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Abstract

A field experiment was conducted on sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) at the Agricultural University of Athens during the growing summer season 2017 to evaluate the effects of biocyclic humus soil on plant growth, yield as well as chemical constituents and quality parameters. The experiment was laid out in completely randomized design (CRD) with three replications of three treatments (untreated, inorganic fertilizer and biocyclic humus soil). A two-leaf cutting was placed into the treated soil to make a sweet potato plant. The highest sweet potato yield was obtained by using biocyclic humus soil with average total yield (35.6 t/ha) and average marketable yield (24.3 t/ha). There were no statistically significant differences between the treatments for the compression (Max Load 0.622-0.780 kN) and the penetration (Max Load 0.0439-0.0447 kN) tests on sweet potato tubers. Furthermore, measurements were implemented for the total nitrogen content of tubers with no statistical significant differences between treatments. The big difference in yield between sweet potato grown in humus soil and sweet potato treated conventionally probably is related to the fact that the structure of soil which is a clay loam soil was too compact for the cultivation of sweet potato, a disadvantage which has been compensated by using humus soil as substrate while substituting soil.
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EFFECT OF BIOCYCLIC HUMUS SOIL ON IELD AND UALIT
ARAMETERS OF SWEET OTATO (Ipomoea batatas L.
Lia Drtea EISENBACH
1
, Antilena FOLINA
1
, Carileia ISI
1
, Iannis ROUSSIS
1
,
Ianna TABAI
1
, anaita AASTLIANOU
1
, I. KAKABOUKI
1
,
Aspasia EFTHIMIADOU
2
, Dimitris . BILALIS
1
1
Agricltral niersity o Atens, Scool o Agricltre, ngineering an nironmental
Sciences, Department o Crop Science, Laoratory o Agronomy, 75 Iera Oos Street,
118 55 Atens, reece
2
Institte o Soil Science, ellenic Agricltral Organiation-Demeter, 1 S. Venielo Street,
1123 Lycorissi, reece
Corresponing ator email ilalisimitriosgmail.gr
Abstract
A field experiment was conducted on sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) at the Agricultural University of Athens during
the growing summer season 2017 to evaluate the effects of biocyclic humus soil on plant growth, yield as well as
chemical constituents and quality parameters. The experiment was laid out in completely randomized design (CRD)
with three replications of three treatments (untreated, inorganic fertilizer and biocyclic humus soil). A two-leaf cutting
was placed into the treated soil to make a sweet potato plant. The highest sweet potato yield was obtained by using
biocyclic humus soil with average total yield (35.6 t/ha) and average marketable yield (24.3 t/ha). There were no
statistically significant differences between the treatments for the compression (Max Load 0.622-0.780 kN) and the
penetration (Max Load 0.0439-0.0447 kN) tests on sweet potato tubers. Furthermore, measurements were implemented
for the total nitrogen content of tubers with no statistical significant differences between treatments. The big difference
in yield between sweet potato grown in humus soil and sweet potato treated conventionally probably is related to the
fact that the structure of soil which is a clay loam soil was too compact for the cultivation of sweet potato, a
disadvantage which has been compensated by using humus soil as substrate while substituting soil.
Key words: biocyclic humus soil, Biocyclic Vegan Standard, sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas L., productivity and
quality.
INTRODUCTION
e total gloal seet potato proction in
201 as more tan 105 million tonnes AO-
SA, 2018 it Cina aing te iggest
sare in proction aot . Cina an te
.S. are te astest groing eporters. og
seet potato is a traitional crop or many
contries o te orl Cina, Meico etc.
cltiation an consmption in ropean
contries ecame more poplar in te last
ecaes. Loeenstein, 2009. e ropean
proction is oere y or contries
Portgal, Spain, Italy an reece it a total
proction o 52 tosan o tonnes in 201. In
te same year ree seet potato proction
as 3,3 tosan tonnes cltiate in an area o
1 a AO-SA, 2018.
