Book

Nachrichtenrezeption auf Facebook. Vom beiläufigen Kontakt zur Auseinandersetzung

Authors:

Abstract

Anna Sophie Kümpel geht der Frage nach, welche Faktoren die Auseinandersetzung mit Nachrichteninhalten beeinflussen, die während der Facebook-Nutzung beiläufig entdeckt werden (Incidental News Exposure). Hierfür systematisiert die Autorin relevante Rahmenbedingungen sowie Einflussfaktoren und prüft deren Bedeutung mithilfe eines qualitativ-quantitativen Mixed-Methods-Ansatzes. Die Befunde zeigen, dass vor allem bestehende Themeninteressen die Zuwendung zu Nachrichten erklären können. Daneben spielen im Kontext von Facebook jedoch auch soziale Einflüsse sowie die Art des Nachrichtenerfahrens eine Rolle. Der Inhalt • Nachrichtennutzung auf sozialen Netzwerkseiten • Nachrichten auf Facebook: Vom beiläufigen Kontakt zur Auseinandersetzung • Wege zum Klick: Welche Merkmale beeinflussen die Auseinandersetzung mit Nachrichten auf Facebook? Die Zielgruppen • Dozierende und Studierende der Sozialwissenschaften sowie insbesondere der Medien- und Kommunikationswissenschaft • Journalisten und Social-Media-Manager Die Autorin Anna Sophie Kümpel ist wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin am Institut für Kommunikationswissenschaft und Medienforschung der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München.
... Moreover, several authors deduced from in-depth interviews that strong ties, particularly those who are well-read and regarded as opinion leaders in a certain field, act as secondary gatekeepers for engagement with news articles (Bergström & Jervelycke Belfrage, 2018;Boczkowski et al., 2018;Kümpel, 2018). Contrary to the findings of Sülflow et al. (2019) and the Reuters Institute Digital News Report (Hölig & Hasebrink, 2018;Newman et al., 2019), the news brand was of no concern for interviewees in studies by Kümpel (2018) and Bergström and Jervelycke Belfrage (2018). ...
... Moreover, several authors deduced from in-depth interviews that strong ties, particularly those who are well-read and regarded as opinion leaders in a certain field, act as secondary gatekeepers for engagement with news articles (Bergström & Jervelycke Belfrage, 2018;Boczkowski et al., 2018;Kümpel, 2018). Contrary to the findings of Sülflow et al. (2019) and the Reuters Institute Digital News Report (Hölig & Hasebrink, 2018;Newman et al., 2019), the news brand was of no concern for interviewees in studies by Kümpel (2018) and Bergström and Jervelycke Belfrage (2018). Instead, they appreciated that by sharing and even more by commenting on articles, their Facebook friends 76 2. 3. News Consumption on Facebook re-contextualize the news content (Bergström & Jervelycke Belfrage, 2018;Boczkowski et al., 2018). ...
... This implies that both expertise and similarity of social status may render a news endorser an epistemic authority, which is in line with the latest insights from who showed that when a communication partner possesses high expertise with regard to the target referent, individuals strive to achieve a shared reality with him, even when he is no member of their in-group and thus neither similar nor socially close to them. News shared by strong ties on Facebook are more likely to be selected even when they are in contradiction to one's attitudes (Anspach, 2017;Bergström & Jervelycke Belfrage, 2018;Boczkowski et al., 2018;Jungnickel & Maireder, 2015;Kümpel, 2018). To my knowledge, previous research has not yet investigated whether the opinion of a strong tie news endorser also affects opinion formation about news topics more strongly than the opinion of a weak tie news endorser. ...
Thesis
Social networking sites have become an online realm where users are exposed to news about current affairs. People mainly encounter news incidentally because they are re-distributed by users whom they befriended or follow on social media platforms. In my dissertation project, I draw on shared reality theory in order to examine the question of how the relationship to the news endorser, the person who shares news content, determines social influence on opinion formation about shared news. The shared reality theory posits that people strive to achieve socially shared beliefs about any object and topic because of the fundamental epistemic need to establish what is real. Social verification of beliefs in interpersonal communication renders uncertain and ambiguous individual perceptions as valid and objectively true. However, reliable social verification may be provided only by others who are regarded as epistemic authority, in other words as someone whose judgment one can trust. People assign epistemic authority particularly to socially close others, such as friends and family, or to members of their in-group. I inferred from this that people should be influenced by the view of a socially close news endorser when forming an opinion about shared news content but not by the view of a socially distant news endorser. In Study 1, a laboratory experiment (N = 226), I manipulated a female news endorser’s social closeness by presenting her as an in-group or out-group member. Participants’ opinion and memory of a news article were not affected by the news endorser’s opinion in either of the conditions. I concluded that the news article did not elicit motivation to strive for shared reality because participants were confident about their own judgment. Therefore, they did not rely on the news endorser’s view when forming an opinion about the news topic. Moreover, the results revealed that participants had stronger trust in the news endorser when she expressed a positive (vs. negative) opinion about the news topic, while social closeness to the news endorser did not predict trust. On the one hand, this is in line with the social norm of sharing positive thoughts and experiences on social networking sites: adherence to the positivity norm results in more favorable social ratings. On the other hand, my findings indicate that participants generally had a positive opinion about the topic of the stimulus article and thus had more trust in news endorsers who expressed a similar opinion. In Study 2, an online experiment (N = 1, 116), I exposed participants to a news post by a relational close vs. relational distant news endorser by having them name a close or distant actual Facebook friend. There was a small influence of the news endorser’s opinion on participants’ thought and opinion valence irrespective of whether the news endorser was a close or distant friend. The finding was surprising, particularly because participants reported stronger trust in the view of the close friend than in the view of a distant friend. I concluded that in light of an ambiguity eliciting news article, people may even rely on the views of less trustworthy news endorsers in order to establish a socially shared and, therefore, valid opinion about a news topic. Drawing on shared reality theory, I hypothesized that social influence on opinion formation is mediated by news endorser congruent responses to a news post. The results indicated a tendency for the proposed indirect relation however, the effect size was small and the sample in Study 2 was not large enough to provide the necessary statistical power to detect the mediation. In conclusion, the results of my empirical studies provide first insights regarding the conditions under which a single news endorser influences opinion formation about news shared on social networking sites. I found limited support for shared reality creation as underlying mechanism of such social influence. Thus, my work contributes to the understanding of social influence on news perception happening in social networking sites and proposes theoretical refinements to shared reality theory. I suggest that future research should focus on the role of social and affiliative motivation for social influences on opinion formation about news shared on social networking sites.
