Article

Maturity and Conceptual Dimensions of Supply Chain Management: Establishing a Structural Model

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... Their model aims to reduce supply chain costs, including variable transportation and carbon emission costs arising from shipment problems. Sartori and Frederico [2017] discussed and identified three categories as regards the maturity of supply chain management. These include management components (processes management, technology and tools, performance measurement and risk and project management), supply chain structure (collaboration, strategic focus, responsiveness and environmental resources), and business process. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: In recent years, organizational maturity has disseminated its concepts to various management domains, for instance, Supply Chain Management (SCM). The present paper is an attempt to review the developments in the realm of SCM over the past two decades. In the domain of SCM maturity, different models, dimensions (areas) and approaches are advanced for maturity measurements. Methods: Research studies conducted and presented in the literature, including papers on conference proceedings, articles in journals and technical reports, are reviewed; the review covers a time span from the early 1990s to the present time (2019). Also provided in this review are the previous models, dimensions (areas/ elements), and approaches for measuring SCM maturity techniques. Additionally, research gaps are identified, analysed and discussed. Results: After reviewing, the research studies in the field and the dimensions found in the works are placed into different categories. The current study aims to present a review of the literature, ultimately providing help to researchers in realizing gaps and opportunities in the field of SCM maturity. There are also different approaches to supply chain maturity models. For example, one approach may solely focus on integration while another might concentrate on SC visibility and traceability. In more recent research studies, more attention is paid to such specific areas of supply chain as flexibility and sustainability. The results of the present paper point to gaps, which indicate that more research works are required. In addition, it is assumed that the materials presented here may help establish more comprehensive SCM maturity models. Conclusions: It is seen that supply chain management is rapidly shifting toward e-SCM, and some other technologies like blockchain. Also, supply chain sustainability comes to the fore as a significant approach. It should be reminded that other strategic features of supply chains like leanness, agility, resilience, sustainability, integration, green and reverse logistics etc., also play their own role in the field. Combining these strategic features can be an effective idea for developing more comprehensive models for SCM maturity. To sum up, the results of the present survey indicate that the published works need more adequacy and treatment research, and that more research is called for to bridge the gaps in the realm of SCM maturity.
Article
Full-text available
The European Green Deal aims to make Europe climate neutral by 2050. According to this ambitious plan, 50% of greenhouse gas emissions are to be saved through a wide implementation of a circular economy. With supply chains responsible for four-fifths of greenhouse gas emissions, their role in the transition from linearity to a circular economy, and thus in the successful implementation of circular systems, is critical and requires the attention of academia, policymakers, and practitioners. Maturity models are suitable for monitoring, assessing, and evaluating the transformation process and determining the status quo of a supply chain. However, as the implementation of circular supply chains is still in its infancy, circular maturity frameworks at the supply chain level are not available yet. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to conceptualize a framework for analyzing the maturity level of circular economy adoption in the supply chain context. From an extensive and systematic literature review of overall 1,372 articles on supply chains, circular economy and maturity the following findings can be drawn: (i) circular economy and circular supply chains are massively growing research streams; (ii) the link between circular economy, supply chains and maturity assessment is so far missing; (iii) three constructs (organization, products, processes) characterize and influence circular supply chain maturity; (iv) a 3-layered maturity grid covering six archetypal elements of the circular economy enables the assessment of a circular supply chain maturity. The developed circular supply chain maturity framework paves the way for circular economy adoption at supply chain level by understanding current level of circular maturity and thus supporting the circular economy implementation process at supply chain level.
Article
Full-text available
Supply chains have an important role in the competition on the current market. The understanding of maturity and its dimensions in terms of supply chain management –SCM can lead companies to better levels of performance. This paper aims to present findings on supply chain management maturity showing a theoretical model developed from the literature review and its application on three case studies. A systematic approach was used to the literature review. Due to the lack in the literature related to the purpose of this paper a long period was considered for the search of references linked to maturity of supply chain management. The approaches for SCM maturity proposed on the literature suggest different e common dimensions which drive a maturity of SCM. Thesedimensions can be consolidated in eleven key-dimensions of maturity for SCM. Also, it is possible to verify that as the maturity of SCM evolves to an advanced level more integrated and capable a supply chain becomes. The application of this theoretical model through case studies could confirm the framework proposed and generated new directions of research. The theoretical model was applied in three case studies from different segment of industry and with different level of maturity. A qualitative approach was more adequate for this initial step aligned with this exploratory purpose. More qualitative and quantitative studies need to be done to obtain more evidences from the field and from other different segment of industry. This theoretical model is unique taking into consideration that it was developed from various perspectives of maturity proposed on the literature. This same structure can be applied in more field researches seeking better understandings about maturity of SCM. Also, it can be used by practitioners with the purpose to get a better view of SCM maturity dimensions and allow establishing new directions in terms of supply chain decisions.