Seet potato origins are on in Central or
Nortestern Sot America e to te
occrrence o ropical orest root crop
agriculture (O’Brien, 1972). It as son tat
ater an analysis o seet potato genotypes it
RAPD marers te ispersal o seet potato
as een aciee more trog te
CentralCariean genopool ici et al.,
2003.
e scientiic name o seet potato is Ipomoea
batatas L. Lam an elongs to te
Conollaceae amily. Ipomoea batatas can
e aste in many climate ones sc as
arm mi tropics or mil s-temperate
ones also at an altite o 2000 meters. e
plant o seet potato preers a sany loam
gron an is cltiate oten on mons or
riges Lim, 201.
e eile parts o te seet potato plant are
te roots or ters t also te seet potato
leaes an green tips. Seet potato lor or
starc is also se as an ingreient or
Scientic Papers. Series A. Agronomy, Vol. LXI, No. 1, 2018
ISSN 2285-5785; ISSN CD-ROM 2285-5793; ISSN Online 2285-5807; ISSN-L 2285-5785
... Nevertheless, in our study, the yield was higher under organic blends fertilizers. Similar results occurred for Eisenbach et al. (2018) [66]. This can be explained by the fact that in this application the growth of roots is improved, which is responsible for the intake of nutrients and water. ...
... Nevertheless, in our study, the yield was higher under organic blends fertilizers. Similar results occurred for Eisenbach et al. (2018) [66]. This can be explained by the fact that in this application the growth of roots is improved, which is responsible for the intake of nutrients and water. ...
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While processing tomato cultivation (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is considered one of the most important industrial crops in Greece, a waste known as tomato pomace is growing significantly high. Notably, the tomato pomace presents enormous opportunities for the creations of organic fertilizers. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of tomato pomace as a fertilizer in the same crop. A field experiment was established at the Agricultural University of Athens during 2018 and 2019 in a randomized complete design with five treatments (control, inorganic NPK (NPK), Tomato pomace and Biocycle Humus Soil (Tp and BHS), Tomato pomace and Farmyard manure (Tp and FYM), and Tomato pomace and Compost (Tp and CM). Physical soil properties such as soil porosity and penetration resistance were improved by the application of organic blends. Additionally, soil nitrogen content ranged from 0.10% (control and NPK) to 0.13% (Tp and FYM). A significant increase of yield was noticed under organic fertilization where the highest yield of 8.00 tn ha−1 was recorded in Tp and BHS (2018). Lycopene content was significantly affected by fertilization and its highest values were 87.25 (Tp and BHS; 2018), and 88.82 mg kg−1 fresh (Tp and FYM; 2019). Regarding fruit firmness, the three organic blends did not have statistically significant difference. In addition, the Total Soluble Solids (TSS) was significantly affected by the fertilization and the maximum value was 4.80 ◦Brix (Tp and CM; 2018). In brief, tomato pomace blended with organic fertilizers was yielded considerable since it improved soil quality and increased yield.
... Academic and practitioner literature has favorably associated veganic approaches with various agronomic factors, including: yield, quality, nutrient cycling, soil nitrogen level, soil carbon storage, soil biology, soil organic matter, and energy inputs (Pimentel et al. 2005;Cormack 2006;Hepperly et al. 2006;Eisenbach et al. 2018;Matsuura et al. 2018;Eisenbach et al. 2019;Roussis et al. 2019;Rosato et al. 2020;Utter and Seymour forthcoming) 3 ; sustainable agriculture or food systems (Hall and Tolhurst 2007;Visak 2007;Burnett 2014;Bonsall 2015;Hagemann and Potthast 2015;Hirth 2020;Kassam and Kassam 2021;Nobari 2021); food safety (O'Brien 1964;Seymour 2018a;Alsanius et al. 2019;Utter and Seymour forthcoming); diminished environmental impacts (Markussen et al. 2014;Seymour 2018a); marketing potential (Jürkenbeck et al. 2019;Jürkenbeck and Spiller 2020); and "animal-friendly" (Visak 2007) and "post-lethal" (Mann 2020) agriculture. Despite the diversity of veganic 2 "Stockfree" was selected as a "more neutral technical term," not necessarily associated with veganism (Schmutz and Foresi 2017, p. 477). ...
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