... Karnowski et al., 2017;Oeldorf-Hirsch, 2017), or might be restricted to 'invisible' mind focusing. Although news content at the teaser level is limited in terms of substance and complexity (Kümpel, 2019), these 'snack news' can in principal be processed with various levels of effort. However, 'news snacking' is not an attentive form of news reception: Though the news post grasped the user's attention at first glance, it has not exceeded the personal relevance threshold which would have led to actually clicking on the linked article and thus to attentive, systematic processing in path C. Instead, we assume that processing based on heuristics is more likely. ...
... That is, even when examining a news post superficially, it may still contribute toward recognizing particular aspects. However, this recognition potential is restricted to the teaser level in path B. Hence, reasonable learning outcomes based on path B are the recognition of political actors or other forms of rather simple factual knowledge, but not the recall of complex factual knowledge (Kümpel, 2019): ...
... Hence, calling up news-related posts occurs predominantly when there is a thematic interest (Karnowski et al., 2017). However, such an 'interest' in a given news item might also be generated in situ (Kümpel, 2019) through perceived informational utility or emotional and thus more impulsive reactions. Another important determining factor for news engagement is the news recommender: social curation might increase the social relevance that is attributed to a given news post (Kaiser et al., 2018). ...
Article
Full-text available
Research on incidental news exposure in the context of social media focuses on ‘successful’ incidental news exposure – when unintended news contacts result in active engagement and knowledge gains. However, we lack both theoretical and empirical approaches to the far more likely case that people keep on scrolling through their newsfeed without any post triggering active engagement. To fill this gap, the article conceptualizes a triple-path model of incidental news exposure on social media as a process. Building upon the Cognitive Mediation Model, dual system theories on information processing and recent empirical findings, three different pathways of incidental news processing are identified: automatic, incidental and active. The triple-path model thus allows to theorize the learning potentials that can plausibly be expected from each incidental news exposure path as a starting point for future research.
... Außerdem waren die Nachrichtenposts weder von Quellen, die Nutzer*innen sich selbst ausgesucht haben, zu Themen, für die sie sich interessieren, oder von Personen, mit denen sie befreundet sind. Alle diese Merkmale sind jedoch entscheidend dafür, wie sich Nutzer*innen in ihrem News Feed im Umgang mit Nachrichtenposts verhalten (Karnowski et al., 2017;Kümpel, 2019a) und könnten sich demnach auch auf die beschriebene Effekte der Studie auswirken. ...
... Für Post-Exposure-Walktrough finden sich auch andere Begriffe. Kümpel (2019a) fasst diese summarisch und in Anlehnung an andere Autoren mit (gestütztes) nachträgliches lautes Denken (z. B. Bilandzic, 2004), selbstkonfrontatives Interview (z. ...
Book
Durch das Internet hat sich der Zugang zu Nachrichten maßgeblich verändert. Informationen stehen nicht nur unbegrenzt zur Verfügung, sondern sie sind auch zu einem omnipräsenten Bestandteil in digitalen Informationsumgebungen geworden. Dadurch werden Internetnutzer*innen, auch ohne bewusst danach zu suchen, wiederholt mit tagesaktuellen Schlagzeilen konfrontiert, z.B. wenn sie ihren Browser öffnen, oder sich auf sozialen Netzwerkseiten bewegen. Diese kurzen Nachrichtenkontakte haben aufgrund der geringen Informationsmenge wenig Potential für Lerneffekte, können jedoch das Gefühl vermitteln, sich mit einem Thema auszukennen. Vor diesem Hintergrund stellt sich die Frage, inwiefern Nachrichten in digitalen Informationsumgebungen die Entstehung einer Wissensillusion begünstigen, wie sich dieser Prozess erklären lässt und mit welchen Folgen dies verbunden ist. Im theoretischen Teil der Arbeit werden dazu Erkenntnisse zum Gedächtnis, dem Metagedächtnis und der Rolle von Medien für Wissen und Wissenswahrnehmung aufgearbeitet. In Studie 1 wird mit einer experimentellen Studie untersucht, wie sich Nachrichten auf sozialen Netzwerkseiten im Vergleich zu vollständigen Nachrichtenartikeln auf objektives und subjektives Wissen auswirken. Außerdem werden Effekte einer Wissensillusion für Einstellungen und Verhalten untersucht. Studie 2 untersucht mit qualitativen Leitfadeninterviews, welche Rolle Medien für Wissen und Lernen aus Sicht der Nutzer*innen spielen. Diese Erkenntnisse liefern Erklärungen dafür, weshalb und aufgrund welcher Merkmale unterschiedliche Nachrichtenkontakte eine Wissensillusion begünstigen können.
... Für die Mehrzahl der Teilnehmer*innen ist die Auseinandersetzung mit Nachrichten lediglich eine Nebenbei-Beschäftigung, die fragmentarisch, unterwegs auf dem Smartphone und primär zur Bekämpfung von Langeweile stattfindet (siehe dazu auch Antunovic et al., 2018;Van Damme et al., 2020). Zudem lässt sich eine große Abhängigkeit von mehr oder weniger "zufällig" eintreffenden Empfehlungen von Nachrichtenaggregatoren, News Apps oder sozialen Medien verzeichnen, die aber nur dann zu einer eingehenderen Rezeption führen, wenn bereits ein grundlegendes Interesse an dem behandelten Thema besteht (siehe dazu auch Kümpel, 2019b;Möller et al., 2019;Thorson et al., 2019). Bedingt durch diese an einzelnen Beiträgen, Überschriften und Push-Nachrichten orientierten Routi- ...
Article
Prozesse der Nachrichten- und Informationsnutzung haben sich in den letzten Jahren gewandelt - insbesondere bei jungen Erwachsenen. So suggerieren die Dominanz des Smartphones sowie die Popularität sozialer Medien in dieser Altersgruppe, dass die Nutzung von Nachrichten zunehmend durch den situativen und sozialen Kontext geprägt sowie abhängig(er) von „zufälligen“ Kontakten mit einzelnen Beiträgen wird. Derzeit fehlt es jedoch an Erkenntnissen dazu, ob und inwiefern sich Zusammenhänge zwischen den Charakteristika der Nachrichtenerfahrung in gegenwärtigen Informationsumgebungen und dem Stellenwert von Nachrichten im Alltag von Nutzer*innen zeigen. Insbesondere ist unklar, ob und inwiefern (neue) Nutzungspraktiken auch das grundlegende Verständnis von Nachrichten herausfordern. Die Studie untersucht daher, wie junge Erwachsene heute „Nachrichten“ definieren und welche Nutzungspraktiken und -gewohnheiten ihren Umgang mit tagesaktuellen Informationen kennzeichnen. Methodisch wird auf eine Kombination aus einer via WhatsApp realisierten Tagebuchstudie sowie qualitativen Interviews mit insgesamt 47 Studierenden im Alter von 18 bis 24 Jahren gesetzt. Die Ergebnisse verweisen auf den geringen Stellenwert, den Nachrichten im Alltag selbst hochgebildeter junger Menschen einnehmen. Sie zeigen zudem die Schwierigkeit, „Nachrichten(-nutzung)“ zu definieren, sowie die Divergenzen zwischen normativ geprägten Ansprüchen an „gute“ Nachrichten und eigenen Nutzungserfahrungen.
