines for
hemorheological laboratory techniques and under the protocol
established with the Portuguese Institute of Blood and
Transplantation in Lisbon, Portugal. All donors were females
and duly informed and signed their agreement. Blood aliquots
were gently mixed and incubated with different beta-estradiol
and ethinyl-estradiol concentrations, and RBC aggregation,
RBC deformability and blood viscosity were assessed. The con-
centrations of β-estradiol tested were 50 g, 100 g, 150 g,
200 g and of ethinyl-estradiol were 25 g, 50 g, 75 g, 100 g.
In our experiments, we observed a significant increase of the
EEI for both compounds for some shear stress values. No signif-
icant differences in RBC aggregation and blood viscosity were
found. These findings may be correlated with different patterns
of thrombotic and cardiovascular effects in different phases of
the menstrual cycle or different dosages of oral contraceptive
therapy used by some of the donors.
References
1. Hall, G. and T.J. Phillips, Estrogen and skin: The effects of estro-
gen, menopause, and hormone replacement therapy on the skin.
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 2005. 53(4):
p. 555-568.
2. Persky, A.M., et al., Protective Effect of Estrogens Against
Oxidative Damage to Heart and Skeletal Muscle In Vivo and In
Vitro (44463). Proceedings of the Society for Experimental
Biology and Medicine, 2000. 223(1): p. 59-66.
3. Stegeman, B.H., et al., Different combined oral contraceptives
and the risk of venous thrombosis: systematic review and network
meta-analysis. Bmj, 2013. 347: p. f5298.
ROLE OF 3,5-DIIODO-L-THYRONINE ON THE
PITUITARY-THYROID AXIS
Marco Giammanco1,2*, Angela Marino3,
Maurizio La Guardia4, Danila Di Majo1
1Department of Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical
Neurosciences, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy;
2Research Unit in Endocrinology - Italian Society of
Experimental Biology, Italy; 3Department of Chemical,
Biological, Pharmaceutical and Environmental Sciences,
University of Messina, Messina, Italy; 4Department of
Biological, Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences and
Technologies, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy
*E-mail: marco.giammanco@unipa.it
Studies have highlighted that the administration of 3,5-diio-
do-L-thyronine to rats fed diets rich in lipids induces a decrease
of cholesterol and triglycerides plasma levels and body weight
without inducing liver steatosis. On the basis of these observa-
tions we carried out some experimental in vivo studies to assess
the effects of multiple high doses of T2 on the pituitary thyroid
axis of rats fed diet rich in lipids. Fifteen male Wistar rats were
divided into three groups of five animals each. The first group
(N group) received standard diet, the second group was fed
with a high fat diet (HFD group) while the third group (HFDT2
group), was additionally given with T2 intraperitoneally at a
dose level of 70 g/100 gof body weight three time a week
up to four weeks. At the end of the treatment period blood sam-
ple from each animal was collected, centrifuged and the result-
ant serum was stored at -20°C. The serum concentrations of
TSH, T3, T4, ACTH, triglycerides, cholesterol, glucose, alanine
aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phos-
phatase were then determined at various intervals. In addition,
liver of rats was examined by histology order to assess the pres-
ence and degree of steatosis. The administration of T2 to rats
fed with a high fat diet suppressed TSH secretion (p=0.013)
while no steatosis was observed in the liver of these animals.
These preliminary data show that multiple administration of
high doses of T2 to rats fed diets rich in lipid inhibits TSH secre-
tion and prevents the onset of liver steatosis in these animals.
ANTHROPOMETRIC DATASET COMPARISONS:
STATURE AND WEIGHT TREND IN ITALY
Ambra Giustetto1,2*, Margherita Micheletti Cremasco1,2,
Federica Caffaro1,3, Giordano Pierlorenzi4,
Alessandra Fenoglio1, Melchiorre Masali1
1Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology -DBIOS-
University of Torino, Torino, Italy; 2ICT e Innovazione per
Società e Territorio- ICxT University of Torino, Torino, Italy;
91th SIBS National Congress |Ancona, Italy, 9-10 November 2018
Non-commercial use only
3Institute for Agricultural and Earthmoving Machines (IMAMOT-
ER), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Torino, Italy;
4Accademia delle Belle Arti e Design e Istituto Europeo di
Psicologia ed Ergonomia Poliarte di Ancona, Ancona, Italy
*E-mail: ambra.giustetto@unito.it
Anthropometric features are inherited characters, that follow
a polygenic model and are strongly influenced by environmen-
tal aspects as life style. For this reason Anthropometric charac-
teristics are indeed very different by geographical area and
change in time. Studying and monitoring the becoming of these
variations, we search to verify the adequacy of the data sets to
their use for ergonomic design. The focus on the human mor-
phometric is current because of the interests of virtual design in
digital simulations, playing attention to refer to an appropriate
anthropometric database of “general population” rather than
“working population”. Italy has a tradition of anthropometric
studies in the academic field of Ergonomics already applied
since the ‘70ies and integrated into the interests of production
companies (Locati et al., 1979) and until today (Micheletti et
al., 2018). Moreover starting from method by Grieco and
Masali, 1972, we participated in the definition of the interna-
tional anthropometric standards (today ISO 7250.1: 2017)
and in the first national survey on general adults population
(“L’Italia si Misura” project, 1990-91 by M.Masali_University of
Torino and G.Pierlorenzi _Centro Sperimentale di Design now
PoliArte of Ancona). More than 4.000 subjects were measured,
males and females, representatives of different geographical
regions (35 measurement). This survey is today a source of ref-
erence data. Italians anthropometric characteristics are report-
ed, in particular relating to the estimates of increase in stature
and weight conditions according to what emerges from the
comparison of national databases of different periods to focus
on changes in progress in Italy.
