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Linkages between course status, perceived course value, and students’ preference for traditional versus non-traditional learning environments

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Abstract

This study assessed undergraduate and graduate students' preferences for course delivery via traditional classroom, hybrid, or wholly online learning format as influenced by the status of the course as a prerequisite, elective, or core offering and perceptions of its utility and importance. Students also were asked to justify their choice of learning format. Overall, students preferred traditional classes across all course statuses and justified their choices by citing them as engaging and interactive. Across all students, perceptions of the usefulness and importance of each course status did not significantly influence their selection of a specific learning environment. Collectively, these findings have ramifications for understanding factors that impact students’ responses to online learning environments.

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... In online learning environments, research shows the importance of consistent connection amongst students and between students and their instructor (Clayton, Blumberg, & Anthony, 2018;Ali, Hodson-Carlton, & Ryan, 2004). These connections can be more challenging to model and facilitate in an online learning environment. ...
... Furthermore, because we know the importance of developing connections amongst students and their instructor (Clayton, Blumberg, & Anthony, 2018;Ali, Hodson-Carlton, & Ryan, 2004), researchers can study teacher candidates' experiences in the ways instructors built relationships during the pandemic. Presently, little is known about students' preferences related to learning formats when given opportunities to choose among online, hybrid, and face-to-face courses (Clayton, Blumberg, & Anthony, 2018). ...
... Furthermore, because we know the importance of developing connections amongst students and their instructor (Clayton, Blumberg, & Anthony, 2018;Ali, Hodson-Carlton, & Ryan, 2004), researchers can study teacher candidates' experiences in the ways instructors built relationships during the pandemic. Presently, little is known about students' preferences related to learning formats when given opportunities to choose among online, hybrid, and face-to-face courses (Clayton, Blumberg, & Anthony, 2018). Therefore, researchers could also explore the relationship between how teacher educators nurtured connections and how that impacted the preferences and perceptions of online learning. ...
Chapter
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The COVID-19 pandemic triggered a rapid transition to online instruction, both for universities and K12 schools. This transition exposed the limitations of teacher to student engagement using video conferencing technology for synchronous instruction. Effective use of formative assessment, including informal assessment, is beneficial for learners, both in K12 and postsecondary contexts, but requires adaptation for online instruction. This chapter illuminates the challenges of conducting informal assessment in synchronous online courses using Dewey and Bentley’s (1949) conception of transaction, or communication as mutually constituted, goal-oriented action.It argues that instructors of pre-service teachers should reestablish as much transactional engagement as possible, while using the affordances of the video conferencing technology to supplement where necessary.
... In parallel with wide spreading of internet and also electronic devices enabling access to the internet, e-learning has been widely used particularly in higher education all over the world (Cidral et al. 2018;Freeze et al. 2010;Liaw et al. 2007;Zhang and Nunamaker 2003). Hence, there has been a significant transition from traditional classrooms to e-learning systems at universities' undergraduate and graduate programs (Allen and Seaman 2016;Clayton et al. 2018;McGill and Klobas 2009). ...
... E-learning systems enable learning at anywhere and anytime and provide access to information remotely. Additionally, its key feature of providing flexible and personalized learning to learners makes e-learning a highly preferred learning platform among students Bhuasiri et al. 2012;Chiu and Wang 2008;Clayton et al. 2010Clayton et al. , 2018Marshall et al. 2012;Peña-Ayala et al. 2014;Viberg and Grönlund 2013). Scholars have previously developed various theories including Davis (1989)'s the technology acceptance model, the theory of reasoned action and the theory of planned behaviour (Fishbein and Ajzen 1975) in order to understand and explain the antecedent factors of the information systems success. ...
Article
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This study aims to examine an e-learning system based on student perceptions through employing the Information Systems Success Model (IS Success Model). The study is built on the assumption that system quality and information quality affect the system use and user satisfaction and in turn system success. The survey data was collected from 144 students who use an e-learning system at a public university in Rome, Italy. The data was subject to PLS path-modeling analysis via Smart PLS 3.0. The empirical results, which are drawn from the students’ self-reported perceptional evaluations about the e-learning system confirm that whereas system quality has significant impact on both system usage and user satisfaction, information quality has significant impact only on user satisfaction. Moreover, the author also found that both user satisfaction and system usage have positive and significant impacts on system success.
... Engagement in this study refers to the usage of online class tools such as video lectures, videoconferencing, and group discussions. Clayton et al. (2018) [46] found that engagement and interaction are key factors that impact students' responses to online learning environments. Van Wart et al. (2020) [42] claimed that good online classes should properly engage students and provide strong learner-to-leaner interactions, as the most demanding learners expect more interactions in the learning process with the instructor and other students. ...