... Während insbesondere soziale Netzwerkseiten (SNS) wie Facebook und Twitter anfänglich vor allem der interpersonalen Vernetzung und Selbstdarstellung dienten, sind die Plattformen indes auch zu einer zentralen Schnittstelle für die Medien-, Informations-und Nachrichtennutzung geworden (Hölig & Hasebrink, 2018;Kümpel, 2019). Angesichts der vielfältigen Potentiale für Partizipation, Interaktion und Anschlusskommunikation haben sie zudem dazu beigetragen, dass a) die Teilhabe an öffentlichen Diskursen drastisch vereinfacht wurde, b) Nutzer*innen flexibel zwischen Kommunikator-und Rezipientenrolle wechseln können und c) journalistische Inhalte sowie politische Debatten auch von "normalen" Bürgeren öffentlichkeitswirksam kommentiert und problematisiert werden können (Neuberger, 2017). ...
Article
Der vorliegende Beitrag widmet sich den negativen Aspekten eines Wandels der Sprach- und Debattenkultur in sozialen Online-Medien. Im Rahmen eines narrativen Literaturüberblicks diskutieren wir sowohl mögliche Ursachen (der Wahrnehmung) einer inzivilen Sprach- und Debattenkultur als auch Wirkungen auf die Nutzer*innen sozialer Online-Medien. Der Fokus auf Inzivilität soll dabei jedoch nicht suggerieren, dass die Kommunikation im Internet ausschließlich negative Effekte produziert (oder gar provoziert). Er ergibt sich vielmehr aus der Annahme, dass die gesellschaftlichen Auswirkungen in diesem Bereich grundsätzlich als gravierender erscheinen sowie dem Ziel, eine Diskussion über mögliche Gegenmaßnahmen anzuregen. Auch solche Möglichkeiten zur Verhinderung bzw. Verminderung von Inzivilität nehmen wir in diesem Beitrag explizit in den Blick und bieten so Ansatzpunkte für die Entwicklung von Strategien zur Verbesserung der diskursiven Qualität. Mehr Informationen: https://www.kas.de/single-title/-/content/wandel-der-sprach-und-debattenkultur-in-sozialen-online-medien
Chapter
Soziale Medien sind zu einer wichtigen Ressource geworden, um auf Nachrichteninhalte aufmerksam zu werden. Welche Folgen damit verbunden sind, wird sehr unterschiedlich eingeschätzt und reicht von einer Abschottung in Echokammern, die eine Gefahr für die Demokratie darstellen, bis hin zu der Möglichkeit, deutlich vielfältigere Inhalte inklusive zahlreicher Partizipationsoptionen wahrnehmen zu können, was wiederrum als förderlich für eine funktionierende demokratische Gesellschaft erachtet wird. Dieser Beitrag zeigt, dass eine pauschale Sichtweise auf Nachrichtennutzer und -nutzerinnen in Sozialen Medien fehl am Platze ist. Wenn Chancen und Risiken abgeschätzt werden sollen, ist insbesondere auch für Nachrichtenanbieter zu unterscheiden, ob Soziale Medien eine ergänzende, die wichtigste oder gar die einzige Nachrichtenquelle darstellen.
Chapter
Seit einigen Jahren sind zwei einprägsame Metaphern im öffentlichen und wissenschaftlichen Diskurs allgegenwärtig – Filterblasen und Echokammern. Beide beschreiben plakativ die Gefahr, dass Menschen sich in eine Welt zurückziehen oder in sie befördert werden, in der sie nur noch Themen, die sie interessieren, und Meinungen, die sie selbst vertreten, zur Kenntnis nehmen (müssen). Bei der Entstehung solcher Enklaven wird algorithmisch gesteuerten Informationsquellen (insbesondere sozialen Medien und Suchmaschinen) eine Schlüsselrolle zugewiesen. Der Beitrag gibt einen Überblick über theoretische Annahmen und empirischen Forschungsstand zu Filterblasen und Echokammern. Er macht deutlich, dass die pauschalisierenden Annahmen beider Metaphern der tatsächlichen Komplexität politischer Meinungsbildungsprozesse nicht gerecht werden und dass die impliziten Personalisierungsmechanismen von Algorithmen bisher überschätzt wurden.
Chapter
Digital platforms are becoming increasingly relevant for the constitution of markets. As they can be used in a multifunctional way, platforms are also having a massive impact on the provision and dissemination of both public and private information. Moreover, they are playing a significant role in social exchange. Platforms that facilitate the provision and dissemination of media content and journalistic work are having both economic and cultural effects on the traditional media and communications industry, which is becoming irrelevant and losing income from advertising and users. Social media platforms, such as Facebook, especially are becoming important means for certain social groups to acquire up-to-date information. Platforms and their growth and development are influencing both the traditional media and journalism, which is becoming clear from the growing financial crisis these two sectors are experiencing. The unfolding transformation process is having diverse effects on both the public sphere and on information and communication processes, which in turn is affecting liberal democracy. These changes require specific attention in both interdisciplinary research and politics (the design of a media and communications landscape, regulation, etc.). With contributions by Klaus Beck, Patrick Donges, Otfried Jarren, Katharina von Kleinen-Königslow, Frank Löbigs, Christoph Neuberger, Manuel Puppis
Chapter
Digitale Kommunikation inklusive der Nutzung von Social Media haben die Art und Weise der Bereitstellung und Rezeption von Informationen nachhaltig verändert. Auch staatliche Akteur*innen wie die Polizei sind heute selbstverständlich und mit einem breiten Anwendungsspektrum in Social Media aktiv. Neben Potenzialen birgt dies allerdings auch problematische Aspekte, unter anderem im Hinblick auf das einzuhaltende Neutralitätsgebot. Inwieweit Polizei durch eigene Veröffentlichungen mediale und politische Debatten prägt, wird in diesem Beitrag anhand der polizeilichen Darstellung (und deren Rezeption) der Ereignisse in Leipzig-Connewitz in der Silvesternacht 2019/2020 diskursanalytisch illustriert.
