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Does teaching on the "Other" side create a change

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... So far, the participation of Arab teachers in Jewish schools has been shown to be beneficial and successful (Gilat et al., 2020;Jayusi & Bekerman, 2019;Saada & Gross, 2019). For example, Agbariya et al. (2014) found that the social relationship between the Arab teachers and their peers transcended the boundaries of the school in contrast to Arab-Jewish social relations in other professional settings (such as high-tech companies), where the relations were found to be confined to the workplace. ...
... Similar to minority teachers around the world, AJs experience difficulties and challenges alongside their success. In several studies, AJs emphasized their sense of otherness during national holidays, such as Independence Day and Memorial Day (Hisherik et al., 2010;Jayusi & Bekerman, 2019;Saada & Gross, 2019). Within the highly militaristic Israeli society, Arab teachers who internalize power relations in Israeli society feel under constant scrutiny of their functioning and loyalty in society in general, and in schools in particular (Saada & Gross, 2019). ...
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This mixed-methods study examined the experiences of belonging/otherness among Arab teachers in Israel. A group of boundary-crossing teachers: Arab teachers in Jewish schools (AJ; N = 57) was compared with Arab teachers teaching in their own community (AA; N = 103). We found that the AJ group had a multicultural orientation, unlike the AA group, who were community-orientated. These orientations are reflected in different otherness sources, different motivations for selecting a workplace, and differences in identity ratings. While professional and social sources promoted teachers' sense of belonging in the two groups, the source of AJs' sense of otherness was the national divide as opposed to community-oriented aspects in AAs. Selfefficacy ratings were high in both groups with a significant advantage for AJs, an unanticipated finding given that most of them were women, had attended teacher training colleges rather than universities , and were rarely homeroom teachers. Arab teachers' involvement in Jewish schools was partial with a low proportion of classroom educators or teachers in managerial roles. AJs tend to leave their national identity outside the school, and are not involved in political discourse or in the staffroom power relations. The phenomenon of integrating AJs is relatively new, and within a segregated education system that limits the opportunities for Jews and Arabs to meet, it can provide a viable, albeit limited, tool to inhibit prejudice and antagonism between Jews and Arabs.
... The major argument for diversifying the teacher staff is that minority teachers may become role models for minority students and inspire them to pursue academic education (Auerbach, 2007;Guarino et al., 2006;Quiocho and Rios, 2000;Shipp, 1999). The phenomenon that will be examined in this paper is different, as boundary-crossing teaching in Israel is not encouraged for this reason but rather for promoting tolerance within the divided Israeli society (Jayusi and Bekerman, 2019;Saada and Gross, 2019). ...
... Similarly, two 2019 studies that employed interviews with Arab teachers in Jewish schools, found them to testify to the high satisfaction of all those involved. Boundary-crossing Arab teachers attested to having a good working relationship with principals, staff, students and parents and reported to have been able to reduce prejudice and foster common ground (Jayusi and Bekerman, 2019;Saada and Gross, 2019). ...
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Purpose- Minority teachers is a growing phenomenon that is encouraged as part of a quest to diversify teaching staff. Among minority teachers, there exists a group of boundary-crossing teachers whose "otherness" contrasts with the different student population and/or staffroom composition. The study aims to examine parent, teacher and student attitudes toward teachers crossing two types of "borders" that are central to Israeli society: the Jewish-Arab rift and the religious-secular rift. Design/methodology/approach- A representative sample of 182 Jewish Israeli parents, 201 Jewish Israeli students grades 10-12 and 101 Jewish Israeli teachers completed questionnaires regarding their attitudes toward boundary-crossing teachers. Findings-The overall attitudes toward cross-boundary teaching were positive. Attitudes were found to be associated with political affiliation, religiosity and age. The more left-wing participants were, the less religious and older the more they supported boundary-crossing teaching. Students were significantly less supportive of teachers crossing the Jewish-Arab divide compared with adults. The attitudes toward boundary-crossing ultra-orthodox teachers in a secular school showed a distinct pattern, as it received support from all divides of the research participants. Social implications-The findings point to the vicious cycle of segregation in Israeli society whereby the lack of contact between Jews and Arabs leads to intergroup anxiety which in turns leads to less support in further contact through boundary-crossing teaching, especially among high school students. Originality/value-The minority teachers' literature often refers to the need to diversify the teaching staff or examines teachers and their relations with students. This study if the first to examine how other stakeholders' view the idea of minority teachers.
