Conference Paper

A BIM-Driven Approach to Managing Common Properties within Multi-Owned Developments

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Abstract

There has been a significant growth of multi-owned developments in cities around the world. These developments include a combination of different types of residential and commercial uses of urban spaces. Common property areas in multi-owned developments typically include a wide range of shared spaces and facilities. Clear and correct delineation of the spatial extent of common properties must be considered to avoid unintended consequences and costs in managing facilities within complex developments. Currently, subdivision plans are used as an artefact of knowledge for managing common properties in building developments. Communication and management of the spatial extent of both unlimited and limited common property areas could be a challenging task for Owners Corporation (OC) managers. Therefore, there is a need for providing not only a better approach to manage common properties in a more visual way but also adopt digital data management methods. One such approach-Building Information Modelling (BIM)-is currently used in the building industry. BIM is widely recognised as a common data environment for 3D lifecycle management of buildings. In this research, we suggest that BIM can be used to digitize 3D spatial structures of common properties in multi-owned developments.

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... There is a significant body of knowledge in using 3D information technologies to support the representation of 3D RRRs in the land administration industry. Building information modeling (BIM), which can be a feasible approach to visualize and manage spatial and semantic information of CP, is highly regarded as a visualization and communication tool for CP management [8]. In this research, BIM is considered as a suitable approach to managing information related to ownership RRRs of CP. ...
... Over the last decades, various research [10]- [12] has pointed out the limitations of 2D methods to represent cadastral information that shows the extent of RRR in MoD, particularly the development with complex geometric definitions. The interpretation and use of the plan are challenging for the OC community due to the 2D representation and information [8]. The diagrams in the plan show the difficulties in understanding of the cohesive spatial extent of CP through knitting abstracted representations together with textual notation; and higher incidence that same diagram reaches over different view. ...
... Barton et al. [20] extended the IFC standard for managing cadastral data for both indoor buildings as well as outdoor land parcels on the site. Atazadeh et al. [8] proposed an IFC extension capable of representing OC governance structure, the spatial arrangement of CP and ownership RRR. The large proportion of research focuses directly on integrating the legal data into the physical data within BIM data model. ...
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Conference Paper
With the growing trend toward the multi-owned developments (MoDs), the disputes over managing common properties (CP) in the developments become significant social and economic issues in urban areas. The lack of owners’ understanding of their ownership rights within MoD has exacerbated the disputes. Although the cadastral survey plans provide the legal information and mechanism for managing CP, the 2D plan-based communication of the 3D spatial and legal extent of CP remains as a challenging task for the owners corporation (OC) community in MoD. As a technical strategy for preventing disputes around CP, this research suggests a building information modeling (BIM)-based approach in the context of the Victoria state, Australia, to provide a digitalized data model for managing CP. This model can be used as a 3D integrated information repository of MoD to support CP management activities and facilitate the communication of the CP management information among the community.
... To overcome the challenges in managing land and property information using a 2D-based practice, communicating information about urban environments is no longer limited to 2D maps (Atazadeh, Rajabifard, Kalantari, & Shin, 2018). However, international initiatives to develop a 3D-based cadastre mainly address 3D visualization and 3D data models for specific aspects of land administration. ...
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Book
This collection is the first comparative study of the issues raised by multi-owned residential developments. The chapters draw on the empirical research of leading academics in the fields of planning, sociology, law and urban, property, tourism and environmental studies, and consider the practical problems of managing this type of housing. The book offers lessons from experiences in the UK, the US, Australia, New Zealand, Israel, Hong Kong, Singapore and China. © Sarah Blandy, Ann Dupuis and Jennifer Dixon 2010. All rights reserved.
Chapter
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The privatization of urban space, as represented in the trend towards a wide variety of common interest developments and increasing prevalence of gated communities, is an international phenomenon. Recent research has not systematically explored the ways in which these types of developments are collectively re-shaping the public and private realms of the city at large. This empirical study of community areas in a Canadian city describes a number of historical private neighbourhood development trends and their convergence in space and time. Based on the empirical generalizations, a conceptual model is developed to illustrate how the trends may have combined to produce a new geography or ecology of space privatization within the city, one in which the older public city is being circumscribed and bounded by new territories of multi-tiered privatization. KeywordsCanada–Gated communities–Neighbourhood–Private communities–Privatization of space–Urban social ecology
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This article attempts to provide researchers, legal practitioners, industry participants and stakeholders with an overview of the various legislative frameworks in the eight States and Territories around Australia. The article commences by providing a brief description of the development of the law of strata title in Australia and explaining its diverse nomenclature. This is followed by a jurisdictional analysis where each State or Territory is benchmarked against Queensland. Where possible the article flags important similarities and differences between jurisdictions in terms of governance arrangements, the creation of community title schemes and dispute resolution mechanisms. The article concludes that there should be a trend toward uniformity as each jurisdiction seeks to reform community title laws. Uniformity would be desirable in terms of both nomenclature and the structure of the legislation and associated regulations. Yes Yes
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Behnam Atazadeh, Abbas Rajabifard, Mohsen Kalantari and Jihye Shin A BIM-Driven Approach to Managing Common Properties within Multi-Owned Developments 6th International FIG 3D Cadastre Workshop 2-4 October 2018, Delft, The Netherlands 214
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