OXIDATIVE STRESS INDUCTION BY THE INVASIVE
SPONGE PARALEUCILLA MAGNA GROWING ON
PEYSSONNELIA SQUAMARIA ALGAE
Eleonora Guzzetti1, Pere Ferriol2, Julio A. Díaz2,
Eduardo Salaberry3, Silvia Tejada4, Caterina Faggio1,
Antoni Sureda3*
1Department of Chemical, Biological, Pharmaceutical and
Environmental Sciences, University of Messina, Messina, Italy;
2Interdisciplinary Ecology Group, Biology Department,
University of the Balearic Islands, Palma de Mallorca, Spain;
3Research Group on Community Nutrition and Oxidative Stress
(NUCOX), University of Balearic Islands, Palma de Mallorca,
Spain; 4Laboratory of Neurophysiology, Department of Biology,
University of Balearic Islands, Palma de Mallorca, Spain
*E-mail: antoni.sureda@uib.es
The arrival of non-native species can produce significant
adverse effect on the colonized environments. The new
species can compete with autochthonous organisms for
resources and/or space leading to stress that can compromise
the survival of the affected organism. Paraleucilla magna is a
calcareous sponge introduced to the Mediterranean Sea and
Northeastern Atlantic. Eukaryotic cells contain a complex net-
work of antioxidant defences that protects against the exces-
sive production of reactive species induced by stressful situa-
tions avoiding damages to biomolecules. The aim of the study
was to determine whether the new-come specie P. magna
could induce the activation of the antioxidant defences in the
native red algae Peyssonnelia squamaria. Individuals of P.
squamaria growing isolated on rocky bottoms and individuals
epiphytized by P. magna were collected. The activity of
antioxidant enzymes Catalase, superoxide dismutase, glu-
tathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase – were signifi-
cantly higher in the group affected by sponge compared to
the control group, whereas the detoxifying enzyme GST did
not evidence significant differences. Malondialdehyde levels,
as marker of lipid peroxidation, were similar in samples epi-
phytized with the sponge when compared with the controls.
GSH and polyphenol levels were higher in algae affected by
the sponge compared to the control group. In conclusion, the
arrival of the species P. magna is a threat for the native red
alga P. squamaria inducing a situation of oxidative stress
measured by means of biomarkers.
CHARACTERIZATION OF THE METABOLIC PROFILE
OF PELAGIA NOCTILUCA (SCYPHOZOA)
Rosalia Li Volsi1*, Archimede Rotondo2, Rosaria Costa2,
Gioele Capillo1, Nunziacarla Spanò1
1Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Biologiche, Farmaceutiche
ed Ambientali (ChiBioFarAm), University of Messina, Messina,
Italy; 2Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Odontoiatriche, e
delle Immagini Morfologiche e Funzionali (Biomorf), University
of Messina, Messina, Italy
*E-mail: linda89lv@gmail.com
The phylum Cnidaria is one of the most important contrib-
utors in providing abundance of bio- and chemodiversity.
Jellyfish have to be considered a source of precious sub-
stances of diet and nutraceutical interest, such as collagen,
oligosaccharides, fatty acids and bioactive compounds,
including peptides and enzymes. This study elucidates the
chemical composition of the tissues belonging to the jellyfish
Pelagia noctiluca (Scyphozoa), which is the most abundant
jellyfish in the Mediterranean Sea. For each sample (male and
female) we have simultaneously extracted the water-soluble
phase (namely A) and the CDCl3soluble lipophilic fraction
(namely B), which were consequently analyzed by nuclear
magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The specific charac-
terisation of two different tissues, bell and tentacles respective-
ly, was carried out. As expected, samples showed the pres-
ence of aminoacids and other metabolites with similar con-
centration regardless of the kind of tissue. The B samples wit-
nessed the presence of different fatty species among the tis-
sues, as female bell is rich in simple triglycerides, which are
not present in the other analyzed tissues. Male tentacles are
characterized by the presence of polyunsaturated fatty acid
esters (often embedded in macromolecular complexes) and
animal sterols. We can conclude that there is a significant
chemical and nutritional difference among the jellyfish tissues.
