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European Framework for the Digital Competence of Educators: DigCompEdu

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As the teaching professions face rapidly changing demands, educators require an increasingly broad and more sophisticated set of competences than before. In particular the ubiquity of digital devices and the duty to help students become digitally competent requires educators to develop their own digital competence. On International and national level a number of frameworks, self-assessment tools and training programmes have been developed to describe the facets of digital competence for educators and to help them assess their competence, identify their training needs and offer targeted training. Analysing and clustering these instruments, this report presents a common European Framework for the Digital Competence of Educators (DigCompEdu). DigCompEdu is a scientifically sound background framework which helps to guide policy and can be directly adapted to implement regional and national tools and training programmes. In addition, it provides a common language and approach that will help the dialogue and exchange of best practices across borders. The DigCompEdu framework is directed towards educators at all levels of education, from early childhood to higher and adult education, including general and vocational training, special needs education, and non-formal learning contexts. It aims to provide a general reference frame for developers of Digital Competence models, i.e. Member States, regional governments, relevant national and regional agencies, educational organisations themselves, and public or private professional training providers.
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... Digital competence as a concept has gradually come to be addressed in early childhood practices and in policy documents. Recent updates to the curricula for preschools in Denmark as well as Sweden highlight that education should contribute to children's ability to act in an increasingly digitalised society and develop their skills in using digital technology in their everyday lives (Ministry of Children and Education, 2020;Medierådet for børn og unge, 2019;Skolverket, 2011Skolverket, , 2018Utbildningsdepartementet, 2017;Redecker, 2017). This concern relates to digital technology having come to be seen as an important source of support for educators and children's active participation in teaching and learning activities (Brooks et al., 2020;Fleer, 2019). ...
... However, including digital technology as part of pedagogical endeavours is not simply a matter of educators' willingness to apply new ways of acting with or having access to digital tools; it is a multi-layered process of professional change that includes both the educator's mindset and pedagogical dispositions informing new teaching and learning strategies (cf. Redecker, 2017). This evokes questions of how educators can make sense of present complex demands on enhancing their digital competence to improve technological integration in their everyday educational activities. ...
... The types of metaphors identified in the data can be regarded as rather generic. In relating the educators' initial experiences to the use of digital technology in educational settings, they can be aligned with previous studies (Redecker, 2017;Dorst, 2015;Phelps et al., 2011) and as such be made possible to be understood and applied in similar research contexts. Our main contribution involves the benefits of the making-breaking-re-creating model, with the three constituents together forming an opportunity space. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
Technology-rich creative and collaborative learning environments are believed to offer powerful settings for children to become acquainted with computational concepts through playful ways of learning. This chapter draws on a body of empirical research grounded in a Living Lab environment at Aalborg University in Denmark (Xlab – Design, Learning, Innovation), which functions as an educational mediator of playful workshops offering hands-on experience of technologies and creative approaches to experiment- and explorative-oriented activities, where children and teachers can play to learn. The chapter offers insights into understanding the tensions and potentials of such technology-rich environments for participatory-driven creative learning, providing information on practice-related possibilities for and constraints to implementing technology-rich educational designs in early years education.
... If material is not included in the chapter's Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. 100 to children's ability to act in an increasingly digitalised society and develop their skills in using digital technology in their everyday lives (Ministry of Children and Education, 2020; Medierådet for børn og unge, 2019; Skolverket, 2011Skolverket, , 2018Utbildningsdepartementet, 2017;Redecker, 2017). This concern relates to digital technology having come to be seen as an important source of support for educators and children's active participation in teaching and learning activities (Brooks et al., 2020;Fleer, 2019). ...
... However, including digital technology as part of pedagogical endeavours is not simply a matter of educators' willingness to apply new ways of acting with or having access to digital tools; it is a multi-layered process of professional change that includes both the educator's mindset and pedagogical dispositions informing new teaching and learning strategies (cf. Redecker, 2017). This evokes questions of how educators can make sense of present complex demands on enhancing their digital competence to improve technological integration in their everyday educational activities. ...