Article
Full-text available
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine differences among industry classes and supply chain positions in order to gain insight into quality management program maturity across industries and within supply chains. Design/methodology/approach – Data for comparison in this study comes from an e-mail survey of professionals across the USA, employed primarily in sourcing or logistics (i.e. Institute for Supply Management (ISM) and Council for Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP)). Findings – This study found that quality maturity varies by industry class. While prior studies have found differences by industry class, they have been limited to at most three classes, while this study examined 17 classes. This study also examines quality maturity by supply chain position, with the finding that quality maturity differed by supply chain position depending on how position is defined. Questions are raised regarding the proper characterization of supply chain position. Research limitations/implications – The sample group represents members in only two professional groups, ISM and CSCMP. Not all industry groups or supply chain positions were well-represented due to some small sub-group sizes. Practical implications – Quality program maturity is generally not uniform and there are potentially many opportunities for substantial improvement across various sectors by specific industry. Partnering with suppliers is a recommended approach for sectors lagging in quality maturity. Originality/value – This research extends the examination of quality management practice in the supply chain by studying a large number of industry classes and supply chain positions and assesses differences in quality maturity across these classes and positions.
Article
Full-text available
Purpose – From a continuous improvement perspective, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the levels of maturity attained by organisations in reporting their supply chain (as well as non-supply chain) sustainability initiatives. It also investigates the extent to which supply chain sustainability (SCS) disclosure varies between different business sectors, as well as the degree of interconnection between various sustainability criteria. Subsequently, it proposes an improvement framework for reporting and implementing sustainability initiatives across the supply chain. Design/methodology/approach – To carry out this investigation, corporate sustainability reports of selected companies in ten different industries are downloaded and assessed. The paper uses content analysis and principal component analysis to study the disclosure maturity levels of the different industrial sectors. Findings – The paper's results show that the disclosure maturity level is higher in business-to-consumer industries than in business-to-business industries on both the social and environmental dimensions. The paper also shows that the highly polluting energy sector is the least advanced in disclosing SCS initiatives. Generally speaking, there is no clear pattern in the way organisations disclose sustainability information. The conclusion is that sustainability disclosure is not yet homogeneously structured across different business sectors and organisations are yet to attain the “adult” maturity age. Originality/value – Very few researchers can claim to have investigated the maturity levels of SCS disclosure from a continuous improvement perspective. This is probably due to the absence of a universally accepted framework that clearly defines the scope of sustainability. The paper tries to fill this gap by proposing a framework that would not only help researchers to study SCS and stakeholders to read sustainability reports, but would also enable practitioners to improve the quality and reliability of the data disclosed, especially as they apply to the supply chain.
Article
Full-text available
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to propose a quick maturity test to assist a company's development of a supply chain operations strategy. Maturity tests and models have been developed within several areas, but there is a lack of maturity tests targeting supply chain operations. Design/methodology/approach – A literature review on maturity models is carried out in order to build the structure of the test, while a literature review on best practices in supply chain management is the basis for the test content. Findings – The proposed maturity test is an audit scheme built on best practice statements within seven key strategic decision areas – strategy, control, processes, materials, resources, information and organisation. The test is designed with simplicity as a key feature and takes only one hour to complete. The test results are the input to strategic decisions regarding use of best practices in supply chain operations. Practical implications – Supply chain managers ask for a simple and quick tool that can be used as an eye-opener and a compass early in the development process of the supply chain operations strategy. The proposed test has a proven potential to point out directions for supply chain improvement areas. Originality/value – There is a need for a quick assessment tool for mapping the maturity of a company's supply chain operations. The proposed test is a potential answer to this need.