Chapter
Search engines have established themselves as the central means of searching for information online. This book examines which criteria are important for the selection of search results when Internet users search for information using search engines. For this purpose, the book systematises and combines both the search process and relevant factors which influence selection decisions in a model that describes the effect of various influences on the individual steps in the search process. In three preliminary studies and one main study, each following an experimental design and relying on the automated recording of search behaviour, it empirically tests selected steps in the model. The results of this show that ranking acts as the dominant influence in the selection of search results. However, source characteristics and individual attributions (e.g. the perceived credibility of search results) also have a distinct influence on the search process.
Article
Full-text available
Internet users are constantly confronted with metric information about the popularity of goods, services, and content. These popularity cues (PCs) - which we define as metric information about users' behavior or their evaluations of entities - serve as social signals for users who are confronted with them. Due to the high relevance that PCs have for organizations, consumers, and scholars, this article provides a systematic overview of PC research. First, we present a theoretical conceptualization for the effects of PCs. Second , we analyze empirical research that focuses on PCs by providing a review of academic, peer-reviewed studies on the direct effects of PCs in online media (N = 61). Third, we utilize the results of our literature review to address current shortcomings in the literature and to provide insights for future research.
Article
Full-text available
Social media users incidentally get exposed to news when their networks provide content that they would otherwise not seek out purposefully. We developed a scale of incidental news exposure on social media and conducted a survey to examine its antecedents. We found that information received through weak ties, rather than strong ties, was significantly associated with incidental news exposure. The amount of time spent, frequency of getting news updates, and the frequency clicking on news-related links on social media were correlated with incidental exposure. Our findings suggest that promoting news consumption on social media can be achieved not only through giving users information they want but also by exposing users to information they are not consciously looking for.
Article
Full-text available
A number of news organizations have begun shifting commenting from their websites to Facebook, based on the implicit assumption that commenting on Facebook is an equivalent (or preferred) substitute. Using survey data from 317 online news commenters, and drawing on the concept of imagined audience, this article examines this assumption by comparing news commenters’ perceptions of imagined audiences for comments on news organizations’ websites and on Facebook. While news commenters had mostly different imagined audiences between the two platforms, they had similar evaluations of the personal dimensions of their audiences and the quality of news comments. News commenters on Facebook, for example, did not perceive their audiences to be any more reasonable, intelligent, or responsive—or any less aggressive—than did commenters on news organizations’ websites. Facebook commenters also did not perceive comments to be of any greater quality than did commenters on news organizations’ websites. Thus, it appears that at least in the context of aiming to elevate the quality and civility of civic discourse, news commenters do not perceive Facebook to be demonstrably better than news organizations’ websites. Implications for journalism, social media, and future research are discussed.
Article
Full-text available
Conventional models of agenda setting hold that mainstream media influence the public agenda by leading audience attention, and perceived importance, to certain issues. However, increased selectivity and audience fragmentation in today’s digital media environment threaten the traditional agenda-setting power of the mass media. An important development to consider in light of this change is the growing use of social media for entertainment and information. This study investigates whether mainstream media can influence the public agenda when channeled through social media. By leveraging an original, longitudinal experiment, I test whether being exposed to political information through Facebook yields an agenda-setting effect by raising participants’ perceived importance of certain policy issues. Findings show that participants exposed to political information on Facebook exhibit increased levels of issue salience consistent with the issues shared compared with participants who were not shown political information; these effects are strongest among those with low political interest.
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT To help inform the debate over whether social media is related to political polarization, we investigated the effects of social media use on changes in political view using panel data collected in South Korea (N = 6411) between 2012 and 2016. We found that, although there were no direct effects of social media use, social media indirectly contributed to polarization through increased political engagement. Those who actively used social network sites were more likely to engage in political processes, which led them to develop more extreme political attitudes over time than those who did not use social network sites. In particular, we observed a clear trend toward a more liberal direction among both politically neutral users and moderately liberal users. In this study, we highlight the role of social media in activating political participation, which eventually pushes the users toward the ideological poles. The implications of these findings are discussed.
Article
Full-text available
A growing social science literature has used Twitter and Facebook to study political and social phenomena including for election forecasting and tracking political conversations. This research note uses a nationally representative probability sample of the British population to examine how Twitter and Facebook users differ from the general population in terms of demographics, political attitudes and political behaviour. We find that Twitter and Facebook users differ substantially from the general population on many politically relevant dimensions including vote choice, turnout, age, gender, and education. On average social media users are younger and better educated than non-users, and they are more liberal and pay more attention to politics. Despite paying more attention to politics, social media users are less likely to vote than non-users, but they are more likely to support the left leaning Labour Party when they do vote. However, we show that these apparent differences mostly arise due to the demographic composition of social media users. After controlling for age, gender, and education, no statistically significant differences arise between social media users and non-users on political attention, values or political behaviour.
Article
Full-text available
Social media have become an integral part of online news use, affecting how individuals find, consume, and share news. By applying the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA), this study investigates the effects of motives, attitude, and intention on news-sharing behavior among German social media users (n = 333). Findings show that news-sharing attitude and subjective norms have a positive effect on news-sharing intention, which in turn has a positive effect on actual news-sharing behavior. Taken together, we see that a new media behavior in the early phases of its societal diffusion—like social media news sharing in Germany in 2015—can mainly be explained by a rational choice logic and is rooted in the motives of socializing and information seeking. This finding thus reflects the double nature of social media as a means for both information retrieval and social grooming.
Book
Full-text available
Die Bedeutung der sogenannten Informationsintermediäre für die Meinungsbildung ist empirisch bislang wenig untersucht. Im Mittelpunkt der Expertise steht die Frage, ob und wie wirkungsvoll insbesondere Facebook die Themenwahrnehmung, Meinungsvermittlung und Meinungsbildung bei politischen Themen beeinflusst. Dabei deckt die Untersuchung verschiedene Stufen des Meinungsbildungsprozesses ab und belegt sehr unterschiedliche Wirkmechanismen. Welchen Stellenwert nimmt Facebook in der Nachrichtenrezeption im Vergleich zu traditionellen Massenmedien ein? Wie beeinflusst Facebook das wahrgenommene Themenspektrum? Fühlen sich Nutzer, die Facebook als Informationsquelle verwenden, besser informiert als andere? Außerdem wird untersucht, ob Facebook-Nutzer häufiger ihre eigene Meinung zu einem bestimmten Thema äußern und ob Themen über Facebook kontroverser wahrgenommen werden als über andere Informationsquellen. Die vorliegenden Ergebnisse liefern Anhaltspunkte, ob und wie Algorithmen-basierte Vermittlungslogiken die wahrnehmbare Medienvielfalt verengen, automatisierte Personalisierung von Onlineinhalten zur Bildung von Teilöffentlichkeiten beiträgt und an welchen Stellen medienpolitische Regulierungsmaßnahmen ansetzen könnten.