... Several studies exposed the complex position that requires the Arab teacher to employ multiple strategies of bargaining in order to achieve maximum personal gain Sion, 2014). Thus, the teachers seek to self-preserve and reduce possible sources of danger alongside making the most of the opportunities they have within the unequal power relations in Israel (Jayusi & Bekerman, 2019aSaada & Gross, 2019a. Arab teachers feel the ambivalent gaze of the Jewish hegemony viewing them as partners on the one hand as the enemy on the other (Saada & Gross, 2019a;Sion, 2014). ...
... At second observation, the findings are congruent with findings of studies that examined the teaching of Arab teachers in Jewish schools over the past decade. In several studies, Jewish principals and AJ teachers testified to the high satisfaction of all those involved (Jayusi & Bekerman, 2019aSaada & Gross, 2019a. Moreover, AJ teachers and other stakeholders reported that the integration of AJ teachers promoted a climate of tolerance and acceptance (Bendes-Jacob & Mahool, 2013;Heisherik et al., 2010). ...
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Arab teachers in Jewish schools (AJ) constitute a unique case of minority teachers. This mixed-methods study set out to examine the school experience of AJ (N = 101) in comparison with two groups: Arab teachers in Arab schools (AA; N = 76) and Jewish teachers in Jewish schools (JJ; N = 99). The questionnaire measured three aspects of the teachers’ experience: motivational, professional and ecological. AJ teachers reported lower levels of professional difficulties than the two same-culture groups. Among AJ, novice and experienced teachers reported similar levels of motivation, while among the other groups, novice teachers reported lower levels. AJ teachers’ answers to an open-ended question enriched the understanding of the positive experiences alongside the negative aspects that included some incidents of racism and microaggression. The findings support the benefit of contact to positive attitudes and tolerance. Nonetheless, questions arise regarding the processes that underlie these results.
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Incl. bibl., abstract. The article reviews the research on teacher effectiveness and develops the case for a model of teacher effectiveness in which differential effectiveness is incorporated. Five problems with current concepts of teacher effectiveness are identified: undue influence of available techniques upon the concept; emphasis on school, to the detriment of teacher, effectiveness; tenuous relationship to teacher improvement; narrowness of operational definitions in research; and the development of generic, rather than differentiated, models. In addition the failure of existing models to explain variance in pupil outcome at the classroom level, the neglect of teacher self-evaluation, and the restricted measures of pupil outcomes are noted. A differential model is proposed incorporating five dimensions of difference. These refer to teacher activity, outside as well as inside the classroom; curriculum subject; pupil background factors; pupil personal characteristics; cultural and organisational contexts of teaching. The developmental functions of such a model for research and for teacher appraisal are explored. Four problems for implementing a differentiated model are raised: complexity, stakeholder expectations, values, and policy acceptability. These are considered in the light of the controversial Hay McBer model in England and of models developed in Europe and the USA in the early decades of the last century.
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Sumario: This dictionary gives nontechnical definitions of statistical and methodological terms used in the social and behavioral sciences. Special attention is paid to terms that most often prevent educated general readers from understanding journal articles and books in sociology, psychology, and political science and in applied fields that build on those disciplines, such as education, policy studies, and administrative science. It does not, for the most part, directly explain how to do research or how to compute the statistics briefly described
Bicultural identity, bilingualism, and psychological adjustment in multicultural societies: Immigration-based and globalization-based acculturation
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