Article
Full-text available
Current models of organizational strategy and structure fail to meet the challenges of the information age. Based on field study, the authors conceptualize an architecture, or guide, for virtual organizing that focuses on the importance of knowledge and intellect in creating value. Information technology lies at the heart of this business model for the twenty-first century. The authors' approach incorporates three interdependent vectors: customer interaction deals with new challenges and opportunities for company-to-customer interactions; asset configuration focuses on creating and deploying intellectual assets while sourcing physical assets from a complex business network; and knowledge leverage is concerned with opportunities for leveraging diverse sources of expertise within and across organizational boundaries. Each of the vectors in turn has three stages, Stage one focuses on task units such as customer service, purchasing, or new product development. Stage two focuses on coordinating activities to create superior value. Stage three focuses on the interorganizational network to design and leverage interdependent communities for innovation and growth. Each vector raises a distinct series of questions for managers. The overall challenge for companies is to harmonize the three vectors and to undertake external benchmarking when experimenting with different approaches to design.
Article
Full-text available
Purpose – Without the adoption of a uniform agreed upon definition of supply chain management (SCM), researchers and practitioners will not be able to “advance the theory and practice” of the discipline. An integrated definition of SCM would greatly benefit researchers' efforts to study the phenomenon of SCM and those practitioners attempting to implement SCM. This paper aims to address these issues. Design/methodology/approach – Using the qualitative analysis software NVivo, this study examines 166 definitions of SCM that have appeared in the literature to determine important components of an integrated definition of SCM. Findings – Three broad themes of SCM are identified, including: activities; benefits; and constituents/components. An encompassing definition of SCM is developed from the qualitative analysis of these definitions. Research limitations/implications – While a large number of SCM definitions have been included in the research design, there may be additional definitions that are excluded given the very large number of SCM publications. Practical implications – A consensus definition of SCM will allow researchers to more precisely develop theory and practitioners to identify the scope and boundaries of SCM. Originality/value – This paper is the first attempt to include a large number of SCM definitions for the purpose of developing a consensus definition of the concept. Previous literature has included only a subset of published SCM definitions.
Article
Full-text available
This study introduces an empirical model of supply chain maturity and assesses its impact upon performance. Findings suggest that supply chain maturity is multi-dimensional including the areas of planning, sourcing, making, delivering, new product development, and returning. Valid and reliable measures, scales and supply chain maturity constructs were formulated and significant positive links found with multiple objective performance measures. The supply chain maturity framework is thus concluded to be robust for answering questions relating to where a supply chain is in developmental terms and what may be done to continue improving upon the design. Possible areas for further research and implications for managers are also raised.
Article
Full-text available
This article aims to discuss theoretically as performance measurement can support the process of continuous improvement. Firstly, a theoretical revision was accomplished on the issues performance measurement and continuous improvement. Soon after, the importance of performance measurement was examined as critical element of the process of continuous improvement. As main result, it was proprosed a theoretical model that defines the basic framework of the performance measurement system for each level of continuous improvement.
Article
Full-text available
The concept of process maturity proposes that a process has a lifecycle that is assessed by the extent to which the process is explicitly defined, managed, measured and controlled. A maturity model assumes that progress towards goal achievement comes in stages. The supply chain maturity model presented in this paper is based on concepts developed by researchers over the past two decades. The Software Engineering Institute has also applied the concept of process maturity to the software development process in the form of the capability maturity model. This paper examines the relationship between supply chain management process maturity and performance, and provides a supply chain management process maturity model for enhanced supply chain performance.
Article
Full-text available
Practitioners and educators have variously addressed the concept of supply chain management (SCM) as an extension of logistics, the same as logistics, or as an all-encompassing approach to business integration. Based on a review of the literature and management practice, it is clear that there is a need for some level of coordination of activities and processes within and between organizations in the supply chain that extends beyond logistics. We believe that this is what should be called SCM. This article proposes a conceptual model that provides guidance for future supply chain decision-making and research.
Article
Full-text available
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the uptake of supply chain integration (SCI) principles internationally and the resultant integration maturity. Design/methodology/approach – A rigorous supply chain diagnostics methodology called the Quick Scan is used to assess the integration maturity of 72 value streams located in New Zealand, Thailand and the UK. Findings – The majority of the organisations studied are struggling to turn the SCI concept into reality. Supply chains on average are poorly integrated. However, there exist a handful of exemplar cases that provide guidance; levels of integration maturity appear not to differ internationally. Research limitations/implications – Only three nations are compared, hence the sample is not fully representative of all countries and industries. There is a significant gap between supply chain rhetoric and practice; clear guidance on how to enable effective integration is required. National settings do not appear to affect the extent of application of supply chain management concepts. Practical implications – SCI is a very difficult undertaking. Indifferent practice is the norm. If organisations can attain even the middle ground of internal integration they will outperform many of their competitors. Originality/value – The paper presents an international benchmark of SCI maturity involving three triangulated measures of supply chain performance.