Chapter
Full-text available
Dieser Beitrag geht der Frage nach, ob der journalistische und redaktionelle Einsatz von Twitter zu einem publizistischen Mehrwert beiträgt. Von Interesse ist, ob auf Twitter eine reflexive Praxis zum Medienwesen und zum Journalismus gepflegt wird, die journalistische Twitter-Nutzung also ein Korrektiv für die in etablierten Informationsmedien erodierende Medienkritik darstellt, ob Twitter dem Anspruch des „Sozialen“ (Social Media) gerecht wird, d.h. die Möglichkeiten zur Interaktion auch tatsächlich genutzt werden und wie es um die Qualität der Twitter-Kommunikation (einschliesslich der verlinkten Medieninhalte) bestellt ist. Diese Frage ist deshalb von Bedeutung, weil die Einführung neuer Informationstechnologien – so auch jene des Social Web – regelmässig von unkritisch-euphorischen Positionen begleitet ist, was zum Beispiel die demokratiefördernden Potentiale dieser neuen Medien anbelangt (vgl. etwa Neuss 2008: 5).
Article
Full-text available
On social network sites (SNS), people are increasingly confronted with news content—even if they have not actively been looking for it. Although it is widely recognized that SNS have become a main driver for such incidental news exposure, we know little about the factors that influence whether users engage with news encountered on SNS. Thus, this study investigates under which conditions incidental news exposure becomes actual engagement with news by asking how both the perception of the news post and general news usage patterns influence the intention to read news articles encountered on SNS as well as the intention to look for further information about the covered issues. Building on a mobile forced experience sampling study consisting of 840 Facebook news encounters reported from 124 participants, we find that news engagement is mostly determined by participants’ perceived interestingness of and prior knowledge about the issue of the news post and to a much lesser degree by social factors unique to SNS (i.e., feelings towards the spreader of the news). In contrast, no influence of content-independent news usage patterns on news engagement could be observed.
Article
Full-text available
Social media users are able to read, share, and discuss news online with other people coming from diverse contexts in their lives, including family members, co-workers, and friends. Past research has indicated that “context collapse” occurs when people must imagine and negotiate interacting with a large and diverse online audience. Using survey data from 771 US Internet users, we find that more context collapse in people’s Facebook friends is positively related to both sharing and reading news. Furthermore, reading news on Facebook mediates the relationship between context collapse and news sharing. Finally, privacy management moderates the relationship between reading and sharing news on Facebook, where people who are more open in their privacy management practices share more news.
Article
Full-text available
The rise of digital intermediaries such as search engines and social media is profoundly changing our media environment. Here, we analyze how news media organizations handle their relations to these increasingly important intermediaries. Based on a strategic case study, we argue that relationships between publishers and platforms are characterized by a tension between (1) short-term, operational opportunities and (2) long-term strategic worries about becoming too dependent on intermediaries. We argue that these relationships are shaped by news media’s fear of missing out, the difficulties of evaluating the risk/reward ratios, and a sense of asymmetry. The implication is that news media that developed into an increasingly independent institution in the 20th century—in part enabled by news media organizations’ control over channels of communication—are becoming dependent upon new digital intermediaries that structure the media environment in ways that not only individual citizens but also large, resource-rich, powerful organizations have to adapt to.
Article
Full-text available
With social media at the forefront of today’s media context, citizens may perceive they don’t need to actively seek news because they will be exposed to news and remain well-informed through their peers and social networks. We label this the “news-finds-me perception,” and test its implications for news seeking and political knowledge: “news-finds-me effects.” U.S. panel-survey data show that individuals who perceive news will find them are less likely to use traditional news sources and are less knowledgeable about politics over time. Although the news-finds-me perception is positively associated with news exposure on social media, this behavior doesn’t facilitate political learning. These results suggest news continues to enhance political knowledge best when actively sought.
Book
Dieses Lehrbuch zum Thema Befragung bietet Interessierten und Studierenden aus kommunikationswissenschaftlicher Sicht einen umfassenden, kompakten sowie aktuellen Überblick über die Methode. Ziel des Buches ist es, das Erhebungsinstrument der standardisierten Befragung – basierend auf neuesten wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnissen – ausführlich und zuverlässig darzustellen. Das Lehrbuch ist leicht verständlich, klar gegliedert und didaktisch aufbereitet sowie mit zahlreichen aktuellen Beispielen versehen. Darüber hinaus werden Einsatzbereiche und Probleme der Methode diskutiert, verschiedene Ansichten gegenübergestellt sowie Empfehlungen gegeben. Betont wird der klare Anwendungsbezug. Die verwendeten Beispiele stammen aus der Medien- bzw. Kommunikationswissenschaft oder sind der markt- und meinungsforscherischen Praxis entliehen. Für die dritte Auflage wurde der Band grundlegend überarbeitet und aktualisiert. Der Inhalt Die standardisierte Befragung als wissenschaftlich-empirische Methode • Das Interview als soziale Situation • Die Formulierung des Fragebogens • Modi der Befragung • Varianten der Befragung: Längsschnitt-Design und situative Befragungen • Durchführung der Befragung Die Autorinnen Dr. Wiebke Möhring ist Professorin für Online-/Printjournalismus am Institut für Journalistik der TU Dortmund. Dr. Daniela Schlütz ist Professorin für Theorie und Empirie der digitalen Medien an der Filmuniversität Babelsberg Konrad Wolf.
Chapter
This volume offers insights into current research on the reception and effects of the digital revolution in public communication in the field of communication science. The contributions it contains deal with questions about the use of news on Facebook, the articulation of opinions on the public Net and the influencing of opinions on social media (e.g. by influencers). They document the current state of research and knowledge in this field, answer current open questions on an empirical basis and provide suggestions for future research. With contributions by Patrick Weber, Frank Mangold, Miriam Steiner, Melanie Magin, Birgit Stark, Pascal Jürgens, Anna Sophie Kümpel, Larissa Leonhard, Veronika Karnowski, Claudia Wilhelm, Ines Engelmann, Stefan Geiß, German Neubaum, Manuel Cargnino, Davina Berthelé, Priska Breves, Helene Schüler, Benedikt Spangardt, Kerstin Thummes
Article
PERVASIVE SOCIO-TECHNICAL NETWORKS bring new conceptual and technological challenges to developers and users alike. A central research theme is evaluation of the intensity of relations linking users and how they facilitate communication and the spread of information. These aspects of human relationships have been studied extensively in the social sciences under the framework of the “strength of weak ties” theory proposed by Mark Granovetter. Some research has considered whether that theory can be extended to online social networks like Facebook, suggesting interaction data can be used to predict the strength of ties. The approaches being used require handling user-generated data that is often not publicly available due to privacy concerns. Here, we propose an alternative defnition of weak and strong ties that requires knowledge of only the topology of the social network (such as who is a friend of whom on Facebook), relying on the fact that online key insights.
