Article

Simulation of Kinetic Curves of Polymerase Chain Reaction Obtained Using Fluorescent Oligonucleotide Probes

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Abstract

At present, many polymerase chain reaction models have been proposed for exact quantitative estimation of the reaction results. In most models, kinetics of product accumulation and kinetics of fluorescent reporter are assumed to be identical. A model of the polymerase chain reaction is proposed to study the difference of such functions in the system in which a hybridization probe serves as the source of the detected fluorescence signal. Adequacy of the model is verified, and significant possible difference of the accumulation kinetics of product and probe reporter is demonstrated.

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