... Engagement in this study refers to the usage of online class tools such as video lectures, videoconferencing, and group discussions. Clayton et al. (2018) [46] found that engagement and interaction are key factors that impact students' responses to online learning environments. Van Wart et al. (2020) [42] claimed that good online classes should properly engage students and provide strong learner-to-leaner interactions, as the most demanding learners expect more interactions in the learning process with the instructor and other students. ...
Article
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This study utilized the Kano model to practically identify the key attributes of online service quality of e-learning education companies. Along with a review of theoretical sources related to service quality, this paper placed similar attributes into the same cluster and finalized four constructs, i.e., reliability, responsiveness, competence, and engagement. In addition, consumer perception plays a mediating role in the relationship between online service quality and online purchase intention, while online customer referral is taken as a moderator indirectly influencing customer perceptions because people like to share their purchasing and usage experiences online. Subsequently, a structured questionnaire was designed and survey data were collected from 418 respondents through various social media. Hypotheses were tested using the structural equation modeling (SEM) and SPSS Process Model 4 and 7. The outcomes show (1) consumer perception significantly mediates the relationship between online service quality and online purchase intention, and (2) online customer referral has a profound effect on consumer perception, indicating that it indirectly affects purchase intention. Online customer referral, therefore, may help e-learning education companies to improve service quality with key features that better positions them to target online learners.
... That is, the instructor uses interactive online class tools-video lectures, videoconferencing, and small group discussions-well. It is often included in concepts such as instructional quality (Artino, 2010;Asoodar et al., 2016;Mohammadi, 2015;Otter et al., 2013;Paechter et al., 2010) or engagement (Clayton, Blumberg, & Anthony, 2018). While individual methods have been investigated (e.g. ...
... Some situational variations and student preferences can be captured by paying attention to disciplinary differences (Arbaugh, 2005;Macon, 2011). Motivation levels of students have been reported to be significant in completion and achievement, with better students doing as well across face-to-face and online modes, and weaker students having greater completion and achievement challenges (Clayton et al., 2018;Lu & Lemonde, 2013). ...
Article
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This article reports on a large-scale ( n = 987), exploratory factor analysis study incorporating various concepts identified in the literature as critical success factors for online learning from the students’ perspective, and then determines their hierarchical significance. Seven factors--Basic Online Modality, Instructional Support, Teaching Presence, Cognitive Presence, Online Social Comfort, Online Interactive Modality, and Social Presence--were identified as significant and reliable. Regression analysis indicates the minimal factors for enrollment in future classes—when students consider convenience and scheduling—were Basic Online Modality, Cognitive Presence, and Online Social Comfort. Students who accepted or embraced online courses on their own merits wanted a minimum of Basic Online Modality, Teaching Presence, Cognitive Presence, Online Social Comfort, and Social Presence. Students, who preferred face-to-face classes and demanded a comparable experience, valued Online Interactive Modality and Instructional Support more highly. Recommendations for online course design, policy, and future research are provided.
... Perceived value refers to how important, interesting, and enjoyable students perceive an activity, as well as a subject or terminology (Mills and Moulton, 2017), so superficial learning strategies occur when students' perceived value of the curriculum is low (Floyd et al., 2009), and students' choice of learning environment may be influenced by students' perceptions of learning comfort (Clayton et al., 2018). Students' choice of learning environment may be influenced by the perceived value of the curriculum in terms of comfort (Clayton et al., 2018). ...
... Perceived value refers to how important, interesting, and enjoyable students perceive an activity, as well as a subject or terminology (Mills and Moulton, 2017), so superficial learning strategies occur when students' perceived value of the curriculum is low (Floyd et al., 2009), and students' choice of learning environment may be influenced by students' perceptions of learning comfort (Clayton et al., 2018). Students' choice of learning environment may be influenced by the perceived value of the curriculum in terms of comfort (Clayton et al., 2018). Therefore, it is considered necessary to take into account students' perceived value when modifying the teaching process, since an increase in perceived value will increase students' propensity to continue learning (Dlačić et al., 2014). ...