Article
With social networking site (SNS) use now ubiquitous in American culture, researchers have started paying attention to its effects in a variety of domains. This study explores the relationships between measures of Facebook use and political knowledge levels using a pair of representative samples of U.S. adults. We find that although the mere use of Facebook was unrelated to political knowledge scores, how Facebook users report engaging with the SNS was strongly associated with knowledge levels. Importantly, the increased use of Facebook for news consumption and news sharing was negatively related to political knowledge levels. Possible explanations and implications are discussed.
Chapter
Die zwei universellen Charakteristiken menschlichen Handelns sind das Streben nach Wirksamkeit und die Organisation des Handelns in Phasen von Zielengagement und Zieldistanzierung. Die Motivation einer Person, ein bestimmtes Ziel zu verfolgen, hängt von situativen Anreizen, persönlichen Präferenzen und deren Wechselwirkung ab. Motivationale und volitionale Handlungsregulationen wechseln sich zu verschiedenen Handlungsphasen optimalerweise trennscharf und effizient ab. Individuelle Unterschiede in der Motivations- und Volitionsregulation können beträchtlich sein. Die Entwicklung der motivationalen und volitionalen Steuerung von Verhalten beginnt in der frühen Kindheit und ist eng mit dem Verhalten erwachsener Bezugspersonen verknüpft. Die handelnde Beeinflussung der eigenen Entwicklung setzt die Wirksamkeitsbestrebungen des Heranwachsenden fort und verleiht der dialektischen Wechselwirkung zwischen Person und Umwelt über die Lebenszeit erst recht Dynamik.
Chapter
Nutzerkommentare machen Publikumsreaktionen auf und Anschlusskommunikation über journalistische Inhalte öffentlich und gelten als eine der am häufigsten genutzten Formen von Leserbeteiligung am Journalismus. Aufgrund ihrer Popularität, ihrer kontroversen Natur und den Herausforderungen, die mit der Implementierung einer Kommentarfunktion auf Nachrichtensites im Internet entstehen, werden Nutzerkommentare inzwischen von vielen Forscherinnen und Forschern untersucht. Der Beitrag liefert einen systematischen Überblick über Studien im Bereich der Journalismusforschung, der Nutzer- und Nutzungsforschung sowie der Medieninhalts- und Medienwirkungsforschung. Durch diesen integrativen Überblick soll der Gegenstand systematisch durchleuchtet und ein großer Teil des verfügbaren Literaturkorpus synthetisiert werden, um Diskussionen in Wissenschaft und Medienöffentlichkeit ein theoretisches und empirisches Fundament zu geben, Forschungslücken zu identifizieren und künftige Projekte in diesem Bereich anzustoßen.
Article
Social media pose serious challenges for uses-and-gratifications research, such as the entangled use of contemporary media services. This paper proposes a measurement approach which addresses this challenge. We build on the conceptualization of Facebook as a toolkit of features (Smock, Ellison, Lampe, & Wohn, 2011) in order to search for functional domains underlying the individual usage of Facebook features. These functional domains enable us to measure usage of social media in a differentiated and congruent way. To demonstrate the measure's heuristic power, we focus on the dichotomy between contributing and consuming social media content. Based on a survey with 482 Facebook users we find a user's contributiveness being related to specific gratification expectations, if and only if the measures control for a general bias of liking Facebook. We conclude that measuring social media usage by measuring the usage of distinct features can serve as valuable complement for uses-and-gratifications research.
Article
With the migration from traditional news media to social media, understanding how citizens learn about politics and current affairs from these sources has become increasingly important. Based on the concept of network media logic, distinct from traditional mass media logic, this study investigates whether using social media as a source of political news compensates for not using traditional news media in terms of political and current affairs learning. Using two panel studies conducted in two different political contexts—an election setting and a nonelection setting—the results show positive learning effects from using traditional news media and online news websites, but not from using social media. Taken together, the findings suggest that using social media to follow news about politics and current affairs does not compensate for not using traditional news media in terms of learning a diverse and broad set of general political news.
Article
Die sozialwissenschaftliche Analyse von qualitativen Daten, die Text- und Inhaltsanalyse lassen sich heute sehr effektiv mit Unterstützung von Computerprogrammen durchführen. Der Einsatz von QDA-Software verspricht mehr Effizienz und Transparenz der Analyse. Dieses Buch gibt einen Überblick über diese neuen Arbeitstechniken, diskutiert die zugrunde liegenden methodischen Konzepte (u.a. die Grounded Theory und die Qualitative Inhaltsanalyse) und gibt praktische Hinweise zur Umsetzung.
Article
Facebook ist als eine der reichweitenstärksten Social Media Plattformen längst auch Informationsquelle für politische Nachrichten. Durch dessen Funktion als Informationsintermediär werden Nachrichten intendiert und aktiv, aber auch beiläufig und eher passiv rezipiert. Die Frage nach den Auswirkungen dieser Nutzungsform auf die politische Informiertheit der BürgerInnen ist bisher nur bedingt geklärt. Der vorliegende Beitrag beschäftigt sich mit der Frage, inwiefern die Nutzungsintensität sowie der Nutzungsmodus von Facebook mit dem politischen Faktenwissen der BürgerInnen und ihrem subjektiven Gefühl, gut informiert zu sein, zusammenhängen. Basierend auf Daten einer für die deutschsprachige Bevölkerung Deutschlands repräsentativen Telefonbefragung zeigt sich, dass die Facebook-Nutzung das tatsächliche Faktenwissen nicht beeinflusst. Wohl aber finden sich Unterschiede in der subjektiven Informiertheit, je nachdem ob Facebook gezielt zur Nachrichtenrezeption verwendet wird. Dabei spielt auch das politische Interesse der NutzerInnen eine wichtige Rolle, insbesondere wenn es darum geht, ob zufällige Informationskontakte auf Facebook einen Beitrag zum Informiertheitsgefühl der BürgerInnen leisten.