... The types of metaphors identified in the data can be regarded as rather generic. In relating the educators' initial experiences to the use of digital technology in educational settings, they can be aligned with previous studies (Redecker, 2017;Dorst, 2015;Phelps et al., 2011) and as such be made possible to be understood and applied in similar research contexts. Our main contribution involves the benefits of the making-breaking-re-creating model, with the three constituents together forming an opportunity space. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
This project was aimed at taking on the challenge of developing a didaktik for preschool, through empirical and theoretical work. The design was built on teachers’ own video observations of play activities in preschool, where they themselves were participants. Teachers, their principals, and researchers met regularly at the university to collaboratively discuss the video recordings. On these occasions the researchers also provided further education on theoretical concepts useful for analysing play activities in preschool, such as metacommunication and intersubjectivity. The outcome was the theorisation of Play-Responsive Early Childhood Education and Care (PRECEC), consisting of a coherent conceptualisation of teaching, as a responsive activity, and play, as something participants signal to each other through shifts between communicating and acting as is and as if. A challenge we discuss in this chapter is how to deal with the ‘unknown’ in a practice-based research project, i.e. not only reproducing knowledge (further education) but also, critically and at the same time, developing new knowledge (research).
... If material is not included in the chapter's Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. 100 to children's ability to act in an increasingly digitalised society and develop their skills in using digital technology in their everyday lives (Ministry of Children and Education, 2020; Medierådet for børn og unge, 2019; Skolverket, 2011Skolverket, , 2018Utbildningsdepartementet, 2017;Redecker, 2017). This concern relates to digital technology having come to be seen as an important source of support for educators and children's active participation in teaching and learning activities (Brooks et al., 2020;Fleer, 2019). ...
... However, including digital technology as part of pedagogical endeavours is not simply a matter of educators' willingness to apply new ways of acting with or having access to digital tools; it is a multi-layered process of professional change that includes both the educator's mindset and pedagogical dispositions informing new teaching and learning strategies (cf. Redecker, 2017). This evokes questions of how educators can make sense of present complex demands on enhancing their digital competence to improve technological integration in their everyday educational activities. ...
... The types of metaphors identified in the data can be regarded as rather generic. In relating the educators' initial experiences to the use of digital technology in educational settings, they can be aligned with previous studies (Redecker, 2017;Dorst, 2015;Phelps et al., 2011) and as such be made possible to be understood and applied in similar research contexts. Our main contribution involves the benefits of the making-breaking-re-creating model, with the three constituents together forming an opportunity space. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this commentary concluding this volume (Wallerstedt, Brooks, Ødegaard & Pramling, this volume), we discuss three principal matters: (i) what constitutes problems in research carried out in collaboration between researchers and ECEC personnel, (ii) limitations and ethical dilemmas that we find particular to such research, and finally (iii) the very terminology employed for this kind of research and its participating groups of collaborators.
... If material is not included in the chapter's Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. 100 to children's ability to act in an increasingly digitalised society and develop their skills in using digital technology in their everyday lives (Ministry of Children and Education, 2020; Medierådet for børn og unge, 2019; Skolverket, 2011Skolverket, , 2018Utbildningsdepartementet, 2017;Redecker, 2017). This concern relates to digital technology having come to be seen as an important source of support for educators and children's active participation in teaching and learning activities (Brooks et al., 2020;Fleer, 2019). ...
... However, including digital technology as part of pedagogical endeavours is not simply a matter of educators' willingness to apply new ways of acting with or having access to digital tools; it is a multi-layered process of professional change that includes both the educator's mindset and pedagogical dispositions informing new teaching and learning strategies (cf. Redecker, 2017). This evokes questions of how educators can make sense of present complex demands on enhancing their digital competence to improve technological integration in their everyday educational activities. ...
... The types of metaphors identified in the data can be regarded as rather generic. In relating the educators' initial experiences to the use of digital technology in educational settings, they can be aligned with previous studies (Redecker, 2017;Dorst, 2015;Phelps et al., 2011) and as such be made possible to be understood and applied in similar research contexts. Our main contribution involves the benefits of the making-breaking-re-creating model, with the three constituents together forming an opportunity space. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
The MIROR Project (2010–2013) was a large-scale international research project financed by the EU, involving various researchers from six countries. It dealt with the development of an adaptive system (artificial intelligence, AI) for music learning and teaching in the context of early childhood music education. The project was based on a spiral design approach, involving coupled interactions between the technical partners and the research partners (from the disciplines of psychology and pedagogy/education). It raised methodological challenges concerning how the experiments and technology were designed, as they did not relate to Swedish preschool tradition, which will serve here as the contextualised case from which more general issues will be discussed. Different ethical issues were also faced in regard to how the research was planned, and stemming from the fact that there were commercial interests involved.
