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Engaging with Heritage to Promote Innovative Thinking in Engineering Management Education

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This chapter argues that by “thinking out of the box” and by setting learning outside of the “traditional” classroom and boundaries, engineering educators can both promote innovative thinking and enhance the student experience. It discusses a graduate level management module taught as part of a number of master's programs in engineering and engineering management. The chapter provides a unique insight into engineering education in the UK and discusses how the relationships, variety and synergy (RVS) approach to engineering education may be used to promote innovative thinking in students. In applying the RVS approach to graduate level engineering management education, the project management module uses heritage engineering to contextualize contemporary engineering practice and procedure while encouraging students to consider how innovative thinking in engineering impacts the world in which we live. The concept of the engineering professional suggests that innovative thinking skills are now more important than ever.
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... Innovative thinking is seen as a competency that can be taught and strengthened Cropley, 2015). Hence, in recent years, educational programs are designed to promote students' innovation capabilities by providing them with a set of expertise to meet the demands of the new economy (Andrews & Clark, 2018;Barak et al., 2020;Dyer et al., 2019). Yet, higher education is still struggling with the challenge of developing and implementing effective pedagogical methods for cultivating students' innovation capabilities (Andrews & Clark, 2018;Barak & Usher, 2019), particularly when facing a growth in international student enrollment. ...
... Hence, in recent years, educational programs are designed to promote students' innovation capabilities by providing them with a set of expertise to meet the demands of the new economy (Andrews & Clark, 2018;Barak et al., 2020;Dyer et al., 2019). Yet, higher education is still struggling with the challenge of developing and implementing effective pedagogical methods for cultivating students' innovation capabilities (Andrews & Clark, 2018;Barak & Usher, 2019), particularly when facing a growth in international student enrollment. ...
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