Article
This work extends the masspersonal communication model (MPCM; O'Sullivan & Carr, 2017) by introducing anticipated interaction as a way to understand variations within the masspersonal continuum. Drawing from Thompson's mediated communication framework (1995), we argue that anticipated interaction paves the way for establishing a communicative relationship between interactants. In social media, this relationship is rooted in a sender's expectations for audience response and the imagined responsive audience. Using experience sampling, we show that anticipated interaction varies across social media. Further, we outline the relational and situational factors associated with expecting response and the specificity of imagined responsive audience. These variations and their sources characterize masspersonal communication as a socially and technologically situated practice shaped by multiple intersecting influences.
Article
The growing reliance on social media as news platforms may lead to more passive news consumption, but also offers greater potential for engaging in news. This study investigates the role of engagement with news content on Facebook and Twitter between news exposure and current events knowledge. An online survey (N = 400) tests the relationships between social media news seeking, incidental exposure to news on social media, engagement in shared news content, cognitive elaboration, and current events knowledge. The results show that both active seeking of and incidental exposure to news on both sites are linked to engagement, which is linked to greater cognitive elaboration about the content. Furthermore, engagement mediates the relationship between both types of news exposure and cognitive elaboration. However, engagement and elaboration are not related to knowledge. These results indicate that the key role of social media in news content is not knowledge gain, but the ability to engage users who may be passively receiving news on these sites. This study extends the cognitive mediation model of learning from the news in the context of current social media, with updated news consumption norms such as engagement with news on these sites, and incidental news exposure.
Article
Scholars have questioned the potential for incidental exposure in high-choice media environments. We use online survey data to examine incidental exposure to news on social media (Facebook, YouTube, Twitter) in four countries (Italy, Australia, United Kingdom, United States). Leaving aside those who say they intentionally use social media for news, we compare the number of online news sources used by social media users who do not see it as a news platform, but may come across news while using it (the incidentally exposed), with people who do not use social media at all (non-users). We find that (a) the incidentally exposed users use significantly more online news sources than non-users, (b) the effect of incidental exposure is stronger for younger people and those with low interest in news and (c) stronger for users of YouTube and Twitter than for users of Facebook.
Article
Social networking sites are popular tools to engage citizens in political campaigns, social movements, and civic life. However, are the effects of social media on civic and political participation revolutionary? How do these effects differ across political contexts? Using 133 cross-sectional studies with 631 estimated coefficients, I examine the relationship between social media use and engagement in civic and political life. The effects of social media use on participation are larger for political expression and smaller for informational uses, but the magnitude of these effects depends on political context. The effects of informational uses of social media on participation are smaller in countries like the United States, with a free and independent press. If there is a social media revolution, it relates to the expression of political views on social networking sites, where the average effect size is comparable to the effects of education on participation.
Article
Media consumers often lack the motivation, time, or cognitive capacity to select content in a deliberate way; instead, they opt for mental shortcuts. Brands are important in this regard because they simplify decision making. In the present study we investigated whether attitudes toward news media brands predict news choice. It is important that we conceptualized attitudes on two different levels: Although explicit attitudes are defined as overtly expressed, more or less deliberate evaluations, implicit attitudes are defined as automatically activated, gut-level evaluations. The supplementary use of implicit attitudes is consistent with current theorizing highlighting that deeply held and sometimes even unconscious evaluations influence media choice. Using a web-based study, we found that implicit and explicit attitudes toward television brands predicted choice. Each attitude construct predicted variance beyond that predicted by the other. We discuss implications by emphasizing the role of automatic, gut-level decision making in current high-choice media environments.
Book
Agenda-Setting — ein kommunikationswissenschaftliches Alltagsphänomen? Zusammenfassung Über drei Jahre mußte der jüdische Artilleriehauptmann Alfred Dreyfus, zu Unrecht des Landesverrats bezichtigt, in der Verbannung zubringen. Erst am 13. Januar 1898 wurden weite Kreise der Bevölkerung auf das Skandalurteil aufmerksam — durch Emile Zolas offenen Brief an den Präsidenten, der auf der Titelseite der Zeitung L’Aurore erschien. Unter der Überschrift »J’accuse« (»Ich beschuldige«) thematisierte er die Affäre und setzte eine öffentliche Diskussion in Gang, die letztendlich zur Rehabilitierung von Dreyfus führte.1 Die exponierte Präsentation der bis dahin kaum publiken Ereignisse, die Person des Autors und der Stellenwert, den das Thema im Medium aufwies, positionierten das Thema auch auf der Tagesordnung der Öffentlichkeit. Dies setzte das politische System unter Druck und erzwang eine zufriedenstellende Lösung des Problems.2
Article
Facebook ist zur wichtigsten Quelle für Webseiten-Traffic von Online-Nachrichten-Angeboten geworden. Um den Facebook-Traffic-Anteil zu maximieren, müssen Nachrichten möglichst weit innerhalb von Facebook verbreitet werden – und die Nachrichtenanbieter den Spielregeln des News Feed-Algorithmus folgen. Diese Studie untersucht, inwieweit sich durch Facebooks algorithmusgesteuerte, interaktionsbelohnende Nachrichtendistribution die redaktionelle Themenselektion verändert. Dazu werden die Themen von Facebook-Posts und Printausgaben von drei deutschen Regionalzeitungen für 2015 und 2016 inhaltsanalytisch verglichen. Ergänzend werden Experteninterviews mit Social-Media-Redakteuren zweier Regionalzeitungen geführt. Ergebnisse zeigen eine Interaktions- und Algorithmusorientierung bei der Themenselektion der Social-Media-Redakteure. Die Redakteure folgen den Spielregeln des News Feed-Algorithmus jedoch nicht bedingungs- und strategielos. Um die Interaktion und Reichweite zu maximieren – aber auch um Hardnews zu platzieren – werden verstärkt Human-Interest-Themen gepostet. Diese Softnews sorgen für Reichweite und Interaktionen, Hardnews für die Informiertheit der User. Somit verzichten Redaktionen der Regionalzeitungen nicht auf relevante Themen auf Facebook, aber nutzen einen höheren Anteil an Softnews, um ihre Facebook-Reichweite nicht zu gefährden.
Article
Web search engines act as gatekeepers when people search for information online. Research has shown that search engine users seem to trust the search engines' ranking uncritically and mostly select top-ranked results. This study further examines search engine users' selection behavior. Drawing from the credibility and information research literature, we test whether the presence or absence of certain credibility cues influences the selection probability of search engine results. In an observational study, participants (N = 247) completed two information research tasks on preset search engine results pages, on which three credibility cues (source reputation, message neutrality, and social recommendations) as well as the search result ranking were systematically varied. The results of our study confirm the significance of the ranking. Of the three credibility cues, only reputation had an additional effect on selection probabilities. Personal characteristics (prior knowledge about the researched issues, search engine usage patterns, etc.) did not influence the preference for search results linked with certain credibility cues. These findings are discussed in light of situational and contextual characteristics (e.g., involvement, low-cost scenarios).