MORPHOLOGICAL AND ULTRASTRUCTURAL STUDY
OF RHACOPHORUS REINWARDTII, SKIN (SCHLEGEL
1840, RHACOPHORIDAE, AMPHIBIA)
Carol Magazzù*, Krystyna Z ̇
uwala, Eugenia Rita Lauriano,
Marialuisa Aragona, Simona Pergolizzi, Józef Różański
Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche,Biologiche e Farmaceutiche
ed Ambientali, Università di Messina, Messina, Italy
*E-mail: carolmagazzu@postecert.it -
mgzcrl95l71f158e@studenti.unime.it
In this study we analyzed the morphological and ultrastruc-
tural characteristics of the Rhacophorus reinwardtii skin, a flying
frog, which is one of the few species of amphibians that uses
the “sliding flight” for movement. The ‘sliding flight’ of this
[Journal of Biological Research 2018; 91:s1] [page 11]
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species is possible thanks to prominent membranes which cre-
ate the surface, making it possible to overcome significant dis-
tances in the air. Using routine methods of LM, TEM and
SEM we have studied the skin from gliding membrane, toe, and
dewlap. We observed a conspicuous bundles of tonofilaments
in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells, allowing this species the
locomotion and the mechanism of adhesion to surfaces (gliding
membrane, toe, dewlap). In the toe outer layer, are present pris-
matic cells; furthermore in the epidermis of the gliding mem-
brane we have observed a layer of keratinized cells near the
surface. In the connective tissue under the epithelium there are
numerous mucous glands, an abundance of nerves and several
types of cells including:melanophores, iridiophores and xan-
thophores. Our future studies are aimed to compare
Rhacophoruss skin structures with those of other species exhibit-
ing similar behaviour (climbing/flying) (Rana leucomystax,
Litoria caerulea) and to characterize Merkel Cells and
Langerhans cells, both cells present in the skin of all vertebrates.
THE COMBINED EXPOSITION TO POLYBROMINATED
COMPOUNDS AND β-BLOCKERS MODULATES
VITALITY AND OXIDATIVE STRESS PARAMETERS IN
THE MARINE FISH CELL LINE SAF-1: PRELIMINARY
RESULTS
Concetta M. Messina1*, Cristobal Espinosa Ruiz1,
Simona Manuguerra1, Maria Morghese1, Rosaria Arena1,
Giuseppe Renda1, Alberto Cuesta1, Maria Esteban2,
Andrea Santulli1,3
1University of Palermo, Dept of Earth and Sea Science,
Laboratory of Marine Biochemistry and Ecotoxicology,
Trapani, Italy; 2Fish Innate Immune System Group.
Department of Cell Biology and Histology. Faculty of Biology,
Campus Regional de Excelencia Internacional “Campus Mare
Nostrum”, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain; 3Consorzio
Universitario della Provincia di Trapani, Marine Biology
Institute, Trapani, Italy
*E-mail: concetta.messina@unipa.it
Pharmaceutically active compounds have been detected
in wastewater treatment plants and surface waters across the
world. Among these compounds, some non-steroidal anti-
inflammatory drugs as well as β-blockers used to treat human
hypertension, such as atenolol (ATL), is one of the most abun-
dant reported at a very variable range, in relation to the site.
The uncertainty surrounding the behavior of these pharmaceu-
tically active compounds could increase due to the presence
of others pollutants in the marine environment.
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of bromi-
nated compounds which leads to accumulate in the marine
environment, being ubiquitous and toxic. The interactions
between PBDE and ATL and its effects on marine organisms
are still unknown and in vitro system are ideal for screening
of toxicity, dose-time exposure and studies on synergisms. In
the present study are reported some preliminary results
obtained in an experiment with the Sparus aurata fibroblast
cell line (SAF-1), exposed to different concentrations of BDE-
47, ATL and a mix of both, until 72 hours, to evaluate the cyto-
toxicity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.
Evaluation of molecular markers related to toxicity, oxidative
stress and cell cycle is in progress. At 72 hours the SAF-1 cells
exposed to both compounds showed a decreased viability.
Our preliminary results suggested the synergic effects of these
class of compounds, which not only could remark the impor-
tance of the development of effective treatment strategies for
remove these compounds from the marine environment, but
also the prevention of the discharge.