Article
Full-text available
The information technology (IT) industry is characterized by rapid innovation and intense competition. To survive, IT firms must develop high quality software products on time and at low cost. A key issue is whether high levels of quality can be achieved without adversely impacting cycle time and effort. Conventional beliefs hold that processes to improve software quality can be implemented only at the expense of longer cycle times and greater development effort. However, an alternate view is that quality improvement, faster cycle time, and effort reduction can be simultaneously attained by reducing defects and rework. In this study, we empirically investigate the relationship between process maturity, quality, cycle time, and effort for the development of 30 software products by a major IT firm. We find that higher levels of process maturity as assessed by the Software Engineering Institute's Capability Maturity Model\trademark are associated with higher product quality, but also with increases in development effort. However, our findings indicate that the reductions in cycle time and effort due to improved quality outweigh the increases from achieving higher levels of process maturity. Thus, the net effect of process maturity is reduced cycle time and development effort.
Thesis
Supply chains are becoming increasingly important for companies to survive in today's competitive market. Theories and methods that contributing to the improvement of its management are important elements for research and development in the field of Industrial Engineering. Considering the performance measurement systems as one of these elements, this thesis aims to propose an adequacy model of performance measurement systems and its maturity to the maturity levels of supply chain management due to the lack of a study that shows the relationship between these two elements. For this were studied the performance measurement systems and its maturity as well as the maturity models for supply chain management enabling to build a theoretical model of relationship between these two elements. Using the multiple case method applied on three different analyze units it was possible to analyze the theoretical model purposed. As the main results of this research, in most of cases, was identified the existence of a relationship between the maturity of performance measurement system and maturity of supply chain management, although not always all elements of maturity of these two elements are in the same level of development. As contribution, this model aims to present a new approach to the theory of the performance measurement systems in the supply chain management, as well as, to provide to the practitioners the correct alignment between the maturity of supply chain management and maturity of performance measurement systems.
Article
This study has been conducted to analyze the relationship of supply chain management company with competitive advantage and corporate financial performance. The manufacturing and industrial companies of Hormozgan Province have been studied in this research. To study the variables of the research, three components have been considered for each of the variables. Questionnaires have been used in this study for data collection and evaluation of the relationship between the variables. In this regard, a questionnaire consisting of 24 questions was designed given to the respondents. In this study, all senior managers, middle managers and operations managers in manufacturing and industrial companies of Hormozgan Province were considered as the population and the sample size was calculated 123 based on Cochran Formula. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) has been used in this study for examining the relationships between the variables and LISREL Software has been utilized for this purpose. After reviewing the results obtained from the questionnaires, the two hypotheses of the research were confirmed and it was shown that there is a statistically significant relationship between supply chain management, competitive advantage and financial performance of the company.
Article
For years, researchers and practitioners have primarily investigated the various processes within manufacturing supply chains individually. Recently, however, there has been increasing attention placed on the performance, design, and analysis of the supply chain as a whole. This attention is largely a result of the rising costs of manufacturing, the shrinking resources of manufacturing bases, shortened product life cycles, the leveling of the playing field within manufacturing, and the globalization of market economies. The objectives of this paper are to: (1) provide a focused review of literature in multi-stage supply chain modeling and (2) define a research agenda for future research in this area.
