Article

2019- Caring for patients with Pickleball injuries

Authors:
  • Registered Nurse- Retired
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Abstract

There are over 2.5 million people, mostly seniors, playing pickleball. This article will examine associated injuries from this popular and fast growing paddle sport.

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... A PubMed search in December 2019 without language, date, or article type restrictions containing "pickleball" yielded four results; "pickle ball," two nonrelevant results; and "pickleball," 0 results. Four published articles exist on pickleball: one a brief editorial narrative (Q&A format) about caring for pickleball injuries (25), two articles explaining the psychological aspects of why older adults play pickleball but not on medical injuries (26,27), and one on pickleball injuries treated in emergency departments (28). Additional expanded search of the National Center for Biotechnology Information databases, including the National Library of Medicine Catalog and PubMed Central, Google Scholar, and manual searching of references of the above retrieved articles, yielded 14 more articles which were screened, with only one being relevant. ...
... The editorial was the first article that mentioned injuries (25). In this narrative, the author discussed pregame warm-up exercises and stretches, emphasized importance of protective eyewear and appropriate athletic shoe/sneaker use, and the option for wrist and ankle bracing. ...
... In this narrative, the author discussed pregame warm-up exercises and stretches, emphasized importance of protective eyewear and appropriate athletic shoe/sneaker use, and the option for wrist and ankle bracing. The author had played pickleball and proposed that common injuries are often actually preexisting injuries that recur or present as injuries similar to racquet sports (25). The author also reviewed various lay/ consumer pickleball web sites and outlined the commonly mentioned injuries, including sprains and strains, tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, rotator cuff injuries, distal extremity fractures, and head/facial trauma, including orbital trauma. ...
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Pickleball is a single or doubles volley sport played with paddles and ball on a hardcourt. Growing in popularity in recent years, injuries can occur similar to racquet sports; however, there is a scarcity of references in the literature for sports medicine providers encountering these athletes and injuries. This review provides clinicians treating pickleball athletes with an overview of the sport, a case study demonstrating the significant injuries that can occur in pickleball, and a review of the available literature. We provide a discussion on common pickleball injuries, injury prevention strategies, and event coverage recommendations to better equip sports medicine providers with a base of knowledge and a clinical approach to treat these athletes, or "picklers," who enjoy this fast-growing sport.
... A recent literature search did not reveal any published research describing specifi c injuries related to Pickleball. 4 However, there is published research on injuries associated with other racket sports. In tennis, a similar style racket sport played on a similar surface, the most common injuries are sprains/strains of the lower extremity, followed by sprains/strains of the upper extremity and injuries of the trunk and low back. ...
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The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of leisure involvement and leisure satisfaction on the well-being of pickleball players. This study enrolled 260 participants from the 2019 International Pickleball Tournament by purposive sampling. A total of 250 questionnaires were returned, for a return rate of 96%; 215 questionnaires were valid, for an effective recovery rate of 86%. The data were archived using SPSS 24.0, and the correlation between variables was analyzed using AMOS 24.0. By analyzing the empirical data in this paper, the following main findings were obtained: (1) leisure involvement has a significant effect on leisure satisfaction; (2) leisure involvement does not have a significant effect on well-being; (3) leisure satisfaction has a significant effect on well-being; and (4) leisure satisfaction has a mediating effect on the relationship between leisure involvement and well-being.
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Background Pickleball is growing rapidly with a passionate senior following. Understanding and comparing players’ injury experience through analysis of a nationally representative hospital emergency department sample helps inform senior injury prevention and fitness goals. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was performed using 2010 to 2019 data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission’s (CPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). Tennis was selected for comparison purposes because of the similarity of play, occasional competition for the same court space, and because many seniors play both sports. Non-fatal pickleball and tennis-related cases were identified, examined, recoded, and separated by injury versus non-injury conditions. Since over 85% of the pickleball injury-related cases were to players ≥60 years of age, we mostly focused on this older age group. Analyses consisted of descriptive statistics, injury frequency, type and trends over time, and comparative measures of risk. Results Among players ≥60 years of age, non-injuries (i.e., cardiovascular events) accounted for 11.1 and 21.5% of the pickleball and tennis-related cases, respectively. With non-injuries removed for seniors (≥60 years), the NEISS contained a weighted total of 28,984 pickleball injuries (95% confidence interval [CI] = 19,463–43,163) and 58,836 tennis injuries (95% CI = 44,861-77,164). Pickleball-related injuries grew rapidly over the study period, and by 2018 the annual number of senior pickleball injuries reached parity with senior tennis-related injuries. Pickleball-related Slip/Trip/Fall/Dive injury mechanisms