Article
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Among the many teaching methods, inquiry-based teaching is considered to be an effective way for students to learn and solve problems on their own. However, most of the research related to inquiry-based teaching and learning has concentrated mainly on K-12 education, while few to no studies have focused on the application of inquirybased teaching and learning in project design courses at university level. Therefore, in order to expand the understanding of the application effect of inquiry-based teaching at university level, this study adopted the quasi-experimental design method, and through the purposive sampling method, 20 students from the Department of Fashion Design at a University of Science and Technology were invited to participate in this study. During the 9-month period, teaching experiments were carried out using two inquiry models, QC/ADEAC and QD/ODEAC. First, when participants were thinking of a creative topic, they followed the process: Question (Q), Collection/Analysis (C/A), Discussion (D), Explanation (E), Amendment (A), and Confirmation (C) in the course. During the production process, the participants were allowed to improve on their work through the process of Question (Q), Doing/Observation (D/O), Discussion (D), Explanation (E), Amendment (A), and Confirmation (C). The teacher became a true guide, so that the participants could explore and work out how to improve their designs through independent inquiry and practice. In this study, questionnaires were administered to participants at five important stages of the design project: “theme development,” “color development,” “first Work,” “second Work,” and “third Work.” The results of the five surveys showed that the participants’ curriculum interest, curriculum value perception, and curriculum confidence in the inquiry program all increased.
... Computer based technologies, such as internet, web-based education, social networks, mobile instruments, videos and computer games, are widely integrated in young people's modern daily lives and have already been integrated into higher education in many aspects, offering both formal and informal education, as well as on-campus and distancelearning opportunities [13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20]. Students tend to adapt digital tools and devices and use them as interactive learning environments in order to interact and collaborate with their classmates according to social and academic considerations, and to develop self-confidence combined with professional skills [6,15,18,20]. ...
Article
The present study suggests an approach to teaching a novel additive manufacturing (AM) course for engineering students at the graduate level, developed in 2015 and taught currently at Afeka Academic College of Engineering. The proposed course is dedicated to the fundamentals, methods, materials, standards and industrial applications of AM, and involves introduction lectures, special topic lectures organized with industry and academic experts, laboratory training and final engineering projects. For this purpose, a pedagogical project-based learning (PBL) model was developed with the main goal of using the AM techniques for innovation projects dealing with devices for people with disabilities. Three selected study cases of high level student projects designed, printed and presented during the 2017–2018 course are reviewed herein. The first project proposed by the students was to develop and build an opener for medicine containers; the second was to design and build a device for pouring liquids for people with Parkinson's disease; and the third was to design and construct a 3D puzzle for blind or visually impaired people. All three projects were designed with a computer-aided design program and then printed using the ABS material. Quality control (three-point bending tests and light microscopy) was routinely conducted on standard specimens printed on the same tray with the components. Once the mean maximal flexural stress obtained from the standard specimens exceeded the acceptance values, the parts were approved and assembled, and the mechanical assemblage was examined. The learning process included two iteration steps that were executed to improve and optimize the structural design. The final 3D printed objects, the students’ presentations, their experience, as reflected in their final reports, and their personal written evaluations, lead to the conclusion that the projects served as useful learning experience for engineering education. Hence, it is suggested that modern mechanical engineering education programs should adopt a multidisciplinary PBL approach when developing future AM courses in order to encourage students’ creativity, learning motivation and engagement.
... Another recurring theme was the soft skills and communication skills the students learn through the classroom experience which would not have been experienced during an online learning experience. This preference of graduates for traditional classroom teaching confirms some recent research by Clayton, Blumberg, and Anthony (2018) who found that graduate and undergraduate students justified their preference for traditional environments by citing the enhanced opportunity for engagement with classmates and instructors. Convenience was the main theme for the students in the group preferring online learning as they could study around their lifestyles. ...
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Word Count: 4396 Word limits must not be exceeded by more than 10% either way (above or below the limit stipulated). You should include all words from the start of the title of the assignment through to, but not including, the references and appendices. Appendices, while not counted, should be used to illustrate, rather than provide full details of transcripts, for example. Words within tables must be included in your word count. The following are not included in the word count and should be put before the title of the assignment: Table of Contents-Acknowledgements-How you addressed the feedback-Self-assessment criteria I grant permission for the programme tutors to make my assignment available to participants in subsequent cohorts: Yes ☒ No ☐ By signing or submitting this cover sheet you declare: • that your work has been done with the assignment specification and grade indicators in mind • that it is your own work and has not been submitted in substantially the same form towards the award of a degree or other qualification, that it has not been written or composed by any other person, and that all sources have been appropriately referenced and acknowledged. • that all sentences or passages quoted in this paper from other people's work (with or without trivial changes) have been placed within quotation marks, and are specifically acknowledged by reference to author, work and page. • I understand that plagiarism-the unacknowledged use of such passages will be considered grounds for failure in this paper or assignment, and, if serious, in the qualification as a whole. In the case of electronically submitted work, I also consent to this work being stored electronically and copied for assessment purposes. This includes the department's use of plagiarism detection systems in order to check the integrity of assessed work. Abstract The author presents a case study focusing on a small group of international MBA students at Birmingham City University and investigates whether their cultural identity impacts on their perceptions of online learning. The research concluded, contrary to previous research that although ethnicity is a part of the international student's identity it does not influence their perception of online learning. The findings show that to meet the needs and expectations of international students in 2020 and beyond, UK universities need to deliver online learning that has regular feedback and 24/7 student access to online support. This research will be of interest to UK business schools and academics specialising in blended learning. cultural Identity, diversity, blended learning, online learning, international students
... Enabled by technological developments, new suppliers have emerged and social media use has been increasingly integrated in organizational landscapes [3]. Consequently, in past decades, traditional face-to-face classroom learning has gradually been replaced by technology-based learning [4]. For example, LinkedIn, the world's largest professional online network, with over 740+ million users in more than 200 countries and increase our insight into the diversity of meanings ascribed to careers in other economic, cultural and institutional contexts across the globe [24]. ...
