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Fourth Report of the Alaska Checklist Committee, 2013-2017

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The fourth report of the Alaska Checklist Committee outlines 22 species and two subspecies added to the Checklist of Alaska Birds during the five years 2013-2017, resulting in a net total of 521 species and 119 additional subspecies of birds recognized as occurring or having occurred naturally in Alaska through 2017.
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174 Western Birds 49:174–191, 2018; doi 10.21199/WB49.3.1
FOURTH REPORT OF THE ALASKA
CHECKLIST COMMITTEE, 2013–2017
DANIEL D. GIBSON, P.O. Box 155, Ester, Alaska 99725-0155; avesalaska@gmail.com
LUCAS H. DeCICCO, Biodiversity Institute and Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary
Biology, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045; lhdecicco@gmail.com
ROBERT E. GILL JR., 3014 Knik Avenue, Anchorage, Alaska 99517; rgill@usgs.gov
STEVEN C. HEINL, 2603 4th Avenue, Ketchikan, Alaska 99901;
stevencheinl@gmail.com
AARON J. LANG, 40208 Alpenglow Circle, Homer, Alaska 99603;
birdingak@gmail.com
THEODORE G. TOBISH JR., 2510 Foraker Drive, Anchorage, Alaska 99517;
tgtljo@gmail.com
JACK J. WITHROW, University of Alaska Museum, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-6960;
jjwithrow@alaska.edu
ABSTRACT: The fourth report of the Alaska Checklist Committee outlines 22
species and two subspecies added to the Checklist of Alaska Birds during the five years
2013–2017, resulting in a net total of 521 species and 119 additional subspecies of
birds recognized as occurring or having occurred naturally in Alaska through 2017.
During the period 2013–2017, 22 species and two subspecies were
added to the Checklist of Alaska Birds, resulting in a total of 521 species
and 119 additional subspecies recognized by the Alaska Checklist Committee
(AKCLC) at the beginning of 2018 as occurring or having occurred naturally
in Alaska. Organized in 2000, the committee comprises six voting members
(above) and a nonvoting secretary (Withrow). We post a new edition of the
Checklist of Alaska Birds early in each new year at the University of Alaska
Museum’s website, where the 24th edition (dated 1 January 2018) can be
found at <www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds/products/checklist/pdf>.
The current Checklist of Alaska Birds is founded on the “Inventory of the
species and subspecies of Alaska birds” (Gibson and Kessel 1997) and incor-
porates additions, deletions, status changes, taxonomic and nomenclatural
changes, etc., reflected in earlier AKCLC reports (Gibson et al. 2003, 2008,
2013), in the second edition of the “Inventory” (Gibson and Withrow 2015),
and on information we report here for the first time.
Volume 49, Number 3, 2018
175
Because preserved examples (archived voucher specimens) of avian spe-
cies and subspecies make available manifold data that can only be conjectured
from representations (photos, videos, etc.), we include here details of first
Alaska specimens of species or subspecies already on the Alaska list—ar-
chived specimens brought to our attention, re-evaluated, or obtained during
this period of coverage. For all taxa discussed here we include author, year
of publication, type locality {in braces}, and overview of breeding range.
Authorities for outlines of nesting range include Vaurie (1959, 1965), Ameri-
can Ornithologists’ Union (AOU 1998 and supplements through [Chesser
et al.] 2017), Dickinson and Remsen (2013), and Dickinson and Christidis
(2014). Subspecies in brackets are inferences based on characteristics of
plumage, phenology, and/or geographic range; subspecies not represented
by an archived Alaska specimen; and/or specimens that we are unable to
identify with certainty to subspecies. All photos cited in text are on file with
the AKCLC and/or the Macaulay Library (ML; www.macaulaylibrary.org) at
Cornell University. Citations to the journals Birding (B), North American
Birds (NAB), and Western Birds (WB) are abbreviated. We abbreviate refer-
ences to five of the six biogeographic regions of Alaska (Gibson and Withrow
2015): northern (n), western (w), southwestern (sw), south-central (s-c),
and southeastern (se); interior Alaska is written out. Maintained separately,
the list of species “unsubstantiated” in Alaska currently comprises 21 species
(including two species pairs) for which we have on file detailed sight reports
but no specimen or definitively identifiable photo or audio recording.
ADDITIONS TO THE ALASKA LIST
AND FIRST ALASKA SPECIMEN RECORDS
Podiceps nigricollis C. L. Brehm, 1831 {Germany}. Eared Grebe. Breeds Eurasia,
Africa, and North America (sw and s-c Canada to s-c Mexico)—in three subspecies
(Cullen et al. 1999). Podiceps nigricollis californicus Heermann, 1854 {California}.
