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Within-Household Selection and Dual-Frame Telephone Surveys: A Comparative Experiment of Eleven Different Selection Methods

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... There are plenty of studies that examine within-household selection procedures as well as their strengths and weaknesses, especially for the US survey settings. In other words, there exists literature on within-household selection procedures and their impact on statistics in the US surveys (Alves et al., 2014;Lavrakas, 1993;Lavrakas, 2008;Lavrakas and Bauman, 1993;Lavrakas et al., 2000;Marlar et al., 2018;Marken, 2018;Smyth et al., 2019). In later and earlier, a large portion of the examinations focuses on the Kish technique which follows the probabilistic selection procedure (Kish, 1949). ...
... There are plenty of studies that examine within-household selection procedures as well as their strengths and weaknesses, especially for the US survey settings. In other words, there exists literature on within-household selection procedures and their impact on statistics in the US surveys (Alves et al., 2014;Lavrakas, 1993;Lavrakas, 2008;Lavrakas and Bauman, 1993;Lavrakas et al., 2000;Marlar et al., 2018;Marken, 2018;Smyth et al., 2019). In later and earlier, a large portion of the examinations focuses on the Kish technique which follows the probabilistic selection procedure (Kish, 1949). ...
... Yan et al. (2015) and Kumar (2014) have featured the utilization of probabilistic methodology when selecting respondents in order to give precise statistics through a representative sample. When modes of data collection are considered, respondent choice strategies and their efficiency were generally examined for phone surveys (Binson and Catania, 2000;Marlar et al., 2018;Lavrakas et al., 2000). The Kish strategy, last and next birthday techniques, full enumeration method, oldest and youngest methods, the Troldahl-Carter-Byrant (TCB) method, and arbitrary convenience method are among the well-known selection procedures even though there are additionally alternative methods to select the specific respondent (Gaziano, 2005). ...
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Keeter, S., N. Hatley, C. Kennedy, and L. Arnold. 2017. "What Low Response Rates Mean for Telephone Surveys." Pew Research Center. http://www.pewresearch.org/2017/05/15/ what-low-response-rates-mean-for-telephone-surveys/.
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