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Naturbewusstsein und Identität: Die Rolle von Selbstkonzepten und sozialen Identitäten und ihre Entwicklungspotenziale für Natur- und Umweltschutz

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Why do people not have a natural benevolent and caring attitude towards their environment and nature, and why there is a gap between their intention and actual behaviour? In the search for answers to this question, the topic of the human "identification" with or "separation" from nature will be at the centre of this conference. Scientific talks will introduce the status quo of nature awareness and the socially defined self-understanding in Germany. Thereafter, developmental pathways to identities will be highlighted, which consider nature, the environment and fellow human beings more intensively and thus may contribute to overcoming the gap between intention-behaviour at individual and collective level. In order to provide new impulse for such inner transformation as a means to overcome the often observed intention behaviour gap, two workshops on Buddhist psychology and practice as well as on wilderness pedagogy address the human-nature relationship. In particular, they will introduce individual and active approaches to identity and interdependence with nature and the environment.
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