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Poster: How to support girls’ participation at projects in makerspace settings. Overview on current recommendations

Authors:

Abstract

For our future making activities with children we have looked for relevant literature that gives us advice on how we can reach (more) girls in our activities within makerspaces as they are currently underrepresented. This includes answers on the following sub-questions: What do others do to reach girls? What do they recommend? Poster for a short paper that will be published under: Sandra Schön, Margarethe Rosenova, Martin Ebner and Maria Grandl (2018). How to support girls’ participation at projects in makerspace settings. Overview on current recommendations. In: Proceedings of the EduRobotics 2018 in Rome, Springer.
Methodology and Sources
Contact
DOIT has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon
2020 research and innovation programme under grant
agreement No 770063
Contact to authors:
sandra.schoen@salzburgresearch.at
margarethe.rosenova@salzburgresearch.at
martin.ebner@tugraz.at
maria.grandl@tugraz.at
Sandra Schön, Margarethe Rosenova, Martin Ebner and Maria Grandl
(2018). How to support girls’ participation at projects in makerspace
settings. Overview on current recommendations. In: Proceedings of
the EduRobotics 2018 in Rome, Springer.
AcknowledgementRead more
License
Sandra Schön, Margarethe Rosenova (both Salzburg Research, AT), Martin Ebner and Maria Grandl (both TU Graz, Austria)
Overview
Therefore we collected existing experiences from projects and research (including literature on girls
and maker education,girls in makerspaces, girls and robotics from the last five years in the ERIC
database (2013-2018). The resources can be found within the corresponding short paper published
in the EduRobotics 2018 proceedings.
Announce activity gender-sensitive
Titles and Events should give a sense of value of the activity, e.g. “Robotics for gardeners”
(and not „Robotic workshop for children“).
Less appealing are activities referring to professional identities that are less common among
girls, e.g. „Making for (future) engineers“.
Gender-sensitive language and gender-sensitive illustration are important, this includes e.g.
that girls are shown as active participants in the marketing materials.
Background and research question
For our future activities we have looked for relevant literature that gives us advice on how
we can reach (more) girls in our activities within makerspaces as they are currently
underrepresented. This includes answers on the following sub-questions: What do
others do to reach girls? What do they recommend?
1
Set girls' quota and low thresholds
If it is planned that children have to be registered for an event, the proportion of girls may be
smaller – as participation of boys is more actively supported by parents.
An enrolment procedure also allows a quota to be set for girls.
It is a must to set a 50 percent quota in co-operations.
2Integrate female tutors and role models
A same-sex role model seems to be a strong supporter to help girls to get in touch with
technology.
Role models are great especially if they can as well tell stories how they failed or other personal
stories.
3
Give collaborative prompts and assignments
Girls prefer activities that are collaborative.
Females will prefer activities that are collaborative, meaning that they have a positive outcome
for all that are involved - and are not a competition.
4Apply gender mainstreaming in makerspaces
Active gender mainstreaming in maker activities could therefore include gender mainstreaming
along the whole activity,
e.g. when tutors spends as much time talking with girls as with boys,
or when girls participate equally as presentator of results as boys.
It should be noted here that such a conscious - but not compulsive - proposal does not
necessarily meet with public approval.
5
12 3 4 5
Coding Workshop for
Interactive Stories
Maker-Workshop for
future astronauts
x
v
Maker days for kids
fun ideas for our youth club
v
v
Try to nd as many
creative solutions
for the challenge as possible!
Which group
can build the
highest construction?
x
v
Each team should nd
a solution which
uses only used materials.
v
Reserve places for
girls, if you embed
enrolment procedures
v
How to support girls’ participation
at projects in makerspace settings
... In all maker activities where technologies are being used, girls are typically underrepresented. In order to reach a higher participation this must be addressed with targeted gender-sensitive measures in the communication, organization and conduct of maker education (Schˆn et al., 2018). Such measures for instance include placing social questions before technical ones, and support female maker role models. ...
Article
Full-text available
Developing social innovation and entrepreneurship competences and skills of children and young people is on the agenda of European educational policy-makers. The European research and innovation project “DOIT – Entrepreneurial skills for young social innovators in an open digital world” suggests using makerspaces and tools, within schools and externally, to promote practice-based social innovation and entrepreneurial learning of children and young people. This article first gives an overview of different types of maker-spaces, addresses the concept of maker education, and highlights common development goals of such education with entrepreneurship education regarding particular attitudes and competences. The main part then describes the DOIT learning program that allows children and young people (6–16 years) to acquire skills and an entrepreneurial mind-set for turning creative ideas into potential social innovations. This program is currently trialed in DOIT pilots in different types of makerspaces in ten European countries. The article describes learning processes and outcomes that are promoted by the program with two examples that are different regarding the makerspaces, topics and other aspects. Some first experiences and lessons learned from these and other pilots are summarized.
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