Article
Resumo Atualmente, a competitividade no meio empresarial se apresenta no âmbito da cadeia de suprimento. A integração estratégica de processos e de atividades entre os membros de uma cadeia de suprimento tornam-se fatores-chave de sucesso. Fundamentando-se na evolução conceitual da logística obtém-se a evolução dos relacionamentos entre os membros de uma cadeia de suprimento. Combinando modelos de sistemas de medição do desempenho desenvolveu-se uma matriz que poderá ser utilizada para medir os níveis de maturidade de relacionamentos entre participantes de uma cadeia de suprimento. Este artigo apresenta uma contribuição teórico-conceitual, propondo um modelo referencial para análise de níveis de maturidade do relacionamento entre membros de uma cadeia de suprimento. O modelo referencial combina sistemas de medição do desempenho e estabelece como níveis de maturidade as Palavras-chave: evolução conceitual da logística; sistemas de medição do desempenho; níveis de maturidade de relacionamentos; gerenciamento da cadeia de suprimento ampliada. 1. Introdução Considerando um ambiente competitivo global, constata-se que os mercados em todos os setores estão ficando muito mais exigentes. Isso resulta na necessidade de empresas unirem esforços, formando cadeias através de parcerias entre fornecedores, fabricantes e distribuidores, para produzir bens e serviços que agreguem valor para o consumidor final.
Article
Management is on the verge of a major breakthrough in understanding how industrial company success depends on the interactions between the flows of information, materi-als, money, manpower, and capital equipment. The way these five flow systems interlock to amplify one another and to cause change and fluctuation will form the basis for antici-pating the effects of decisions, policies, organizational forms, and investment choices." (For-rester 1958, p. 37) Forrester introduced a theory of distribution management that recognized the integrated nature of organizational relationships. Because organizations are so intertwined, he argued that system dynam-ics can influence the performance of functions such as research, engineering, sales, and promotion.
Article
Purpose – Outsourcing of non-core activities and the subsequent vertical disintegration within manufacturing organisations have necessitated the need for process integration in the supply chain. The purpose of this paper is to develop a maturity scale to assess supply chain integration and hence improvement in supply chain performance. Design/methodology/approach – The research involved carrying out a questionnaire survey of UK manufacturing companies. In total, 29 responses were analysed. Findings – The insight gained from the research is that the “soft” collaborative issues rather than the “hard” technological issues are the main drivers to improved supply chain performance. Most of the companies surveyed are still grappling with internal process integration with very few companies achieving closer integration with their customers. Practical implications – Empirical evidence is found about an organisation's true stage of supply chain integration which affects its performance. Hard and soft variables or certain combinations of these do have a positive or negative effect on organisational performance. Originality/value – A maturity scale is developed to capture an organisation's stage of supply chain integration. This scale also draws on relationships with organisational performance. As a maturity scale, it also shows direction or migratory paths to higher stages of supply chain integration.
Article
Increasing global cooperation, vertical disintegration and a focus on core activities have led to the notion that firms are links in a networked supply chain. This strategic viewpoint has created the challenge of coordinating effectively the entire supply chain, from upstream to downstream activities. While supply chains have existed ever since businesses have been organized to bring products and services to customers, the notion of their competitive advantage, and consequently supply chain management (SCM), is a relatively recent thinking in management literature. Although research interests in and the importance of SCM are growing, scholarly materials remain scattered and disjointed, and no research has been directed towards a systematic identification of the core initiatives and constructs involved in SCM. Thus, the purpose of this study is to develop a research framework that improves understanding of SCM and stimulates and facilitates researchers to undertake both theoretical and empirical investigation on the critical constructs of SCM, and the exploration of their impacts on supply chain performance. To this end, we analyse over 400 articles and synthesize the large, fragmented body of work dispersed across many disciplines such as purchasing and supply, logistics and transportation, marketing, organizational dynamics, information management, strategic management, and operations management literature.
Article
Interest in supply chain management has steadily increased since the 1980s when firms saw the benefits of collaborative relationships within and beyond their own organization. Firms are finding that they can no longer compete effectively in isolation of their suppliers or other entities in the supply chain. A number of definitions of supply chain management have been proposed in the literature and in practice. This paper defines the concept of supply chain management and discusses its historical evolution. The term does not replace supplier partnerships, nor is it a description of the logistics function. The competitive importance of linking a firm’s supply chain strategy to its overall business strategy and some practical guidelines are offered for successful supply chain management.
Common to all manufacturing companies is the need to control the flow of material from suppliers, through the value adding processes and distribution channels, to customers. The supply chain is the connected series of activities which is concerned with planning, co-ordinating and controlling material, parts and finished goods from supplier to customer. Traditionally, the flow of material has been considered only at an operational level. No longer, however, can the potential of integrating the supply chain be ignored. Companies that manage the supply chain as a single entity and ensure the appropriate use of tools and techniques in order to meet the needs of the market, will not get left behind in the fight for survival.
