PosterPDF Available

The AuStralian Prehospital care quality IndicatoR projEct (ASPIRE)

Authors:
Poster Board Number I74
The AuStralian Prehospital care quality IndicatoR projEct (ASPIRE)
Robin Pap
Joanna Briggs Institute, University of Adelaide/School of Science & Health, Western Sydney
Unversity, AUSTRALIA
Craig Lockwood
Joanna Briggs Institute, University of Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
Matthew Stephenson
Joanna Briggs Institute, University of Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
Paul Simpson
School of Science & Health, Western Sydney Unversity, AUSTRALIA
Background
ASPIRE aims to develop and test a suite of prehospital care quality indicators (QIs) for the Australian
context. A significant proportion of quality measurement within ambulance services is being
conducted using surrogate, non-clinical indicators such as response time intervals. Although such QIs
may be meaningful in specific patient cohorts, they lack validity as holistic prehospital care QIs. The
paramedicine profession has until recently experienced a lack of research capacity which has led to
paucity of a discipline-specific, scientific evidence-base. Therefore, the performance and quality of
ambulance services has historically been measured using simple, evidence-poor indicators. The
development of a meaningful, evidence-based set of Australian prehospital care QIs is imperative.
Meaningful measurement not only produces data to ensure the maintenance of quality, it also
provides information on whether or not change is effective in achieving improvement.
Methods
ASPIRE uses a methodological, multi-step process for the development and testing of QIs. In phase 1,
the international literature on prehospital care QIs was systematically reviewed using the JBI
methodology for conducting scoping reviews. The objective of this phase was to understand how
quality in the context of prehospital care is being defined and what indicators to measure
prehospital care quality currently exists. In phase 2, a modified RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method
(RAM) will be used to assess the clarity and validity of a list of candidate QIs. The list of candidate QIs
will stem from phase 1 and de novo development. The objective of this phase is to assess which QIs
are appropriate for the Australian context. In phase 3, the developed QIs will be tested in a number
of participating Australian State/Territory Ambulance Services. The objective of this phase is to test
the QIs for acceptability, feasibility and reliability.
Outcome
The project is still in progress and therefore final results are unavailable. However, results from
phase 1 (scoping review) confirm that whilst there is paucity in research aiming to specifically define
prehospital care quality, the attributes of generic healthcare quality definitions appear to be
accepted and applicable to the prehospital context. There is growing interest in developing
prehospital care QIs. However, there is a need for validating existing QIs and de novo development
addressing broader aspects of prehospital care.
It is envisaged that the final list of Australian prehospital care QIs will be useful to Australian
State/Territory Ambulance Services in monitoring and benchmarking their performance and
ultimately provide guidance for quality improvement strategies.
Conclusion
It is anticipated that differences in clinical practice between the State and Territories as well as
dissimilarities in the geographical settings will make the development of a standard set of QIs
challenging. This highlights the importance of aiming for generalisability during QIs development.
Beyond the contribution to academic research in the field of paramedicine and the provision of a
meaningful quality improvement tool for Australian State/Territory Ambulance Services, the project
aspires to ultimately have an impact on the quality of prehospital care that patient receive. The
project may potentially continue by evaluating the final set of QIs by means of a patient and public
involvement process.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.