Article
Today, the internet serves a wealth of news sources that encourages selective exposure to attitude-consistent and likeminded information. Several cues have been proposed to influence selective exposure, including partisanship, familiarity, and differential framing techniques. This study investigates the effects of news brand partisanship and news lead partisanship on selective exposure behaviors to internet news stories. With online news, it is possible that news brands believed to have a particular partisan bias may feature stories with an opposite partisan bias. This paper asks which of the two tested selective exposure cues used in this study participants respond to in an online news search environment. Using a non-college adult sample of 382 participants, this study confirms that selective exposure behavior is robust in a simulated news search environment and that news brand partisanship is a more powerful predictor of exposure than is news lead partisanship. The study finds, however, that the news brand effect on selective exposure is diminished when the news brand partisanship and news lead conflict with one another. The implications of the findings are discussed, and future directions for research are proposed.
Article
Has the introduction of social media into the information landscape changed the heuristics individuals use when selecting news? Social media allow users to easily share and endorse political content. These features facilitate personal influence, possibly increasing the salience of partisan information, making users more likely to read endorsed content. To test this possibility, I utilize snowball sampling to conduct a survey experiment featuring mock Facebook News Feeds. These feeds contain different levels of social media activity attributed to different sources, varying from fictional individuals to subjects’ own friends and family members. I find that online endorsements and discussions serve as heuristics when deciding which content to consume, outweighing partisan selectivity. This effect is only significant when the activity comes from friends or family members, as social influence attributed to fictional individuals has no effect on information selectivity.
Book
Unser Alltag wird immer mehr von Medien bestimmt. Dazu gehören nicht nur die Massenmedien, sondern auch Medien der interpersonalen Kommunikation, gewissermaßen vom Brief bis zur Email. Das Buch führt grundlegend in das Thema ein. Ausgehend von den Grundlagen der interpersonalen Kommunikation wird der Frage nachgegangen, was es bedeutet, wenn Menschen Medien benutzen und wie sich dadurch die zwischenmenschliche Kommunikation verändert. Dabei werden nicht zuletzt einzelne Medien näher betrachtet und in einen Gesamtzusammenhang einer veränderten Medienökologie eingeordnet. Der Inhalt Interpersonale Kommunikation und Medien.- Was ist interpersonale Kommunikation?.- Was bedeutet es, wenn Menschen ein Medium verwenden?.- Der Brief und die Kultur der schriftlichen Kommunikation.- Der Telegraf und die Erfindung der Schnelligkeit.- Das Telefon als erstes Medium der Telepräsenz.- Internet und E-Mail.-Kontakte und Beziehungen.- Mobile Kommunikation.- Beziehungen zu Medien.- Alltagswelten als Medienwelten.- Medien und der Verlust der Privatheit. Die Zielgruppen Dozierende und Studierende der Medien- und Kommunikationswissenschaft Der Autor Dr. Joachim R. Höflich ist Professor für Kommunikationswissenschaft an der Universität Erfurt.
Article
Social media use is prevalent in today's society and has contributed to problems with social media addiction. The goal of the study was to investigate whether extraversion, neuroticism, attachment style, and fear of missing out (FOMO) were predictors of social media use and addiction. Participants in the study (N = 207) volunteered to complete a brief survey measuring levels of extraversion, neuroticism, attachment styles, and FOMO. In the final model of a hierarchical regression, younger age, neuroticism, and fear of missing out predicted social media use. Only fear of missing out predicted social media addiction. Attachment anxiety and avoidance predicted social media addiction, but this relationship was no longer significant after the addition of FOMO.
Book
Der Band führt in die praktischen Grundlagen von Social Media ein und zeigt, wie sich durch Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Youtube & Co. der Journalismus verändert hat. Er legt dar, wie die einzelnen Dienste sinnvoll im redaktionellen Alltag eingesetzt werden und wo Potential für weitergehende redaktionelle Strategien zu sehen ist. Eine wichtige Rolle wird dem Zusammenspiel mit dem Leser/Zuschauer/Zuhörer eingeräumt. Denn dieser rückt von der rein passiven Rezipienten-Rolle in die aktive Rolle eines Partners des Journalisten. Auch will der Umgang mit User-Material gelernt sein. Vom Überprüfen und Verifizieren von Youtube-Videos bis zum redaktionellen Crowdsourcing bietet das Buch Checklisten und Muster-Konzepte sowie Beispiele aus der Praxis. Der Inhalt Social Media-Dienste und Funktionen.- Publizieren ohne Auftrag.- Vom Leser/Hörer/Seher (User) zum Partner.- Meme und Internet-Phänomene.- Social Media im redaktionellen Einsatz.- Der Umgang mit der Community.- Arbeiten mit Material aus dem Netz.- Rechtliche Fallstricke. Die Zielgruppen - JournalistInnen in Aus- und Weiterbildung, Praktikum, Volontariat, Akademie, Journalistenschule - Dozierende und Studierende der Kommunikationswissenschaft, Journalistik und PR Der Autor Stefan Primbs ist Journalist und Medientrainer und arbeitet seit 2010 als Social-Media-Beauftragter beim Bayerischen Rundfunk. Zuvor war er unter anderem als Print- und Online-Redakteur bei der Passsauer Neuen Presse, FOCUS Online, Gruner + Jahr und als CvD bei BR.de tätig.
Article
In May 2016, two stories on Facebook’s Trending Topics news feature appeared on the site Gizmodo, the first exposing the human curators working surreptitiously to select news and the second containing accusations that certain curators censored conservative voices. These revelations led to public outcry, mostly from conservatives upset at possible bias and journalists critical of Facebook for its largely secretive and haphazard approach to news. This study examines the response to the controversy as metajournalistic discourse—talk about news that seeks to define appropriate practices and legitimate news forms. It identifies a fundamental divergence in the public articulation of Facebook’s role in the larger news ecosystem. Facebook reacted to the controversy by formulating an approach to news as a form of content that, like other content on the site, should be personalized, organized according to popularity in the form of user engagement, and free of editorial control from the social media site. By contrast, journalists positioned news as purposively selected and shared while placing Facebook as an active participant within the news ecosystem and therefore beholden to an enhanced institutional commitment to public responsibility.