PosterPDF Available

Design opportunities & limitations of Polyfloss' upcycled polypropylene fibres

Authors:
Design opportunities & limitations of Polyoss upcycled polypropylene bres
Aurélie Mossé, PhD, lecturer
Acknowledgements - This workshop was made possi-
ble by the Polyoss Factory inventors: E. de Visscher and C. Machet, together
with the technical and nancial support of Ecole Nationale Supérieure des
Arts Décoratifs, Paris. E. Fessy and E. Mahé supported the proposal while R.
Schär and P. Renaud warmly welcomed the workshop in their departments.
Finally C. Bigot, P. Blot, C. Porney, I. Rodier-Clergue and S. Verny facilitated this
workshop.
Emile de Visscher, PhD fellow Jean-Francois Bassereau, Professor
Theme: plastic muse - the inspirational characteristics of plastics Results - What is provocative with the PolyossFactory process is the
versatility of its applications as an up-cycled material as well as a product.
Results show that these rst outcomes are complying well with a series of
textile processes including dying, weaving, knitting and felting techniques.
In combination with processes such as laser-cutting, engraving, embossing
thermo or ultra-sonic welding, they open possibilities for a wide range of
surfaces and textures with dierent degrees of shine, softness and rigidity.
Successful explorations lied in the making of non-woven produced through
tufting and thermo-sensitive texturing with the thinest bres [4] or direct-
ly by the entangling of the akes on a knitted structure during the fabrica-
tion process [9]. The making of a woven composite combining linen and
polypropilene also demonstrates a lot of potential in the area of 3D textiles,
allowing to sculpt and rigidify parts of the fabric thanks to its thermo-sen-
sitive qualities.
Applications explored from these materials primarily lie in the area of out-
door design [7,9], fashion [8] and domestic accessories, including green-
wall systems [9], work fences and furniture. Some of these outcomes are
currently displayed in the
Invention/Design: Regards Croisés
exhibition at
the Musée des Arts et Métiers, Paris until the 6th of March 2016.
ENSADLAB, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs, 31 rue d’Ulm, 75240 Paris Cedex 5, France
Purpose - Design industry remains today largely based on fossil fuel
transformation. Yet, reasonable projections consider oil peak production at
the horizon of 2025 (Raisson 2010, p.137). Despite continuously increasing
consumption, western societies will have in a soon future no other choice
than designing without such ressources.
This poster highlights the potential of the Polyoss Factory to oer alter-
native strategies for the design of plastic-based materials and products
based on the results of a ve weeks interdisciplinary workshop developed
at École Nationale des Arts Décoratifs, Paris. Underpinned by an up-cycling
approach, the process relies on a bespoke machine [1] allowing the design
of plastic bres and akes with variable size from industrial plastic waste
(Rognoli et. al, 2015).
Methods - The workshop is based on a practice-based and design-led
methodology placing material probes at the centre of the research (Berget
et. al, 2008, Mossé, 2014). Merging students with object and textile design
backgrounds, the workshop outcomes are informed by the appropriation
of polypropylene waste in the light of their respective practice.
[1] The Polyoss Factory prototype number 3 [2] Polyoss akes [3] nest Polyoss bres obtained [4] non-woven made out of polyoss bers [5] non-woven based on polyoss bres and akes (6)
three-dimensionnal woven composite based on Polyoss bres and linen.
(7) window box (8) and purse prototypes exhibited at Musée des Arts et Métiers (9) sample of plants
growing on a Polyoss substrate based on knitted and non-woven bres.
Limitations relates primarily today to the scale of the production and its
reproducibility. The process remains closer to a crafting rather than an in-
dustrial one, with the advantages and constraints of its variability. Further
research is needed to show the full extent of this up-cycled process.
Contact aurelie.mosse@ensad.fr ; emile.de-visscher@ensad.fr;
jean-francois.bassereau@ensad.fr
References
BERGERET, L., BASSEREAU J.-F., AOUSSAT A., 2008, Designing identity of a new material: a new prod-
uct design approach. In: Undisciplined! Design Research Society Conference 2008, Sheeld Hallam
University, Sheeld, UK, 16-19 July 2008. / 15 p.
MOSSÉ, A., 2014.
Gossamer TImescapes: Designing Self-Actuated Textiles for the Home
, Copenha-
gen: Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture , PhD thesis, pp.51-97.
RAISSON, V., 2010.
2033, Atlas des futurs du monde
, Paris: Robert Laont.
ROGNOLI, V., BIANCHINI, M. et.al. , 2015, DIY Materials, In: Materials and Design Journal 86, Elsevier,
pp.692-702.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Designing identity of a new material: a new product design approach
  • L Bergeret
  • Bassereau J.-F
  • Aoussat A
BERGERET, L., BASSEREAU J.-F., AOUSSAT A., 2008, Designing identity of a new material: a new product design approach. In: Undisciplined! Design Research Society Conference 2008, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, UK, 16-19 July 2008. / 15 p.
Gossamer TImescapes: Designing Self-Actuated Textiles for the Home, Copenhagen: Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture
  • A Raisson
MOSSÉ, A., 2014. Gossamer TImescapes: Designing Self-Actuated Textiles for the Home, Copenhagen: Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, PhD thesis, pp.51-97. RAISSON, V., 2010. 2033, Atlas des futurs du monde, Paris: Robert Laffont.
  • V Rognoli
  • M Bianchini
ROGNOLI, V., BIANCHINI, M. et.al., 2015, DIY Materials, In: Materials and Design Journal 86, Elsevier, pp.692-702.
Gossamer TImescapes: Designing Self-Actuated Textiles for the Home, Copenhagen: Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture
  • A Mossé
MOSSÉ, A., 2014. Gossamer TImescapes: Designing Self-Actuated Textiles for the Home, Copenhagen: Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, PhD thesis, pp.51-97.