EFFECTS OF SUB-LETHAL DOSES OF THE
POLYBROMINATED BDE-47 ON SOME INNATE
IMMUNE RELATED PARAMETERS OF MYTILUS
GALLOPROVINCIALIS
Concetta M. Messina1*, Cristobal Espinosa Ruiz1,
Simona Manuguerra1, Maria Morghese1, Rosaria Arena1,
Francesco Sardo2, Giuseppe Renda1, Andrea Santulli1,3
1Department of Earth and Sea Science, Laboratory of Marine
Biochemistry and Ecotoxicology. University of Palermo, , Trapani,
Italy; 2Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Bologna,
Ozzano, Bologna, Italy; 3Consorzio Universitario della Provincia
di Trapani, Marine Biology Institute, Trapani, Italy
*E-mail: concetta.messina@unipa.it
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) belong to the class
of the flame retardants and are persistent and toxic pollutants,
extremely stables. In fact, PBDEs have demonstrated to produce
several negative effects on marine organisms. Marine bivalves
are susceptible to be exposed to a large quantity of pollutants
due to its feeding habits. However, the effects of PBDEs on the
innate immune system from mussels remains unclear. With the
aim to shed light on this issue, within the project CISAS, speci-
mens of Mytilus galloprovincialis were allowed in aquaria, fed
on microalgae contaminated with different concentrations of
PBDE-47. The treatment was maintained for 15 days. Samples
of haemolymph were obtained from T0 to 30 days of the exper-
iment. Both immune and humoral related parameters were eval-
uated and demonstrated to be affected by the treatment. In
addition, the results indicated that after 15 days of detoxifica-
tion, immune parameters did not restore its basal levels, but
some of them resulted overexpressed. BDE-47 exposure, at envi-
ronmentally realistic levels, may affect various aspects of
immune function in M. galloprovincialis, acting as a stressor
that can compromises the ability to counteract external stimuli,
such as pathogens, reducing animal welfare.
ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF CRUDE
VENOM FROM PELAGIA NOCTILUCA (CNIDARIA:
SCYPHOZOA) NEMATOCYSTS
Alessia Remigante1,2, Rossana Morabito2, Angela Marino2,
Silvia Dossena1
1Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Paracelsus
Medical University, Salzburg, Austria; 2Department of
Chemical, Biological, Pharmaceutical and Environmental
Sciences, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
*E-mail: alessia.remigante@pmu.ac.at - aremigante@unime.it
Cnidarians are known to negatively impact on ecosys-
tems and human economic activities, and represent a health
problem consequent to their stings. However, their venom is
a rich source of bioactive compounds, and is only partially
characterized. Pelagia noctiluca (Cnidaria: Scyphozoa) is
the most abundant jellyfish in the Mediterranean Sea, and it
is mostly found in the Strait of Messina (Italy). To investigate
the properties of P. noctiluca venom, cultured human cells
were exposed to the crude venom (0,025 ug/ul). Changes in
the cellular volume were monitored by phase contrast
microscopy and the membrane conductance was measured
by patch clamp. The exposure of cells to the venom induced
a dramatic cell swelling and profoundly altered the ion con-
ductance of the plasma membrane, thus affecting the home-
ostatic functions of the maintenance and regulation of cellu-
lar volume. Venom-treated cells exhibited a large inwardly
rectifying current, mainly due to permeation of Na+and Cl-
and sensitive to amiloride. Cell swelling and the venom-
induced current were completely abrogated following
91th SIBS National Congress |Ancona, Italy, 9-10 November 2018
Non-commercial use only
removal of NaCl from the extracellular solution and thermal
treatment of venom extract. The current-inducing activity was
also observed following delivery of venom to the cytosolic
side of the plasma membrane, consistent with a pore-forming
mechanism. This is the first study exploring in detail the abil-
ity of P. noctiluca venom to modify the electrophysiological
properties of mammalian cells. In this light, the study i) pro-
vides essential information on a possible use of bioactive
substances; ii) provides new strategies in the treatment of
envenomation.
ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITIES OF EXTRACTS FROM
GRACILARIA GRACILIS (RHODOPHYTA)
Serena Savoca1*, Gioele Capillo1, Giuseppe Panarello1,
Angelina Lo Giudice2, Carmen Rizzo1, Rossana Rando3,
Giovanni Bartolomeo3, Rosaria Costa3, Nunziacarla Spanò3
1Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Biologiche,
Farmaceutiche ed Ambientali, Università degli Studi di
Messina, Messina, Italy; 2Istituto per le Risorse Biologiche e le
Biotecnologie Marine (IRBIM), Messina, Italy; 3Department of
Biomedical, Dental and Morphological and Functional
Imaging, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
*E-mail: ssavoca@unime.it
Marine algae produce a wide variety of bioactive
metabolites as antimicrobial, antifeedant, antihelmintic and
cytotoxic agents. These compounds include alkaloids,
polyketides, cyclic peptides, polysaccharides, phlorotan-
nins, diterpenoids, sterols, quinones, lipids and glycerols.
The antimicrobial potential differs among the different class-
es of seaweed, with the most promising being
Rhodophyceae, followed by Chlorophyceae and
Phaeophyceae. In this study, the antimicrobial potential of
Gracilaria gracilis, from the Natural Reserve of Capo Peloro
(Sicily, Italy), was evaluated. Soxhelet extractions was car-
ried out using five different solvents (methanol, ethanol, ace-
tone, chloroform and ethyl ether). Extracts were tested
against Gram positive and Gram negative pathogens (i.e.
Vibrio cholerae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella sp.,
Bacillus subtilis, Aeromonas hydrophila, Vibrio fischeri). The
antimicrobial susceptibility was assessed using the “agar
disk diffusion method”: 20 l of each extract (at three differ-
ent concentrations) were tested. Results showed that all the
extracts were active against B. subtilis, with the best result
that was obtained using the methanolic extract (inhibition
halo diameter: 19 mm). A slight activity was also observed
towards Vibrio fischeri. Our results enlarge the existing
knowledge about the antimicrobial potential of red macroal-
gae. Further studies will be necessary to deepen the activity
of Gracilaria gracilis against other Gram positive bacteria.