predominated (63.3, 95% CI = 57.7–69.5%). The leading pickleball-related diagnoses were strains/sprains (33.2, 95% CI = 27.8–39.5%), fractures (28.1, 95% CI = 24.3–32.4%) and contusions (10.6, 95% CI = 8.0–14.1%). Senior males were three-and-a-half times more likely than females to suffer a pickleball-related strain or sprain (Odds Ratio [OR] 3.5, 95% CI = 2.2–5.6) whereas women were over three-and-a-half times more likely to suffer a fracture (OR 3.7, 95% CI = 2.3–5.7) compared to men and nine times more likely to suffer a wrist fracture (OR 9.3 95% CI = 3.6–23.9). Patterns of senior tennis and pickleball injuries were mostly similar. Conclusions NEISS is a valuable data source for describing the epidemiology of recreational injuries. However, careful case definitions are necessary when examining records involving older populations as non-injury conditions related to the activity/product codes of interest are frequent. As pickleball gains in popularity among active seniors, it is becoming an increasingly important cause of injury. Identifying and describing the most common types of injuries may can help inform prevention and safety measures.
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Background: Pickleball is a paddle sport that combines many of the elements of tennis, badminton, and ping-pong. It is reported to be one of the faster growing sports in the United States and is popular among older adults. There is limited published information on pickleball-related injuries. Objective: The objective of this study was to describe pickleball-related injuries treated in U.S. emergency departments (EDs). Methods: An analysis was performed of pickleball-related injuries using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission during 2001-2017. Results: A total of 300 pickleball-related injuries were identified, resulting in a national estimate of 19,012 injuries. The annual estimated number of injuries increased during 2013-2017. Patients 50 years or older accounted for 90.9% of the patients; 50.4% were male. The injury occurred at a sports or recreational facility in 74.3% of the cases. The most common injuries were strain or sprain (28.7%) and fracture (27.7%). The affected body part was the lower extremity in 32.0% of the cases and upper extremity in 25.4%. The patient was treated or evaluated and released from the ED in 88.0% of the cases. Conclusions: Based on NEISS data, pickleball-related injuries have been increasing in recent years. Although pickleball-related injuries have many similarities with those associated with other racquet sports, there were various differences (e.g., increasing trend and older patient age) that may need to be considered for the prevention and management of injuries related to the sport.
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For older adults, participating in leisure activities has psychosocial benefits, increases social interactions, and promotes well-being. Among various leisure activities, pickleball is an activity that fosters positive social interaction and health benefits in older adults. Pickleball is regarded as one of the fastest growing sports in the USA, and it is reported to be popular among people of all ages, especially among older adults. The purpose of this study was to gather demographic details of older pickleball participants and elucidate the psychosocial benefits of playing the sport, such as life satisfaction, optimism, and social integration. To this end, we gathered information from 153 older adults who competed in pickleball tournaments. Multivariate analysis of variance and Hotelling’s T² test were used to compare the differences that emerged in experiential factors such as life satisfaction, optimism, and social integration among the different demographic characteristics. The results showed that life satisfaction was significantly different among the following three age groups: 50–59 years, 60–69 years, and ≥70 years. Results of Hotelling’s T² test showed a significant difference in social integration between male and female participants. The test also revealed a significant difference in terms of life satisfaction between retired and employed participants. The results suggest that playing pickleball can be an enriching leisure activity for retirees and may help them cope with the transition that retirement typically entails.
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Pickleball has recently emerged as the fastest growing sport in the U.S . Pickleball is a paddle sport that combines elements of tennis, badminton, and table tennis, and played on a badminton-sized court with a perforated plastic ball. Despite the increasing popularity among older adults, no previous research has examined the behavior of older adults in pickleball settings. This study explored the characteristics of pickleball participants, including lifestyles and psychosocial benefits. The study participants were 153 older adults who competed in pickleball tournaments in a Southern and a Southeastern state in the U.S. Hotelling’s T² test and MANOVA were employed to determine differences in age (50–59, 60–69, and 70+ years), gender, occupational and marital status in outcome variables (i.e., life satisfaction, optimism, social integration). The results showed a significant difference among the age groups, gender, and occupational status on the outcome variables. To be specific, participants in the oldest group (70+) reported significantly higher life satisfaction than the 50–59 years age group. In addition, female participants scored significantly higher on social integration. With regard to employment status, retired participants scored significantly higher on life satisfaction than the employed participants. Our findings suggest that playing pickleball is: (1) suitable for older women who feel lonely or in need of extended friendships through exercise, and (2) recommended for older adults who are searching for a productive and fruitful retirement. Taken together, this initial empirical study showed that playing pickleball can be a key leisure pursuit that contributes to well-being of older adults.
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