... If material is not included in the chapter's Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. 100 to children's ability to act in an increasingly digitalised society and develop their skills in using digital technology in their everyday lives (Ministry of Children and Education, 2020; Medierådet for børn og unge, 2019; Skolverket, 2011Skolverket, , 2018Utbildningsdepartementet, 2017;Redecker, 2017). This concern relates to digital technology having come to be seen as an important source of support for educators and children's active participation in teaching and learning activities (Brooks et al., 2020;Fleer, 2019). ...
... However, including digital technology as part of pedagogical endeavours is not simply a matter of educators' willingness to apply new ways of acting with or having access to digital tools; it is a multi-layered process of professional change that includes both the educator's mindset and pedagogical dispositions informing new teaching and learning strategies (cf. Redecker, 2017). This evokes questions of how educators can make sense of present complex demands on enhancing their digital competence to improve technological integration in their everyday educational activities. ...
... The types of metaphors identified in the data can be regarded as rather generic. In relating the educators' initial experiences to the use of digital technology in educational settings, they can be aligned with previous studies (Redecker, 2017;Dorst, 2015;Phelps et al., 2011) and as such be made possible to be understood and applied in similar research contexts. Our main contribution involves the benefits of the making-breaking-re-creating model, with the three constituents together forming an opportunity space. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
Experiences from practices-development research, as presented in Part II of this book, identify what we call wicked tensions and problems (Bentley J, Toth. Exploring wicked problems: what they are and why they are important. ArchWay Publishing, 2020). The experienced team from Sweden, Denmark, and Norway have collaborated for many years with early years teachers and the early childhood education and care (ECEC; i.e. in these national contexts, preschool/kindergarten) sector in their efforts to respond to societal problems alongside practitioners. Enhancing meaningful practices in the ECEC sector by creating relevant academic knowledge for and within this sector is a policy expectation in response to the wicked problem of societal problems. In the effort to do so, our experience is that even if this effort is rewarding and new knowledge is created and practices are transformed, a range of tensions occur already from the start of new projects, and we encounter problems we cannot solve as they lie outside our immediate responsibility. Additionally, collaboration can risk violating the standards of research and the traditions of education. This chapter draws on examples from Part II of this book (Wallerstedt, Brooks, Ødegaard & Pramling, this volume). While the projects reported on vary in pedagogical themes, sites, and participants, they share a participatory research design in their efforts to respond to challenges and develop practices while undertaking research. The chapter first elaborates on the nature and challenges of wicked tensions and problems and thereafter identifies some of the tensions and problems reported. The aim of the chapter is to articulate the tensions and problems on a meta-level for further efforts of partnership research. The vision for knowledge development entering practices-development research from the reported projects is clear and similar across the projects. The common vision is to nurture practices for long-term knowledge gains. In this chapter, we suggest that experiences and reflexivity from the collaborative Scandinavian milieus across these projects can articulate some wicked tensions and problems and improve knowledge in this regard. The chapter provides a summary list of recommendations for stakeholders to consider when planning and conducting participatory design research.
... If material is not included in the chapter's Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. 100 to children's ability to act in an increasingly digitalised society and develop their skills in using digital technology in their everyday lives (Ministry of Children and Education, 2020; Medierådet for børn og unge, 2019; Skolverket, 2011Skolverket, , 2018Utbildningsdepartementet, 2017;Redecker, 2017). This concern relates to digital technology having come to be seen as an important source of support for educators and children's active participation in teaching and learning activities (Brooks et al., 2020;Fleer, 2019). ...
... However, including digital technology as part of pedagogical endeavours is not simply a matter of educators' willingness to apply new ways of acting with or having access to digital tools; it is a multi-layered process of professional change that includes both the educator's mindset and pedagogical dispositions informing new teaching and learning strategies (cf. Redecker, 2017). This evokes questions of how educators can make sense of present complex demands on enhancing their digital competence to improve technological integration in their everyday educational activities. ...