Moreover, considering that Bacillus subtilis is often associat-
ed with food poisoning outbreaks, it could be suggested the
use of G. gracilis extracts in the complexation of food
preservatives, useful to reduce the risks deriving from the
contamination by such microorganism.
THE EFFECTS OF ACUTE EXPOSURE OF
NEONICOTINOID INSECTICIDE ON DIFFERENT
SPECIES OF CRAYFISH
Alžběta Stará1,2*, Alžběta Strouhová2, Antonín Kouba2,
Josef Velíšek2, Caterina Faggio1
1Department of Chemical, Biological, Pharmaceutical and
Environmental Sciences, University of Messina, Messina, Italy;
2Faculty of Fisheries and Protection of Waters, South
Bohemian Research Centre of Aquaculture and Biodiversity of
Hydrocenoses, University of South Bohemia in Čes
Budějovice, Vodňany, Czech Republic
*E-mail: staraa01@frov.jcu.cz
Neonicotinoids are one of the newest class of pesticides,
used in agriculture like insecticides from the beginning of 90
years. They have become very popular and widely used all over
the world for their low toxicity to vertebrates. Together, in last
years some of the active substances in the neonicotinoid group
(clothianidin, imidacloprid a thiamethoxam) have been banned
for their secondary impact on non-target organisms and the envi-
ronment. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute toxi-
city 96hLC50 of Calypso 480 SC (containing 48% neonicoti-
noid thiacloprid) on three species of crayfish. We used two dif-
ferent developmental stages: marbled crayfish (Procambarus fal-
lax f. virginalis), red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and
common yabby (Cherax destructor), which were tested separate-
ly. The Calypso 480 SC had a more toxic effect on to younger
stages of crayfish, the 96hLC50 in mg/L was: 1.60 and 27.30
marbled crayfish, 1.13 and 1.94 red swamp crayfish, 0.52 and
7.65 mg/L common yabby, values are sorted consecutively
younger and then older. Also changes in behaviour in crayfish
exposed to insecticide were observed, as is reduced aggressive-
ness, slowing movement of the limbs, reduced breathing, turning
the crayfish on the back, apathy of organisms and subsequent
deaths. This study provides and complements other important
results for evaluating the toxicity effect of thiacloprid on non-tar-
get species, respectively crayfish. Acknowledgements:
Supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the
Czech Republic - projects CENAKVA (No.
CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0024) and CENAKVA II (No. LO1205
under the NPU I program), and project Development of
University of South Bohemia: International Mobility MSCA IF
(no. CZ.02.2.69/0.0/0.0/17_050/0008486).
METHADONE VERSUS BUPRENORPHINE: DATA
DETECTED FROM CALTANISSETTA SER.T
Fabio Venturella1, Giulia Cancellieri2,
Anastasia Valentina Liga2*, Francesca Mortillaro2,
Annamaria Di Carlo2
1Department of Biological, Chemical and Pharmaceutical
Science and Technologies, University of Palermo, Palermo,
Italy; 2Graduated in Pharmacy, University of Palermo,
Palermo, Italy
*E-mail: ania.liga90the@gmail.com
In last years, heroin-addicted have exponentially
increased: this has made it necessary to identify a pharmaco-
logical strategy as effective as possible. With this purpose, a
statistical investigation was conducted in a sample of individ-
uals, aged between 18 and 50. They were diagnosed and
subjected to different treatments at Ser.T of Caltanissetta
(Sicily-Italy) during the period 2013-2017. The analyzed
patients were treated with three different pharmacological
therapy: methadone 0.1%, methadone 0.5%, buprenorphine
and suboxone. We obtained percentages of RESPONDERS,
LOW RESPONDERS and NON RESPONDERS patients from
data processing, based on used therapy. Considering phar-
macological responses of the sample examined, it is possible
to observe that the treatment with buprenorphine has led to
71.98% of RESPONDERS subjects, 23.52% of LOW
RESPONDERS and 4.5% of NON RESPONDERS. Instead, the
administration of methadone 0.1 % has produced 82.82% of
RESPONDERS subjects, 11.08% of LOW RESPONDERS,
6.1% of NON RESPONDERS. The therapy with methadone
[Journal of Biological Research 2018; 91:s1] [page 13]
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91th SIBS National Congress |Ancona, Italy, 9-10 November 2018
0.5% has resulted 88.98% of RESPONDERS subjects, 7.8%
of LOW RESPONDERS, 3.22% of NON RESPONDERS.
Finally, through the administration of suboxone, we obtained
86.34% of RESPONDERS subjects, 9.84% of LOW RESPON-
DERS and 3.82% of NON RESPONDERS. In conclusion,
although it has emerged that treatment with methadone 0.5%
is the most successful therapy, it is preferable to use suboxone
(except in relapsing subjects) since it has also produced a
high number of RESPONDERS subjects and a good safety pro-
file for heroin addicted patients.
