Azerbaijan Journal of Educational Studies Volume 2018, Issue 2

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Abstract
Azerbaijan Journal of Educational Studies — Open Access Journal Azerbaijan Journal of Eucational Studies ("Azərbaycan Məktəbi" - in native language) is an international, scientific, theoretical and pedagogical, peer-reviewed open access academic journal published quarterly online by Mnistry of Education of the Republic of Azerbaijan. The Journal has been published since 1924. ISSN: 0134-3289 © 2018 Azerbaijan Journal of Educational Studies, Baku, Azerbaijan. Website: www.journal.edu.az E-Mail: editor@journal.edu.az
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