Conference Paper

Facilitating Pretend Play in Autistic Children: Results from an Augmented Reality App Evaluation

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Abstract

Autistic children find pretend play difficult. Previous work suggests Augmented Reality (AR) has potential in eliciting pretend play in children with autism. This paper presents the evaluation of an Augmented Reality app to help autistic children engage in solitary pretend play. We followed a user-centred design process, involving various techniques and stakeholders. Results from a pre-post study design suggest the AR system is promising in facilitating quantitative aspects of pretend play in autistic children.

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... Most part of these studies, presented social skills as the variable to improve with the AR technology (56%). Daily living skills were identified when discriminating objects through object recognition and interaction gestures with it [34], as well as the ability to pretend play with toys [42]. Communication ability, for verbal communication, was evaluated by analysing benefits in speech-language [29]. ...
... The technologies used for the AR systems are diverse, having smartglasses (Empowered Brain [38,[43][44][45]) and Computer screens [29,42] (specifying the use of a webcam [37,40]) as the more common technologies used, where 4 cases of each technology were observed. Mobile devices were also common to find (3 smartphones [33][34][35] and 2 tablets [28,30]), followed by 2 video projections [35] (specifying the use of a Kinect [41]) and one that implemented the AR using the Google cardboard [39]. ...
... All reviewed records presented positive main findings regarding to their presented goals when using the AR technology. Among these main findings, we found that the AR system facilitates practicing and learning social skills [30,33,37,38,43,45], improves students' selective attention for more time [28,29,35,42], helps children to learn new things [29,36], and helps children to better understand the facial expressions and emotions [28,40]. Limitations presented within these studies, are mainly focused on involving larger samples [30,42,43,45], since these studies presented samples sizes between 1 and 12 participants, with an average sample size among all scanned records is 6.8, with an average deviation of 3.9. ...
Conference Paper
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Augmented Reality (AR) technology has been used for a wide range of areas, uncovering diverse benefits regarding to its usage. Focusing on medicine, AR is being used for the last few decades in several different tasks – from surgery support to treatment of phobias and other cognitive or physiological disorders. This study intends to focus on the usage of AR in one specific pathology: the rehabilitation of people that suffer from autism. This systematic review will present an overview of the usage of AR technology, from a patients’ perspective, where strengths and weaknesses of current approaches will be pointed out, to better understand good practices to follow when using AR for autism rehabilitation. The results from this systematic review will provide valuable information for further ideas and solutions regarding to enhance Autism Spectrum Disorder patients’ wellbeing.
... Where the social skills were restricted to learning the skill of identifying things and how to interact with them [13]. Learn the skill of interacting with dolls [14], besides that establishes verbal communication skills [15]. One skill is also the skill of attention [16] [17], also the development of educational psychological skills [18], and finally the skills that focus on acquiring cognitive skills [19]. ...
... The number of samples on which the hypotheses were applied. Through research, it was observed that the number of samples was reduced or limited since the samples did not exceed 12 participants in [14], [17], [22], [27]. Through our hypothesis, it is possible to cooperate with several centers specialized in the rehabilitation of people with ASD in our city, where it is expected that these centers can provide an adequate number of samples. ...
... No need for trainers and educators to use techniques and monitor results. With the complexity of the proposed regulations, people with ASD cannot use these techniques individually, but rather need a trainer and a specialist to operate some of the technologies [14], [15], [19], [24], [25], [26]. The system is the direct use of the system by an ASD patient, intending to enhance his independence. ...
... Spiel et al. explored the scope of technology with not only the CWA but also their parents and caregivers for improvement in social interactions and talked about offering visual aids for structuring daily activities [59]. Children's learning extends to games of pretending in a virtual reality setup that also involves adult supervision, which has been developed and evaluated by Dragomir et al. [30]. Realizing the needs and constraints of special school classrooms during the design process has been studied in depth in vSked [31], a visual scheduling system. ...
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A targeted review of computer-assisted learning for people with autism spectrum disorder: Towards a consistent methodology
  • S Fletcher-Watson
Fletcher-Watson, S., 2014. A targeted review of computer-assisted learning for people with autism spectrum disorder: Towards a consistent methodology. Review Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 1(2), pp.87-100.