Looks, in depth, at corporate logistics strategy, particularly withregard to the USA. Discusses strategy referring to a general concept ofoperations guiding all activities towards an ultimate goal - globalrather than local. Itemizes some major American firms and theirattitudes and considers their policies and results. Shows supply chainmanagement and cycle time compression to be complementing logisticsstrategies for progressive US firms.
Article
The publication of the Starkey and Madan (2001) report represents a timely and valuable contribution to an ongoing debate across a range of applied disciplines, concerning the nature and purpose of social research. The call for stakeholder alignment, culminating in the production of new knowledge that is both theoretically and methodologically rigorous on the one hand, and socially relevant on the other, is, in our view, to be greatly welcomed. However, the Mode 2 approach advocated by Starkey and Madan will not satisfy these fundamental requirements. Drawing on recent analyses of the nature, causes and consequences of the academic-practitioner divide in the subfield of industrial, work and organizational psychology, we offer an alternative, four-fold taxonomy of the varieties of managerial knowledge. Within our alternative framework, research that is low on rigour but high on relevance (a likely consequence of the wholesale adoption of a Mode 2 approach) is characterized as ‘Popularist Science’. ‘Pedantic Science’, by contrast, is high on rigour but low on relevance, while ‘Puerile Science’ meets neither requirement. Only ‘Pragmatic Science’ will meet the twin imperatives of rigour and relevance. Whilst it is highly desirable that Pragmatic Science should dominate the management field, there are considerable barriers that impede its widespread adoption at the present time, not least the limited availability of researchers who possess the requisite sociopolitical and methodological competencies. The immediate imperative that has to be addressed, therefore, is the question of how best to close this competency gap, a fundamental precondition of stakeholder realignment.
Article
This paper presents the project management process maturity (PM) 2 model that determines and positions an organization's relative project management level with other organizations. The comprehensive model follows a systematic approach to establish an organization's current project management level. Each maturity level consists of major project management characteristics, factors, and processes. The model evolves from functionally driven organizational practices to project driven organization that incorporates continuous project learning. The (PM) 2 model provides an orderly, disciplined process to achieve higher levels of project management maturity.
Conference Paper
SCMM (Supply Chain Maturity Model) is a techniques and tools system that supports supply chain innovation by continuous improvement based on evaluating supply chain maturity and performance. The key to its effectiveness depends on the comprehensive and accurate evaluation of supply chain. Three typical SCMMs are reviewed and evaluated in this paper. And then three closely interrelated components of supply chain are put forward based on a survey of several firms. And all of them are viewed as 3-dimension perspective for evaluating supply chain. After that, a new SCMM, 3D-SCMM, is presented, in which the concept of 3D-Supply Chain Maturity is defined and three sub-models are developed for evaluating and improving supply chain according to 3-dimension perspective.
Article
Successful supply chain management requires cross-functional integration and marketing must play a critical role. The challenge is to determine how to successfully accomplish this integration. We present a framework for supply chain management as well as questions for how it might be implemented and questions for future research. Case studies conducted at several companies and involving multiple members of supply chains are used to illustrate the concepts described.
Article
Undertaking a review of the literature is an important part of any research project. The researcher both maps and assesses the relevant intellectual territory in order to specify a research question which will further develop the knowledge base. However, traditional 'narrative' reviews frequently lack thoroughness, and in many cases are not undertaken as genuine pieces of investigatory science. Consequently they can lack a means for making sense of what the collection of studies is saying. These reviews can be biased by the researcher and often lack rigour. Furthermore, the use of reviews of the available evidence to provide insights and guidance for intervention into operational needs of practitioners and policymakers has largely been of secondary importance. For practitioners, making sense of a mass of often-contradictory evidence has become progressively harder. The quality of evidence underpinning decision-making and action has been questioned, for inadequate or incomplete evidence seriously impedes policy formulation and implementation. In exploring ways in which evidence-informed management reviews might be achieved, the authors evaluate the process of systematic review used in the medical sciences. Over the last fifteen years, medical science has attempted to improve the review process by synthesizing research in a systematic, transparent, and reproducible manner with the twin aims of enhancing the knowledge base and informing policymaking and practice. This paper evaluates the extent to which the process of systematic review can be applied to the management field in order to produce a reliable knowledge stock and enhanced practice by developing context-sensitive research. The paper highlights the challenges in developing an appropriate methodology.
