Article

Intervenciones Humanitarias para la Recuperación del Trauma con Terapia EMDR en Latinoamérica y el Caribe

Authors:
  • Asociación Mexicana para Ayuda Mental en Crisis A.C.
  • Latin American and Caribbean Foundation for Psychological Trauma Research, Mexico
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Abstract

Este artículo presenta un resumen de las Intervenciones Humanitarias para la Recuperación del Trauma con Terapia de Reprocesamiento y Desensibilización a través del Movimiento Ocular (EMDR) en Latinoamérica y el Caribe y proporciona al lector ejemplos de historias clínicas obtenidas en la primera línea de apoyo. A lo largo de los muchos años realizando trabajo de campo, hemos observado que el trauma psicológico, como consecuencia de las situaciones multifacéticas que enfrentan los individuos y comunidades después de un desastre, implica un gran reto. En el presente artículo, describimos las Intervenciones Humanitarias con Terapia EMDR realizadas desde 1998 en Latinoamérica y el Caribe, para tratar las perturbaciones psicológicas que se presentan en las y los sobrevivientes después de desastres naturales (ej. inundaciones, deslizamientos de tierra, terremotos), desastres provocados por el hombre, masacres humanas y violencia interpersonal severa. Se ha proporcionado tratamiento a niños, adolescentes y adultos sobrevivientes, frecuentemente en las comunidades donde ocurrieron los desastres; así como a auxiliadores y a pacientes con cáncer. Los protocolos de Intervención Temprana con Terapia EMDR son intervenciones breves y efectivas que pueden ser utilizadas en campo o en situaciones de emergencia. Existe un cuerpo de investigaciones que apoyan el uso de protocolos modificados de Terapia EMDR para tratar el trauma agudo en formatos de atención individual y grupal (Jarero, Artigas, & Luber, 2011).

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