STATISTICAL ANALYSIS ABOUT DIFFUSION
OF EXERCISE ADDICTION IN SICILY
Fabio Venturella1, Anastasia Valentina Liga2*,
Francesca Catania2, Giulia Cancellieri2
1Department of Biological, Chemical and Pharmaceutical
Science and Technologies, University of Palermo, Palermo,
Italy; 2Graduated in Pharmacy, University of Palermo, Palermo,
Italy
*E-mail: ania.liga90the@gmail.com
Exercise Addiction (EA) is a behavioral dysfunction
marked by uncontrolled compulsion towards all kinds of phys-
ical activity. With the purpose of understanding the epidemi-
ology of this steadily increasing phenomenon, we have done
a statistical analysis about some data obtained through the
administration of an online-questionnaire (Google forms): the
same one was also converted into paper-questionnaire and
then it has been administered in many gyms in Palermo and
Trapani (Sicily-Italy). The sample examined consists of 976
people aged between 14 and 65 (47.3% of them are women
and 52.7% are men). For 53.8% of analyzed people, physi-
cal activity is one of the most important things of their life. In
fact, 18% of them declared to have conflicts with family or
friends, because of the excessive hours dedicated to sport.
Moreover, 86.2% of them pointed out that physical activity is
a mood-booster. Probably for this reason, 49.6% of them
claimed that they have drastically increased the number of
hours devoted to physical activities in last years. Now, the
most impressive statistic is the following one: 23.5% of sur-
veyed declared that they get restless and nervous if they are
unable to perform the training. Thanks to the last data, a clear
symptom of craving emerged. It is very complicated to make
a diagnosis of EA: however, through these questionnaires, the
data indicate the presence of behaviors related to the Exercise
Addiction. For this reason, it is necessary to act with preven-
tive and information works in order to stem this not fully
known phenomenon as much as possible.
AMATEUR DOPING: A SURVEY AMONG SICILIAN
PEOPLE
Fabio Venturella1, Giulia Cancellieri2*, Francesca Catania2,
Anastasia Valentina Liga2
1Department of Biological, Chemical and Pharmaceutical
Science and Technologies, University of Palermo, Palermo,
Italy; 2Graduated in Pharmacy, University of Palermo, Palermo,
Italy
*E-mail: giulia.cancellieri@hotmail.it
In last years, Amateur Doping has caused many victims. In
order to know the diffusion of this phenomenon, we have con-
ducted an online-survey through Google forms. We also trans-
formed the same questionnaire on paper and it was adminis-
tered in many gyms in Palermo and Trapani (Sicily-Italy). The
sample examined consists of 976 people aged between 14
and 65 (47.3% of them are women and 52.7% are men). We
asked them if they ever took on substances to improve their
athletic performances: 25.8% of them answered affirmatively
and they declared to take on protein, amino acids but also
Eca Stacks, which are hired on regular basis (34.6%). They
bought this substances in sporting stores (32.2%), in pharma-
cy without prescription (26.8%), on internet sites (22.8%), in
gyms (10.7%); 7.5% of them answered that they bought sub-
stances in other place. Furthermore, 17.9% of them declared
that training companions, but also coaches and/or responsi-
ble of sports societies have proposed to them to take doping-
substances (Winstrol, Tamoxifene, Testosterone, EPO, exc...).
16.8% of interviewed claimed that is right to take substance
with the purpose to improve their performances. However,
when we asked them if they would ever have taken sub-
stances to their children, 95.8% of them answered “absolutely
not”. They also declared to want more information about the
real dangers related to uncorrected doping-substances intake.
In conclusion, it appears necessary to adopt measures of
information and prevention to reduce diffusion of this danger-
ous phenomenon.