Article
Few executives question the idea that by redesigning business processes--work that runs from end to end across an enterprise--they can achieve extraordinary improvements in cost, quality, speed, profitability, and other key areas Yet in spite of their intentions and investments, many executives flounder, unsure about what exactly needs to be changed, by how much, and when. As a result, many organizations make little progress--if any at all--in their attempts to transform business processes. Michael Hammer has spent the past five years working with a group of leading companies to develop the Process and Enterprise Maturity Model (PEMM), a new framework that helps executives comprehend, formulate, and assess process-based transformation efforts. He has identified two distinct groups of characteristics that are needed for business processes to perform exceptionally well over a long period of time. Process enablers, which affect individual processes, determine how well a process is able to function. They are mutually interdependent--if any are missing, the others will be ineffective. However, enablers are not enough to develop high-performance processes; they only provide the potential to deliver high performance. A company must also possess or establish organizational capabilities that allow the business to offer a supportive environment. Together, the enablers and the capabilities provide an effective way for companies to plan and evaluate process-based transformations. PEMM is different from other frameworks, such as Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI), because it applies to all industries and all processes. The author describes how several companies--including Michelin, CSAA, Tetra Pak, Shell, Clorox, and Schneider National--have successfully used PEMM in various ways and at different stages to evaluate the progress of their process-based transformation efforts.
Supply Chain Systems: Are You Ready? Information Strategy: The Executive's
  • J B Ayers
  • D M Malmberg
AYERS, J. B.; MALMBERG, D. M. Supply Chain Systems: Are You Ready? Information Strategy: The Executive's Journal, p. 18-27, 2002. Available at http://ayersconsulti006Eg.com/download/SC%20System s% 20-%20Are%20You%20Ready.pdf.
Projeto de pesquisa: propostas metodológicas. 20. ed. Petropolis, RJ: Vozes
  • A J P Barros
  • N A S Lehfeld
BARROS, A. J. P.; LEHFELD, N. A. S. Projeto de pesquisa: propostas metodológicas. 20. ed. Petropolis, RJ: Vozes, 2010. 127 p.
Supply chain maturity and performance in Brazil
  • Marcos Paulo Oliveira
  • Valadares De
OLIVEIRA, Marcos Paulo Valadares de. Supply chain maturity and performance in Brazil. Supply Chain Management: An International Journal13/4 (2008) 272-282.
Tese (Doutorado em Administração
  • M P Oliveira
OLIVEIRA, M. P. V. Modelo de Maturidade de Processos em Cadeias de Suprimentos: Precedências e os Pontos-Chave de Transição. 2009. Tese (Doutorado em Administração)Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, 2009.
Competitive Advantage of Best in Class Supply Chains. Pennsylvania: PMG
  • Performance Measurement Group-Pmg
PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT GROUP-PMG. Competitive Advantage of Best in Class Supply Chains. Pennsylvania: PMG, 2007. Available at http://www.pmgbenchmarking.com/public/survey/ advantagesofbic.pdf.
  • Sei-Software Engineering Institute
SEI-SOFTWARE ENGINEERING INSTITUTE.CMMI Models and Reports. Pittisburgh, 2009.Avaiableat: <http://www.sei.cmu.edu/cmmi/models/>.
Gerenciamento da Cadeia de Suprimentos: Logística Empresarial
  • Ronald H Ballou
BALLOU, Ronald H. Gerenciamento da Cadeia de Suprimentos: Logística Empresarial. Porto Alegre: Bookman, 2001
Logistics and Supply Chain Management
  • Martin Christopher
CHRISTOPHER, Martin. Logistics and Supply Chain Management, 3rd ed. London: Pearson Education, 2005.
Competitive Advantage of Best in Class Supply Chains. Pennsylvania: PMG
  • Performance
  • Group -Pmg
PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT GROUP -PMG. Competitive Advantage of Best in Class Supply Chains. Pennsylvania: PMG, 2007. Available at http://www.pmgbenchmarking.com/public/survey/ advantagesofbic.pdf.
  • Sei -Software Engineering
  • Institute
SEI -SOFTWARE ENGINEERING INSTITUTE.CMMI Models and Reports. Pittisburgh, 2009.Avaiableat: <http://www.sei.cmu.edu/cmmi/models/>.