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New data on the distribution of Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann (Heteroptera: Coreidae: Coreinae: Anisoscelini), including the first record of the species in Georgia

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Abstract

The presence of Leptoglossus occidentalis in Albania is confirmed. The first record of the species from Georgia and a recent record in Hamburg, Germany are reported.
Scientic Note
New data on the distribution of Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann (Heteroptera:
Coreidae: Coreinae: Anisoscelini), including the rst record of the species in Georgia
Nuevos datos sobre la distribución de Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann (Heteroptera:
Coreidae: Coreinae: Anisoscelini), incluyendo la primera cita de la especie en Georgia
Torsten van der Heyden1
1 Immenweide 83, D-22523 Hamburg, Germany. E-mail: tmvdh@web.de
ZooBank: urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:D03190A1-9773-4126-891A-BA3338A253DF
Abstract. The presence of Leptoglossus occidentalis in Albania is conrmed. The rst record of the
species from Georgia and a recent record in Hamburg, Germany are reported.
Key words: Chorology, Eurasia, Hemiptera.
Resumen. Se conrma la presencia de Leptoglossus occidentalis en Albania. Se presentan la primera
cita de la especie de Georgia y una cita reciente en Hamburgo, Alemania.
Palabras clave: Corología, Eurasia, Hemiptera.
Recently, Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann, 1910, commonly known as the Western
Conifer Seed Bug, was reported from Albania for the rst time (van der Heyden 2018b).
This record was based on a single specimen found dead south-west of Vlorë in southern
Albania.
The presence of the species in Albania can be conrmed: On 3-XI-2018, Aleksander
Golemaj photographed a living specimen of L. occidentalis on his balcony on the seventh
oor of a residential building in Vlorë (Fig. 1). Presumably, the specimen was seeking an
overwintering site in the building. This behaviour was mentioned by Fent and Kment
(2011), Kulijer et al. (2017) and Kulijer and Ibrahimi (2017).
As mentioned by van der Heyden (2017, 2018a, 2018b), L. occidentalis has recently
extended its European distribution, in particular in the eastern part of the Mediterranean.
The species is spreading even more eastward. Recently, it was reported from Kazakhstan
for the rst time (Barclay and Nikolaeva 2018).
Another recent nding of L. occidentalis conrms the spread of the species at the boundary
between Europe and Asia: On 28-X-2018, Mathias D’haen photographed a specimen of L.
occidentalis on a terrace outside a building in Borjomi in the Samtskhe-Javakheti region in
south-central Georgia (Fig. 2). The photograph was rst published in the online database
iNaturalist (D’haen 2018). The species probably migrated to Georgia coming from one of
the neighbouring countries Russia or Turkey where it had been found earlier (Fent and
Kment 2011; Gapon 2013; Kulijer et al. 2017; van der Heyden 2017, 2018a). It seems unlikely
that L. occidentalis crossed the Black Sea or the Caspian Sea actively, but the species could
also have been introduced to Georgia by ship.
www.biotaxa.org/rce Revista Chilena de Entomología (2018) 44 (4): 433-435.
Este es un artículo de acceso abierto distribuido bajo los términos de la licencia Creative Commons License (CC BY NC 4.0)
Received 4 November 2018 / Accepted 12 November 2018 / Published online 21 November 2018
Responsible Editor: José Mondaca E.
van der Heyden: New data on the distribution of Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann in Georgia.
434
Figures 1-3. Specimens of Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann, 1910. 1. Vlorë, Albania, 3-XI-2018.
(Photograph: Aleksander Golemaj). 2. Borjomi, Georgia, 28-X-2018. (Photograph: Mathias D’haen).
3. Hamburg, Germany, 8-XI-2018. (Photograph: Torsten van der Heyden).
12
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Revista Chilena de Entomología 44 (4) 2018
435
As L. occidentalis has not been reported from Georgia in scientic publications yet, the
record reported in this note is the rst one for this country.
Furthermore, on 8-XI-2018 a specimen of L. occidentalis was observed and photographed
on the terrace in the author’s backyard in Hamburg in northern Germany (Fig. 3).
Acknowledgements
I would like to thank Aleksander Golemaj (Vlorë, Albania) and Mathias D’haen
(Nagero, Democratic Republic of the Congo) for allowing me to use their photographs of
L. occidentalis to illustrate this paper and for additional information about their ndings.
Literature Cited
Barclay, M. and Nikolaeva, S. (2018) Arrival in Kazakhstan of Leptoglossus occidentalis
(Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Coreidae); a North American invasive species expands 2,500
kilometres to the east. Klapalekiana, 54: 1-3.
D’haen, M. (2018) Western Conifer Seed Bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis). Photograph to be
found on iNaturalist [Online database]. Available from:
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/17901209. (Accessed: 4-XI-2018).
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in Kosovo (Heteroptera: Coreidae). Acta entomologica slovenica, 25(1): 115-118.
van der Heyden, T. (2017) Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann, 1910 (Hemiptera: Heteroptera:
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van der Heyden, T. (2018a) First record of Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann, 1910
(Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Coreidae: Coreinae: Anisoscelini) in the Golan Heights.
Revista gaditana de Entomología, IX(1): 1-3.
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Coreidae: Coreinae: Anisoscelini) in Albania. Revista Chilena de Entomología, 44(3): 355-356.
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