... The types of metaphors identified in the data can be regarded as rather generic. In relating the educators' initial experiences to the use of digital technology in educational settings, they can be aligned with previous studies (Redecker, 2017;Dorst, 2015;Phelps et al., 2011) and as such be made possible to be understood and applied in similar research contexts. Our main contribution involves the benefits of the making-breaking-re-creating model, with the three constituents together forming an opportunity space. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
The aim of this chapter is to reflect on and problematise some of the collective processes that emerged in a 3-year participatory project. The project, situated in a linguistically and culturally diverse neighbourhood of a major Swedish city, was carried out between 2017 and 2019. The overall aim was to, in collaboration with participants, explore the conditions for early childhood education in a migrating world by identifying the challenges facing preschool institutions. An additional aim was to develop preschool practice through reflection and action. The project started out in an introductory unit for immigrant children aged 3–5 years who spoke little or no Swedish upon entering the unit; then, as the project went on, the whole preschool was gradually included in actions carried out in collaboration. Some of the spaces for action that opened up for the children, educators, and preschool managers are addressed in the chapter. Challenges involved, among other things, differences in the possibility to take part in action research processes among families involved in asylum processes and what space for action the preschool educators were actually afforded in the project.
... If material is not included in the chapter's Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. 100 to children's ability to act in an increasingly digitalised society and develop their skills in using digital technology in their everyday lives (Ministry of Children and Education, 2020; Medierådet for børn og unge, 2019; Skolverket, 2011Skolverket, , 2018Utbildningsdepartementet, 2017;Redecker, 2017). This concern relates to digital technology having come to be seen as an important source of support for educators and children's active participation in teaching and learning activities (Brooks et al., 2020;Fleer, 2019). ...
... However, including digital technology as part of pedagogical endeavours is not simply a matter of educators' willingness to apply new ways of acting with or having access to digital tools; it is a multi-layered process of professional change that includes both the educator's mindset and pedagogical dispositions informing new teaching and learning strategies (cf. Redecker, 2017). This evokes questions of how educators can make sense of present complex demands on enhancing their digital competence to improve technological integration in their everyday educational activities. ...
... The types of metaphors identified in the data can be regarded as rather generic. In relating the educators' initial experiences to the use of digital technology in educational settings, they can be aligned with previous studies (Redecker, 2017;Dorst, 2015;Phelps et al., 2011) and as such be made possible to be understood and applied in similar research contexts. Our main contribution involves the benefits of the making-breaking-re-creating model, with the three constituents together forming an opportunity space. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter reports on the emerging findings during the first year of a design- and inquiry-based research project called Kindergarten Teacher as a Researcher. The project attempts to implement a design for collaboration and knowledge co-creation through a workshop methodology called Exploration and Pedagogical Innovation Laboratories (EX-PED-LAB). The project was funded by the Research Council of Norway as a starting grant for the common initiative of the Agency for Kindergartens (Bergen City, Norway) and the KINDknow Research Centre [BARNkunne – Senter for barnehageforskning], located at Western Norway University of Applied Sciences (HVL). The goal of the workshop laboratory was twofold: (1) to support early childhood educational leaders and staff in enhancing the quality of kindergartens in close collaboration with researchers and (2) to research three areas of common interest: the play, exploration, and learning environment; collaboration with families; and leadership and governance. This chapter highlights a set of features for success, as well as takeaway points for the further development of the workshop methodology, tailored to future early childhood partnership research programmes. Drawing on the case of the EX-PED-LAB project, the chapter seeks to describe the features of the success of and barriers to collaborative explorative processes and knowledge-creating practices in practices-developing research. These insights will be beneficial for further investigations, consolidations, and refinements of the workshop methodology.
... As we witness the evolution of digital technologies, we can find researchers who explore the potential of digital tools for the improvement of teaching and learning. Digitalization is at the core of all the educational plans for the next few years [5], and assessment is one of the topics to be addressed when we study the educational potential of ICT, as we can check both in the European models DigCompEdu and DigCompOrg [6][7][8], where assessment is incidentally one of the areas that takes advantage of the use of digital technologies. ...
... The research carried out and presented in this article has shown the importance of assessing oral skills in English and the need for the improvement of teaching competence to do so. These issues are related to the main objectives of digital competence of educators in the international context, as we have explained [2,3,[6][7][8]. ...
... Teachers participating in the needs analysis have stated that they need to learn new forms of evaluation and how to use technology and resource banks for this purpose, one of the main areas in the DigCompEdu European model [6]. This is the second of our objectives and the main purpose of the AROSE web tool. ...