Article
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This longitudinal, quantitative study contributes to the debate on technology-based professional development by examining the extent to which a learning (LinkedIn) intervention in a university setting affects an individual’s social media use for professional development, and the extent to which this relates to self-reported employability. In addition, we investigated how this relationship is moderated by an individual’s motivation to communicate through social media (LinkedIn). Based on social capital theory and the conservation of resources theory, we developed a set of hypotheses that were tested based on longitudinal data collected from university employees (N = 101) in middle- and high-level jobs. First, in line with our expectations, social media use for professional development was significantly higher after the learning intervention than before. Second, partially in line with our expectations, social media use for professional development was positively related with the employability dimension anticipation and optimization. Third, contrary to our expectations, motivation to communicate through social media (LinkedIn) did not have a moderating role in this relationship. We concluded that the learning intervention has the potential to foster social media use for professional development, and in turn, can contribute to individuals’ human capital in terms of their employability. Hence, the intervention that forms the core of this empirical research can be a sustainable and promising human resource management (HRM) practice that fits the human capital agenda.
... Peneliti [3] membuat penelitian mengenai dua jenis pembelajaran yaitu tradisional dan non tradisional. Dalam prosesnya, mahasiswa diminta untuk memberikan pilihannya mengenai beberapa macam proses belajar yaitu kelas tradisional, hybrid, dan pembelajaran online sepenuhnya berdasarka beberapa parameter seperti kebergunaan dan kepentingannya. ...
Article
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Comparison of Student Experiences-Preferences in Online vs Face to Face Learning. Technology is increasingly developing, especially after the world has been hit by the COVID-19 virus pandemic. In the education sector, the learning process was carried out online, whereas before the pandemic it was carried out face to face. Of the two types of learning, there are often differences of opinion between students about which learning is better and more flexible. Based on this, this research is entitled Comparison of Students' Experience and Preferences on Online vs Face to Face Learning. This study uses a methodology, namely pre-field, field work, and data analysis. Data collection through interviews. Miles and Huberman's model is used for data reduction, data presentation, and conclusion drawing applied in data analysis. The results showed that student preferences for face to face learning were more than online learning, which was 75%, while the comparison of experiences felt by students was> 50% who chose face to face learning.Keywords: Online, Face to Face, Experience, PreferenceAbstrak.Teknologi semakin berkembang, terutama setelah dunia dilanda oleh pandemi virus COVID-19. Di bidang pendidikan, proses pembelajaran dilakukan secara online sedangkan sebelum pandemi dilakukan secara face to face. Dari kedua jenis pembelajaran tersebut, sering terdapat beda pendapat antar mahasiswa mengenai mana pembelajaran yang lebih baik dan fleksibel. Berdasarkan hal tersebut, penelitian ini berjudul Perbandingan Pengalaman dan Preferensi Mahasiswa terhadap Pembelajaran Online vs Face to face. Penelitian ini menggunakan metodologi yaitu pra lapangan, pekerjaan lapangan, dan analisis data. Pengumpulan data melalui wawancara. Model Miles dan Huberman digunakan untuk reduksi data, penyajian data, dan penarikan kesimpulan diterapkan dalam analisis data. Hasil penelitian menjunjukkan preferensi mahasiswa terhadap pembelajaran face to face lebih banyak daripada pembelajaran online, yaitu sebanyak 75% sedangkan perbandingan pengalaman yang dirasakan oleh mahasiswa adalah sebanyak > 50% yang memilih pembelajaran secara face to face.Kata Kunci: Online, Face to Face, Pengalaman, Preferensi
... Online learning platforms can now be used as the sole provider of learning materials, or it can be combined with traditional face-to-face methods [4]. E-learning offers the notable features of personalized and flexible educational environments [5]. It has become essential for universities, primary schools, governments, and other organizations that require education and training services [6], [7]. ...
