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LMX and employee organizational citizenship behaviors: Moderation by job insecurity climate

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This study aims to further knowledge on the mechanisms through which job insecurity is related to negative outcomes. Based on appraisal theory, two explanations-perceived control and psychological contract breach-were theoretically integrated in a comprehensive model and simultaneously examined as mediators of the job insecurity-outcome relationship. Different categories of outcomes were considered, namely work-related (i.e. vigour and need for recovery) and general strain (i.e. mental and physical health complaints), as well as psychological (i.e. job satisfaction and organizational commitment) and behavioural coping reactions (i.e. self-rated performance and innovative work behaviour). The hypotheses were tested using data of a heterogeneous sample of 2413 Flemish employees by means of both single and multiple mediator structural equation modelling analyses (bootstrapping method). Particularly, psychological contract breach accounted for the relationship between job insecurity and strain. Both perceived control and psychological contract breach mediated the relationships between job insecurity and psychological coping reactions, although the indirect effects were larger for psychological contract breach. Finally, perceived control was more important than psychological contract breach in mediating the relationships between job insecurity and behavioural coping reactions. This study meets previous calls for a theoretical integration regarding mediators of the job insecurity-outcome relationship. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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Using the group engagement model, we hypothesize that two differentiated leadership constructs – LMX differentiation at the group level and a new construct, LMX relational separation, at the individual-within-group level – interact with LMX to affect follower citizenship behaviors (OCB) and turnover intentions. Data from 223 followers and their leaders situated across 60 workgroups demonstrate that the effects of individual perceived LMX quality are contingent upon a group's overall variability in LMX (i.e., LMX differentiation) and employees' similarity in terms of LMX with their coworkers (i.e., LMX relational separation). Specifically, the effects of high quality LMX relationships on OCB and turnover intentions are weaker when group LMX differentiation or employees' LMX relational separation is higher, rather than lower. Our findings contribute to a growing stream of multilevel LMX research incorporating climate effects and offer an alternative view of differentiated leadership in groups. Key implications for theory and practice are discussed.
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The aim of this study is to examine the impact of superior's emotional intelligence (EI) and leader-member exchange (LMX) on organisational citizenship behaviour (OCB). Using a sample of 200 supervisor-subordinates dyads working in four financial institutions located in Klang Valley, Malaysia, this study hypothesised that emotional intelligence and leader-member exchange would have a stronger relationship to organisational citizenship behaviour. The results revealed that use of emotions (UOE), other's emotions appraisal (OEA), and regulation of emotion (ROE) were the dimensions of emotional intelligence to predict employee organisational citizenship behaviour. Both UOE and OEA shared the same findings with 52.7% of the variance on conscientiousness respectively. On the other hand, OEA was also found to be significantly influencing sportsmanship with only 6.3% of the variance and ROE was found to predict civic virtue with 26.7% of the variance. Meanwhile, LMX of subordinates was found to moderate the relationships between only one EI dimension and OCB-civic virtue. A difference between male and female emotional intelligence and organisational citizenship behaviour were also analysed. Future research and practical implications are also discussed.
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The study developed an integrated model of the relationship among leader–member exchange (LMX), outcome favorability, procedural fairness climate and employee organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). Using three-phrase multilevel data from multiple sources collected from 238 employees working with 42 supervisors at manufacturing firms in China, we found that (1) LMX was positively related to outcome favorability and OCB, (2) procedural fairness climate moderated the relationship between outcome favorability and OCB, and (3) the indirect effect of LMX on OCB (via outcome favorability) was stronger when procedural fairness climate was high rather than low. The study provides insight on the LMX–OCB relationship and the integration of LMX and fairness research.
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In 1940 Lindquist presented a discussion of an analysis of variance using the group mean as the unit of analysis. Unfortunately, most modern writers on statistical methodology have ignored this important topic and some of the best text-book book writers make the error of using the individual as the unit of analysis when the group mean would be more appropriate. The reluctance to use group mean as the unit of analysis is due in part to the belief that the resultant drop in the number of observations per treatment greatly reduces the probability of detecting a treatment effect. This concern is put in perspective in this paper and equations are presented to facilitate power estimates when the group mean is the unit of analysis.
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Previous organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) research (a) has not demonstrated that extra-role behaviors can be distinguished empirically from in-role activities, and (b) has not examined the relative contributions of components ofjob satisfaction a nd organizational commitment to the performance of OCBs. Factor analysis of survey data from 127 employees' supervisors supported the distinction between in-role behaviors and two forms of OCBs. Hierarchical regression analysis found two job cognitions variables (intrinsic and extrinsic) to be differentially related to the two types OCBs, but affective variables and organizational commitment were not significant predictors. The link between the present findings and previous research is discussed, as are directions forfuture research.
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Simple slopes, regions of significance, and confidence bands are commonly used to evaluate interactions in multiple linear regression (MLR) models, and the use of these techniques has recently been extended to multilevel or hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) and latent curve analysis (LCA). However, conducting these tests and plotting the conditional relations is often a tedious and error-prone task. This article provides an overview of methods used to probe interaction effects and describes a unified collection of freely available online resources that researchers can use to obtain significance tests for simple slopes, compute regions of significance, and obtain confidence bands for simple slopes across the range of the moderator in the MLR, HLM, and LCA contexts. Plotting capabilities are also provided.
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Introduction Contracting A Modern Dilemma Contract Making The Contract Makers Contemporary Contracts Violating the Contract Changing the Contract Business Strategy and Contracts Trends in the New Social Contract
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Composition models specify the functional relationships among phenomena or constructs at different levels of analysis (e.g., individual level, team level, organizational level) that reference essentially the same content but that are qualitatively different at different levels (M. T. Hannan, 1971; K. H. Roberts, C. L. Hulin, & D. M. Rousseau, 1978; D. M. Rousseau, 1985). Specifying adequate composition models is a critical component of good multilevel research. A typology of composition models is proposed to provide a framework for organizing, evaluating, and developing constructs and theories in multilevel research. Five basic forms of composition are described and illustrated. Implications of the typology are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)