Article
Full-text available
The assessment of oral skills in the learning process of a foreign language is very important for promoting the improvement of these competences. Furthermore, digital tools can be useful for making this task easier for teachers and promoting their collaboration based on professional online communities. In this article, we present the AROSE platform, a new digital tool developed to help secondary education teachers assess their students’ oral skills in English as a foreign language. To evaluate this platform, we have promoted an international online community of secondary education teachers in a project funded by the Erasmus+ programme. The research has been developed using a design-based research methodology. Three different iterations of the platform design process were carried out. We have used a mixed method combining focus groups (of both teachers and experts), observation forms, and questionnaires for teachers. The main results obtained demonstrate the need among teachers to integrate technology to improve the evaluation process. The AROSE platform successfully caters to this need, as demonstrated by the significant data on the use and satisfaction of its users.
... Digital technology became an integral element of higher education, impacting all aspects of student learning (Selwyn, 2016;Henderson et al., 2017;Barak, 2018). This includes promoting global citizenship (Choi et al., 2017;Redecker, 2017;Nikou & Economides, 2018), fostering collaboration (Sosa Neira et al., 2017;Oliver & de St Jorre, 2018), social networking (Schindler et al., 2017;Redmond et al., 2018), supporting student-teacher communication (Atmacasoy & Aksu, 2018), and improving student self-efficacy (Alioon & Delialioğlu, 2017). At the same time, some of the literature on educational technology remains cautious, considering technology, like any other tool in education, would fail to promote improved learning experiences to learners unless used wisely and effectively by effective users (Tamim et al., 2011;Popenici, 2013;OECD, 2015;Englund et al., 2017). ...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated a digital reform initiative, rated excellent by the government, of one higher education institution (HEI) in an Arab State in the Gulf. The focus of the study was to develop a digital typology, while exploring the leadership attributes that characterized the core leadership team, as they accomplished the migration towards a digital culture in one year, within a context where faculty members showed resistance against digitalization. The study was conducted immediately after the implementation of the initiative that took place over the course of one year, just before the Covid-19 pandemic. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with all the six key individuals in the leadership team who led this initiative. Data was analyzed using content-based analysis. Findings of the study were used to synthesize a 5D typology for digital leadership attributes: (1) Digital competence; (2) Digital culture; (3) Digital Differentiation; (4) Digital governance; and (5) Digital advocacy. The paper provides in depth discussion how these attributes supported the adaptive ability of a Higher Education Institution towards accepting digitalization.
... During 2015-2019, with the development of digital education and the deep integration of digital technologies represented by artificial intelligence, blockchain, cloud computing, and big data in the field of education, the need strengthen the capacity of digital governance in education became more urgent. Therefore, the research related to digital education governance, digital technology, and digital capacity during this period has become a focus of researchers' attention [92][93][94]. Since 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the widespread use of new digital technologies in the education field, new learning environments have been innovated, changing the way of educational information dissemination while triggering educational teaching model changes. ...
Article
Full-text available
With the rapid development of emerging technologies such as big data, artificial intelligence, and blockchain and their wide application in education, digital education has received widespread attention in the international education field. The outbreak of COVID-19 in December 2019 further catalyzed the digitalization process in various industries, including education, and forced the education system to carry out digital reform and innovation. Digital education transformation has become a new hotspot of great interest in countries around the world and a major direction for education reform practices. Therefore, to better understand the status of global digital education research, this study uses CiteSpace (6.1.R2) visual analysis software to visualize and quantitatively analyze the literature on digital education research in the social science citation index (SSCI). First, the basic information of digital education was analyzed in terms of annual publication volume, authors, countries, and research institutions. Secondly, the main fields, basic contents, and research hotspots of digital education research were analyzed by keyword co-occurrence analysis mapping and keyword time zone mapping. Finally, the research frontiers and development trends of digital education between 2000 and 6 September 2022 were analyzed by cocitation clustering and citations. The results show that, based on the changes in annual publication volume, we can divide the development pulse of the digital education research field into three stages: the budding stage (2000–2006), the slow development stage (2007–2017), and the rapid development stage (6 September 2018–2022); there are 26 core authors in this field of research, among which Selwyn N has the highest number of publications; the USA, England, Spain, Australia, and Germany have the highest number of publications; Open Univ is the institution with the most publications; digital education’s research hotspots are mainly focused on interdisciplinary field practice research and adaptive education research based on big data support. The research frontiers are mainly related to five areas: interdisciplinary development, educational equity, digital education practice, digital education evaluation, and digital education governance. This paper systematically analyzes the latest developments in global digital education research, and objectively predicts that human–computer interdisciplinary teaching models and smart education may become a future development trend of digital education. The findings of this study are useful to readers for understanding the full picture of digital education research so that researchers can conduct more in-depth and targeted research to promote better development of digital education.
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