Article
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The DeLone and McLean (D&M) information systems (IS) success model seeks to provide a comprehensive understanding of IS success by identifying and explaining the relationships among their most critical dimensions of success. Many studies have offered important insights into this model. Nevertheless, regarding the e-learning body of knowledge, D&M research remains to be systematically reviewed comprehensively. E-learning refers to the use of information technology to disseminate knowledge for education and training. With today’s e-learning boom necessitated for the most part by COVID-19, its adoption has become increasingly mandatory. Thus, a systematic review should help focus and accelerate future research. This study systematically reviews, compiles, analyzes, and synthesizes the D&M model studies in the e-learning context. This review adopts automatic and manual search methods to collect related studies from 2010 to 2020. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 92 primary studies are identified. The findings show that most of reviewed studies were conducted in the education field. The success category was the most highly investigated area from among the selected studies. Most studies developed a hybrid/extended model. Additionally, this study also identified gaps in the literature and recommends seven potential future areas requiring further investigation, such as conducting studies to examine the net benefits at the organizational level of analysis. To that end, the findings of this systematic review study provide an impactful contribution through offering a holistic review of the current state of D&M model studies in an e-learning context, providing an essential reference for scholars in this field.
... While universities are changing in their delivery of courses and units, criticism has been noted around the pedagogy that lecturers engage with, with arguments suggesting that there need to be more engaging and innovative teaching practices (Kopcha, Rieber, & Walker, 2016). Ironically, a possible reason to maintain the status quo is that students themselves possess a sentimental conception of lecturers, reporting a trend towards favoring traditional 'chalk and talk' lectures (Clayton et al., 2018;So, 2012). ...
Article
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While there is developing interest and value of the use of Virtual Teams to build collaboration, there is relatively little research into the benefits of adopting the Virtual Teams approach to address student learning in online university environments. Adoption of pedagogies to address the inability for students to meet face to face because of COVID-19 indicates the particular relevance for introducing an approach such as Virtual Teams. This article will show the results of a study using an online survey to investigate student perceptions of a course re-structure, designed to meet student needs in the 21st-century learning environment. Results indicated that all course redesign components were helpful as learning tools and tasks reflecting real-life scenarios were the most useful for learning outcomes. The implications for future use of Virtual Teams in online university courses in a post-COVID-19 world are also presented.
... To find the most effective teaching and learning approach for the achievement of optimal students' satisfaction and learning outcome, many pedagogical concepts have been employed by researchers and practitioners in higher education. Among these pedagogical concepts adopted or tested are blended learning approach (Garrison and Kanuka, 2004;Picciano, 2009;Khodeir, 2018;Kaur, 2013;Boelens, et al., 2018), flipped learning approach (Awidi and Paynter, 2019;Kolb and Kolb, 2005;Hafidi and Mahnane, 2018;Cavanagh, 2011;Soliman, 2016;Lin, 2018;Lombardini et al., 2018), traditional learning approach (Byers et al., 2018;Tortorella and Cauchick-Miguel, 2018;Clayton et al., 2018), playful learning approach Resnick, 2006;Hyvönen and Marjaana, 2005). Despite the large number of studies conducted on teaching pedagogies, scholars such as Khodeir (2018) have recommended for further research on pedagogies to examine their impact on students' satisfaction or the process of their implantation among diverse cross-sections of students. ...
Article
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Although the pedagogy of blended learning in higher education has been well-accepted since its inception in 2000 particularly due to the incessant technological innovations, its impact on students' experience has been reliant on various factors. This includes cultural diversity and background, technical abilities, level of organisational support, language difficulties, educational background, learning environment, instructional design, and many others. In this study, the effectiveness of the blended learning approach has been practically reassessed among the diverse cohorts of international students at Birmingham City University. The motivation for the selection of this sample was to enable the inclusion of diversity as one of the focal points of the study. Data was collected from the action research undertaken and analysed based on a survey research method. This was to test the significance of the hypotheses formulated and find answers to the research questions that were designed to portray the central intent of the study. Based on the action research, two-cycle model was adopted to reassess the effectiveness of blended learning in comparison to the traditional learning approach. In the first cycle, the effectiveness of traditional learning approach was tested. The mixed responses received had justified the implementation of the second cycle of the action research. In the second cycle, the blended learning approach was adopted in the class session and its effectiveness tested by administering questionnaires to the students under study. Furthermore, multiple regressions were employed using unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) to test the significance of each variable collected from the survey on the students' learning experience and engagement. Our results have suggested that students' engagement is determined by positive learning experience without any bias to traditional or blended learning approach. Students' age group was found to be relevant in the determination of behavioural intention, social influence, effort expectancy, performance expectancy and facilitating conditions towards the effective use of technology and blended learning. Students' gender was an irrelevant factor in the success of blended learning approach.