Non-commercial use only
Index of authors
A
Abitante, Lucia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Aliko, Valbona. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Amici, Roberto. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Amin, Nida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Aragona, Marialuisa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9,11
Arena, Rosaria. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Avitabile, Elisabetta. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,9
B
Baiamonte, Concetta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Bailoni, Lucia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Bartolomeo, Giovanni. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Benazzi, Stefano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Bernardinelli, Emanuele . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Blahova, Jana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Boano, Rosa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,7
Boattini, Alessio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Bortolini, Eugenio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Bridelli, Maria Grazia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Brigidi, Patrizia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Brizzi, Maurizio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Bruni, Antonella . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Buccioni, Arianna. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Burlando, Bruno. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
C
Caffaro, Federica. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Cancellieri, Giulia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,14
Candela, Marco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Capillo, Gioele. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,9,11,13
Cardazzo, Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Carraro, Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Casuccio, Alessandra. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Catania, Francesca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Cavallo, Maria Chiara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Cecconello, Edoardo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Cerri, Matteo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Cervellera, Stefano. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Chiavazza, Paola Maria. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Chiavetta, Pierfrancesco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Cinti, Alessandra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Cocchi, Massimo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Cocilovo, Claudia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Cornara, Laura . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Costa, Rosaria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,13
Cottone, Salvatore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Cuesta, Alberto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
D
D’Avino, Cristina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,8,9
Dallocchio, Roberto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
De Iasio, Sergio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,7
Dessì, Alessandro. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Di Carlo, Annamaria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Di Majo, Danila . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,10
Díaz, Julio A.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Dossena, Silvia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,7,12
E
Espinosa Ruiz, Cristobal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Esteban, Maria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
F
Faber, Paulo L.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Faggio, Caterina. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,7,9,10,11,13
Fanelli, Mirco. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Fenoglio, Alessandra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Ferriol, Pere. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Fiorino, Emma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Fozza, Claudio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Freitas, Teresa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Fulcheri, Ezio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
G
Garcia-Perez, Jose Luis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Gennaro, Valerio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Giammanco, Marco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,10
Gianicolo, Emilio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Giordani, Paolo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Girotti, Marilena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,7
Giustetto, Ambra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Grimaudo, Stefania . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Guichard, Etienne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Guida, Lucrezia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Guzzetti, Eleonora . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
H
Hitrec, Timna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
J
Jagoda, Evelyn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
K
Kouba, Antonín . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
L
La Guardia, Maurizio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,10
Lauriano, Eugenia Rita. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9,11
Lavorano, Silvia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Leo, Ludovica. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Li Volsi, Rosalia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Liga, Anastasia Valentina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,14
Lo Giudice, Angelina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Loddo, Saverio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
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Luiselli, Donata. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
M
Magazzù, Carol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9,11
Malagoli-Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Manuguerra, Simona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Marchetti, Giuseppe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,8,9
Marino, Angela . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,7,10,12
Mariottini, Gian Luigi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Masali, Melchiorre. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Medici, Serenella. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Mehmeti, Enis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Mele, Marcello . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Messina, Concetta M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,13
Micheletti Cremasco, Margherita . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Morabito, Rossana. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,7,12
Morghese, Maria. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Mortillaro, Francesca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Murchio, Giovanni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Musella, Margherita. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
N
Nagy, Tamas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Nepveu, Francoise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
O
Orrù, Alessia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,7
P
Pagani, Luca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Pagano, Maria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Panarello, Giuseppe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,13
Pantaleo, Antonella . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,8,9
Peona, Valentina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Pergolizzi, Simona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9,11
Pettener, Davide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Pierlorenzi, Giordano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Pipitone, Rosaria Maria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Piscitiello, Emiliana. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Plhalova, Lucie. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Polverini, Eugenia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Q
Qirjo, Mihallaq . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
R
Rabino Massa, Emma. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Rando, Rossana. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Realmuto, Sabrina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Regoli, Francesco. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Remigante, Alessia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,7,12
Renda, Giuseppe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Reybier, Karine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Ricci, Marco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Rizzo, Carmen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Rotondo, Archimede. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Różański, Józef . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Rubio-Roldán, Alejandro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Russo, Antonello. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
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Salaberry, Eduardo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Saldanha, Carlota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Sanfilippo, Marilena. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Santos Silva-Herdade, Ana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Santulli, Andrea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,12
Sardo, Francesco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Sarno, Stefania . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Savoca, Serena. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,13
Serra, Andrea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Sisa, Claudia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Smeriglio, Antonella . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Sozzo, Sara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Spanò, Nunziacarla. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,11,13
Squarcio, Fabio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Stanzani, Agnese. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Stará, Alžběta. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,13
Strouhová, Alžběta. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Sureda, Antoni. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Svobodova, Zdenka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
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Taccioli, Cristian. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Tejada, Silvia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Traversari, Mirko . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Trichilo, Vincenzo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Trombetta, Domenico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Tsamesidis, Ioannis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,8,9
Turrini, Francesco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Turroni, Silvia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Tuszyński, Jack A.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
U
Ugolini, Valeria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
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Valente, Marcello . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Velíšek, Josef . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Venturella, Fabio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,14
Viti, Carlo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Z
Zito, Rossella . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Ż
uwala, Krystyna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
91th SIBS National Congress |Ancona, Italy, 9-10 November 2018
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To provide a comprehensive overview of the risk of venous thrombosis in women using different combined oral contraceptives. Systematic review and network meta-analysis. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Academic Search Premier, and ScienceDirect up to 22 April 2013. Observational studies that assessed the effect of combined oral contraceptives on venous thrombosis in healthy women. The primary outcome of interest was a fatal or non-fatal first event of venous thrombosis with the main focus on deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Publications with at least 10 events in total were eligible. The network meta-analysis was performed using an extension of frequentist random effects models for mixed multiple treatment comparisons. Unadjusted relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were reported. The requirement for crude numbers did not allow adjustment for potential confounding variables. 3110 publications were retrieved through a search strategy; 25 publications reporting on 26 studies were included. Incidence of venous thrombosis in non-users from two included cohorts was 1.9 and 3.7 per 10 000 woman years, in line with previously reported incidences of 1-6 per 10 000 woman years. Use of combined oral contraceptives increased the risk of venous thrombosis compared with non-use (relative risk 3.5, 95% confidence interval 2.9 to 4.3). The relative risk of venous thrombosis for combined oral contraceptives with 30-35 µg ethinylestradiol and gestodene, desogestrel, cyproterone acetate, or drospirenone were similar and about 50-80% higher than for combined oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel. A dose related effect of ethinylestradiol was observed for gestodene, desogestrel, and levonorgestrel, with higher doses being associated with higher thrombosis risk. All combined oral contraceptives investigated in this analysis were associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis. The effect size depended both on the progestogen used and the dose of ethinylestradiol.