... The massive spread of the Internet and electronic devices facilitating access to the Internet have contributed substantially to the wide use of e-learning in higher education around the globe (Cidral et al., 2018). Thus, a significant shift from conventional (traditional) learning to e-learning at HEIs and in both undergraduate and graduate programs has taken place (Clayton et al., 2018). Kurt (2019Kurt ( , p. 1174 pointed out that e-learning can be described as any type of learning, teaching or educational activity, which is facilitated by online networks based on computer and internet technologies. ...
Article
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The key objective of this study was to reveal the key factors that impact university students’ continued usage intentions with respect to Learning Management Systems (LMSs). Given the context-dependent nature of e-learning, the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) model was applied and extended with constructs principally related to LMSs. The newly added constructs include learning tradition, self-directed learning, and e-learning self-efficacy. The extended model, which measures continued usage intentions with respect to LMSs, was validated with empirical data collected via an online survey questionnaire completed by a sample of 590 higher education students in three private universities in Jordan. PLS-SEM- “Partial least squares structural equation modelling” was employed to examine the various hypotheses introduced in the model. The results demonstrated that: (1) performance expectancy, e-learning self-efficacy, effort expectancy, facilitating conditions, and social influence have a direct positive influence on continued usage intentions, (2) effort expectancy has a direct positive effect on performance expectancy, (3) performance expectancy partially mediates the relationship between effort expectancy and continued usage intentions, and (4) self-directed learning and learning tradition have direct negative effects on continued usage intentions. The outcomes of this study have valuable theoretical and practical implications for researchers, higher education institutions (HEIs), and developers of LMSs.
... Even prior to pandemic times, students reported mixed attitudes toward online instruction, with American students showing a preference for traditional face-to-face courses in comparison to their online counterparts [5][6][7] . Student perceptions of the online learning environment indicate difficulty with technology, time constraints, the lack of community, and the inconsistent and unclear learning objectives as significant challenges facing students enrolled in online courses 8 . ...
Conference Paper
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This complete research paper explores first year engineering (FYE) students' advice for attaining success in online learning. In the spring semester of 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic thrust higher education students from their traditional classroom settings into online learning platforms. Students typically seek online learning opportunities due to the flexibility and convenience of the format, allowing balance between work and family life with school responsibilities. This emergency shift to online courses presented a unique opportunity to gain insight in the attitudes of unwilling online learners and identifies these students as ample sources of advice for future online learners. At the conclusion of the spring 2020 semester, 233 first-year engineering students from a public technical university were asked to provide advice for incoming engineering students completing courses in the online environment. Advice from 67 student teams was collected through an in-class assignment. Student responses were anonymized and coded using analytic induction and convergent coding methods within a grounded theory framework. An initial codebook was developed using codes from research previously conducted by the authors, with additional codes being added as a consensus in response coding was reached amongst researchers. Results indicated that time management was the top concern for online students, followed by readiness to learn online, which included managing distractions to online learning and learning in dedicated spaces. Self-care also emerged as a more significant concern for online first year engineering students than in person first year engineering students, including sleep hygiene, study/screen breaks, staying hydrated, getting dressed and exercising, all relevant issues for those working and learning at home during the COVID-19 pandemic. In response to these results, we recommend that instructors of introductory online courses integrate materials about time management, distraction management, and self-care into their classes. Introduction During the spring semester of 2020, many universities were forced to transition to online learning in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. University students were thrust into online courses, many over their scheduled spring break, with little training on how to navigate online courses or succeed in online learning. Traditionally, students seek online learning opportunities due to time and location restrictions, which may be imposed by family obligations or work responsibilities 1-4. The flexibility and convenience of the online format appeals not only to students but also to universities, which sometimes offer online courses to accommodate increased course demand and lack of classroom capacity 1,2. Universities have never been faced with a situation in which an emergency shift to prolonged online learning was necessary at a global scale. As a result, the transition to online learning in response to COVID-19 has presented a unique opportunity to gain insight into online instruction from a cohort of students unwillingly thrust into online courses. This paper presents the advice forced online engineering students have for future online learners.
... Even prior to pandemic times, students reported mixed attitudes toward online instruction, with American students showing a preference for traditional face-to-face courses in comparison to their online counterparts [5][6][7] . Student perceptions of the online learning environment indicate difficulty with technology, time constraints, the lack of community, and the inconsistent and unclear learning objectives as significant challenges facing students enrolled in online courses 8 . ...