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Giant Mudskipper, Periophthalmodon schlosseri (Pallas, 1770), is euryhaline, amphibious, and air-breathing fish. These fishes live in close association to mangrove forests and often spend over 90% of time out of water, in adjacent mudflats. They have developed morphological and physiological adaptations to satisfy their unique lifestyles. The skin is the primary interface between the body and the environment, and has a central role in host defence. The initiation of immune responses to antigens in the vertebrate skin has often been attributed to epidermal Langerhans'cells (LC) that are dendritic cells (DC), antigen-presenting cells (APC) which reside in the epidermis. Dendritic cells have been characterized morphologically and functionally in the teleost fish tissues such as rainbow trout, salmonids, medaka, African catfish and zebrafish. However, there is no evidence of the presence of DCs and their role in mudskippers immunity. The aim of this preliminary study was to characterize, through use of specific antibodies: Toll-like receptor 2, S100, serotonin (5-HT), and Vesicular acetylcholine transporter VAChT, a specific DC-like subpopulation in Pn. schlosseri's epidermis.
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Langerhans cells (LCs) are a specialized subset of dendritic cells (DCs) that populate the epidermal layer of the skin. Langerin is a lectin that serves as a valuable marker for LCs in mice and humans. In recent years, new mouse models have led to the identification of other langerin(+) DC subsets that are not present in the epidermis, including a subset of DCs that is found in most non-lymphoid tissues. In this Review we describe new developments in the understanding of the biology of LCs and other langerin(+) DCs and discuss the challenges that remain in identifying the role of different DC subsets in tissue immunity.
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Estrogen has been shown to protect skeletal muscle from damage and to exert antioxidant properties. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the antioxidant and protective properties of estrogens in rodent cardiac and skeletal muscle and H9c2 cells. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into three groups, ovariectomized (OVX), ovariectomized with estrogen replacement (OVX + E2), and intact control (SHAM), and were assessed at two time periods, 4 and 8 weeks. Rodents hearts were analyzed for basal and iron-stimulated lipid peroxidation in the absence and presence of beta-estradiol (betaE2) by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS). Isolated soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) were analyzed for creatine kinase (CK) efflux. Using H9c2 cells, the in vitro effects of betaE2 and its isomer alpha-estradiol were investigated under glucose-free/hypoxic conditions. TBARS assay was also performed on the H9c2 in the presence or absence of betaE2. The results indicate that OVX rodent hearts are more susceptible to lipid peroxidation than OVX + E2 hearts. OVX soleus showed higher cumulative efflux of CK than OVX + E2. Furthermore, H9c2 survival during oxidative stress was enhanced when estrogen was present, and both OVX hearts at 4 weeks and H9c2 cells particularly were protected from oxidative damage by estrogens. We conclude that estrogen protects both skeletal and cardiac muscle from damage, and its antioxidant activity can contribute to this protection.
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Unlabelled: Aging is associated with declining levels of several hormones, including estrogen. Although the effects of estrogen on the skin are still not fully understood, it is known that, in women, declining estrogen levels are associated with a variety of cutaneous changes, many of which can be reversed or improved by estrogen supplementation. Estrogens are C-18 steroids synthesized from cholesterol in the ovary premenopausally and in the peripheral tissue in postmenopausal women. Two estrogen receptors, alpha and beta, have been cloned and found in various tissue types. Studies of postmenopausal women indicate that estrogen deprivation is associated with dryness, atrophy, fine wrinkling, poor healing, and hot flashes. Epidermal thinning, declining dermal collagen content, diminished skin moisture, decreased laxity, and impaired wound healing have been reported in postmenopausal women. This article reviews the effects of declining estrogen levels on the skin and the effects of estrogen supplementation. Learning objective: At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants should be familiar with the pathways of estrogen synthesis, sites of estrogen receptors, age-dependent variations in serum estrogen concentration, the changes seen in postmenopausal skin, and the effects of estrogen supplementation.
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Cerri M. (2017) Annu Rev Physiol, 79:167-186.
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Carey et al., (2013) Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol., 304(1):R33-42.
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Sommer F et al., (2016) Cell Rep, 14(7):1655-1661.
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Guzzetti, Eleonora............................ 11 [page 16] [Journal of Biological Research 2018; 91:s1]