Article
This complete research paper explores first year engineering (FYE) students’ advice for attaining success in online learning. In the spring semester of 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic thrust higher education students from their traditional classroom settings into online learning platforms. Students typically seek online learning opportunities due to the flexibility and convenience of the format, allowing balance between work and family life with school responsibilities. This emergency shift to online courses presented a unique opportunity to gain insight in the attitudes of unwilling online learners and identifies these students as ample sources of advice for future online learners. At the conclusion of the spring 2020 semester, 233 first-year engineering students from a public technical university were asked to provide advice for incoming engineering students completing courses in the online environment. Advice from 67 student teams was collected through an in-class assignment. Student responses were anonymized and coded using analytic induction and convergent coding methods within a grounded theory framework. An initial codebook was developed using codes from research previously conducted by the authors, with additional codes being added as a consensus in response coding was reached amongst researchers. Results indicated that time management was the top concern for online students, followed by readiness to learn online, which included managing distractions to online learning and learning in dedicated spaces. Self-care also emerged as a more significant concern for online first year engineering students than in person first year engineering students, including sleep hygiene, study/screen breaks, staying hydrated, getting dressed and exercising, all relevant issues for those working and learning at home during the COVID-19 pandemic. In response to these results, we recommend that instructors of introductory online courses integrate materials about time management, distraction management, and self-care into their classes.
... E-learning is gaining popularity and is widely used in today's modern education. It has enabled students to learn more flexibly, achieving high educational achievement and satisfaction through efficient use of their time and digital devices [6]. Earlier studies indicate that e-learning reduces time and space constraints for students, increasing educational development [7], [8]. ...
... There are contrasting results in the adoption of traditional and online learning modes in different studies. For instance, Clayton et al. (2018) studied the preferences for course delivery among 464 university students and found that all of them preferred traditional classes as they viewed traditional learning method more engaging and interactive than hybrid or online classes. Yusnilita (2020) found that 80% of students felt online learning interesting and 90% of them regarded online learning practical. ...
Article
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The adoption of online learning approach in education is becoming more popular around the world to overcome the time and spatial barriers of traditional face-to-face learning. The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected the normality of learning and avoiding face-to-face activities is one tactic to minimise the spread of COVID-19. This study investigated the perception of online learning from students’ and teachers’ perspectives compared to traditional face-to-face learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. Ten focus group interviews were conducted, nine of which involved fifty-five students, while the remaining one involved eight full-time teachers. All informants were recruited from two Hong Kong tertiary educational institutions: the Hong Kong Community College, and the School of Professional Education and Executive Development of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. The Community of Inquiry model and Pedagogy-driven, Learner-Centred, Objective-Oriented and Technology-Enable model were adopted as a framework to analyse students’ and teachers’ perceptions of social presence, teaching presence, and cognitive presence. Qualitative content analysis indicated that teacher-student and student–student interactions were the biggest challenge in online learning, and this affected the acquisition and application of knowledge in terms of cognitive presence. Other factors such as personality, learning environment, and technical skills affected the perception of both online and face-to-face learning.
... In the field of learning sciences, a wealth of research has shown that students' SE and their perceived value of the online learning environment constitute critical factors driving students' academic success (Bandura, 1993;Clayton et al., 2018;Jones & Jones, 2005;Moore & Wang, 2021;Wei & Chou, 2020). Yet, as far as we know, there is hardly any study that has investigated students' beliefs regarding both programming SE and the intrinsic value of online learning environments for programming education. ...
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Several studies have explored the factors that influence self-efficacy as well as its contribution to academic development in online learning environments in recent years. However, little research has investigated the effect of a web-based learning environment on enhancing students’ beliefs about self-efficacy for learning. This is especially noticeable in the field of online distributed programming. We need to design online learning environments for programming education that foster both students’ self-efficacy for programming learning and the added value that students perceive of the tool as a successful learning environment. To that end, we conducted a quantitative analysis to collect and analyze data of students using an online Distributed Systems Laboratory (DSLab) in an authentic, long-term online educational experience. The results indicate that (1) our distributed programming learning tool provides an environment that increases students’ belief of programming self-efficacy; (2) the students’ experience with the tool strengthens their belief in the intrinsic value of the tool; however (3) the relationship between students’ belief in the tool intrinsic value and their self-efficacy is inconclusive. This study provides relevant implications for online distributed (or general) programming course teachers who seek to increase students’ engagement, learning and performance in this field.
... Zur Auswahl einer geeigneten sozialen Lernplattform wurden exemplarische Kriterien zur Auswahl von Lernumgebungen herangezogen. Diese sind die Bereitstellung von Möglichkeiten zur Interaktion und für teilnehmerspezifische Instruktionen, die Vertrautheit mit der Lernumgebung sowie die Passung zum eigenen Lebensstil(Clayton et al., 2018). Darüber hinaus wurden potenzielle Anforderungen der Teilnehmenden bzw. ...
Chapter
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... These students' satisfaction expectations lead to various challenges for instructors, such as mastering the new techniques while maintaining the educational integrity and providing a quality online learning mode of delivery (Brinkely-Etzkorn, 2018). Amongst elements identified in students' satisfaction with this online learning are student connections, active learning process between instructors and peers, practical education, learner independence, and technology advancement (Clayton et al. 2018). ...
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The current pandemic has triggered emergency remote teaching (ERT) to be implemented by higher education institutions globally. This unprecedented circumstance caused serious dissonance between students' learning experience and overall satisfaction. Hence, this research aims to determine the factors influencing their satisfaction with ERT implemented by higher learning institutions in Penang, especially among undergraduate students. Based on the underpinning unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT), the four vital influencing factors identified in this study include the usefulness of online materials, network stability, the usability of e-learning platforms, and peer interactions. A total of 504 responses were analyzed using SPSS software. Results indicate that the use of online materials and the usability of e-learning platforms were critical determinants of satisfaction with ERT among undergraduate students. At the same time, internet stability and peer interactions have no significant influence. This current study concludes with relevant implications and recommendations for higher learning institutions to consider to thrive in this changing education landscape.
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This study aims to use PLS-SEM to investigate the influence of smart instant feedback with goal setting and task strategies functions on learners’ germane cognitive load and extraneous cognitive load in the contexts of online courses. Thirty-five graduate students were recruited to participate in our experiment and complete four units of digital learning materials and questionnaires. Results show that task strategies have significant mediation effects between behavioral engagement and extraneous cognitive load and between cognitive engagement and extraneous cognitive load. Finally, according to the research findings, we provided some suggestions to online learners, instructors, and researchers whose interests are online course design. Inappropriate use of task strategies such as worked examples results in increased extraneous cognitive load.
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This study aims to apply PLS-SEM to explore whether online learners’ germane cognitive load and extraneous cognitive load are influenced by the use of a smart instant feedback system based on goal setting and task strategies design in online courses. Participants of this study consisted of 35 graduate students who were asked to complete four units of digital learning materials and questionnaires as part of the experiment. Results show that goal setting has a significant mediation effect between behavioral engagement and germane cognitive load; task strategies have a significant mediation effect between behavioral engagement and extraneous cognitive load; and task strategies also have a significant mediation effect between cognitive engagement and extraneous cognitive load. Finally, recommendations are provided to instructors and researchers based on these results as a reference for future studies.
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Chapter
This chapter focuses on blended learning approaches, trends, research, and publication opportunities. It begins with a discussion about campus-based and fully-online approaches to blended learning. Research trends are then described from student, faculty, and administrative perspectives. Research opportunities and challenges are presented for each of these three categories. The chapter concludes with an overview of the resources, conferences, and publication venues that are available in the field of blended learning.
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Over the last few years, students' learning methods have changed considerably from traditional techniques to e-learning and m-learning. Indeed, mobile learning (m-learning) is a technology that has advanced quickly without creating any limitations on time and place, to deliver electronic learning (e-learning) with the use of personal electronics. Studies that emphasize the use of m-learning in educational institutions are surfacing. This study looks at the advanced techniques of m-learning and examines students' attitudes toward the use and implementation of m-learning techniques for the sustainability of learning. The results are based on a survey conducted with 253 students at various universities in terms of their attitudes toward and perceptions of m-learning techniques as a supplement to traditional learning methods. This study followed and checked the academic details of each student to ascertain the impact of m-learning techniques. The findings suggest that it is essential to design m-learning so that the material to be taught inside and outside the classroom is known.
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There are positive feedback loops between students’ grades and emotions. However, subjective appraisals, not grades, are theorized to trigger emotions. We extended previous research by comparing the effects of objective score and subjective appraisals of the score (i.e., satisfaction) on emotions. We used an ecologically-valid quasi-experimental design and found differences in how objective score compared to satisfaction impacted emotions. Main effects for score showed positive associations with hope, pride, relief, and negative associations with anxiety, anger, and shame. An interaction for satisfaction occurred such that students who were satisfied with their score had the same effect as objective score, but students who were unsatisfied with their score felt less hope, pride, relief, and more anger and shame. Implications for the control-value theory of emotions as well as for instructors are discussed.
Chapter
Institutions of higher education are facing many tough questions as to how best to address lower on-campus attendance and budgetary concerns. Many scholars believe the answer lies in distance education. This chapter begins with the description of online learning, online course philosophical approaches, and online course design models that have arisen in higher education in some part to the need to increase revenue. Next, the authors address student preferences and perceptions of online learning, specifically, adult learners and perceptions and preferences of online learning as they relate to teacher interactions/teaching loads/demands. Finally, they propose a solution to the identified key problems.
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