Interior British Columbia and s Manitoba south locally through w USA (California, s
Nevada, c Arizona, n New Mexico and s Texas) and c USA (c Minnesota, nw Iowa, n
Nebraska) to s-c Mexico. First AlAskA specimens: Univ. Alaska Museum (UAM)
36350, hatching-year , 7 Oct 2014; and UAM 39297, hatching-year , 27 Oct
2016—both Middleton Island, Gulf of Alaska (DeCicco et al. 2017; photo WB
48:237, 2017). The specimens were identified as the North American subspecies by
Withrow at UAM. HistOry in AlAskA: Casual in s-c and interior Alaska, once in se
(see Gibson et al. 2003, Gibson and Withrow 2015).
Selasphorus calliope (Gould, 1847) {= Real del Monte, Hidalgo}. Calliope Hum-
mingbird. Breeds w Canada (s-c British Columbia and sw Alberta) and w USA. First
AlAskA record (no specimen; photos AKCLC and ML): hatching-year male, 3–5
Sep 2016, Auke Bay, Juneau (G. B. van Vliet and P. A. Rose). HistOry in AlAskA:
Long ago, Willett (1921:159) wrote, “According to [local resident F. H.] Gray, quite
common at Wrangell in spring and fall during some years; other years apparently
absent.” After a hiatus of four decades, there were six unsubstantiated reports in se
Alaska from the late 1960s through the 1980s: male, in May 1967, Juneau (R. J.
Gordon); female, 6 May 1968, Juneau (R. J. Gordon); at least one, in summer 1968,
Juneau (fide R. J Gordon); one, 27 Jul 1974, Juneau (E. S. Dunn); male, 14 Aug
1975, Little Port Walter, Baranof Island (A. C. Wertheimer); and female, 18 Jun
1988, Mitkof Island (P. J. Walsh).
FOURTH REPORT OF THE ALASKA CHECKLIST COMMITTEE, 2013–2017
176
Numenius americanus Bechstein, 1812 {New York}. Long-billed Curlew. Breeds
sw and s-c Canada (s-c British Columbia, s Alberta to s Manitoba) and w and s-c
USA. First AlAskA record (no specimen; photos NAB 68:414, 2015, and WB
46:121, 2015): One bird with a Whimbrel, 3–7 May 2014, Eagle River mouth,
Juneau (D. Sanvik and M. Kallenberger; Tobish 2015a). HistOry in AlAskA: There
were three unsubstantiated reports of single birds from 1973 to 2008 in se and s-c
Alaska: One with four Whimbrels, 5–6 Jun 1973, Eagle Beach, Juneau (Gibson and
Byrd 1973); one alone, 4 May 1992, Sergief Island, Stikine River flats (Tobish and
Isleib 1992); and one bird, 30 May 2008, Situk River, Yakutat (Tobish 2008). Gabri-
elson and Lincoln (1959) had listed this species as hypothetical on the basis of five
unsatisfactory reports in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s distribution files. nOtes:
Monotypic (Grinnell 1921, Hellmayr and Conover 1948).
Ardenna carneipes (Gould, 1844) {small islands off Cape Leeuwin, Western
Australia}. Flesh-footed Shearwater. Breeds Île St. Paul, islands off sw Australia,
Lord Howe Island, islands off North Island and in Cook Strait (New Zealand). First
AlAskA record: One bird, 21 Aug 2013, Gulf of Alaska at 59° 34 N, 141° 58 W
(A. J. Lang, R. W. Dittrick, and M. Vaughn; photos AKCLC and ML). First AlAskA
specimen: UAM 36300, ad. , 8 Sep 2014, off Middleton Island, Gulf of Alaska
(DeCicco et al. 2017; photo WB 48:253, 2017). HistOry in AlAskA: Maintained
as a casual or intermittent summer/autumn visitant in the Gulf of Alaska by Isleib
and Kessel (1973), Kessel and Gibson (1978), and Gibson and Byrd (2007), but not
substantiated in Alaska waters until 2013 (Tobish 2014, Gibson and Withrow 2015),
after which DeCicco et al. (2017) described this species as currently rare to fairly
common in fall in the n Gulf of Alaska. See also Bond and Lavers (2015).
Puffinus puffinus (Brünnich, 1764) {= Faeroe Islands}. Manx Shearwater. Breeds
Iceland, Faeroes, islands off British Isles and w France, Azores, Madeira, and Middle
Lawn Island (Newfoundland). First AlAskA specimens: UAM 34000, ad. , 30
Aug 2013; and UAM 34001, ad. , 17 Sep 2013—both Middleton Island, Gulf of
Alaska (DeCicco et al. 2017; photos WB 39:192, 2008; 48:253, 2017). HistOry
FOURTH REPORT OF THE ALASKA CHECKLIST COMMITTEE, 2013–2017
Figure 1. Nazca Booby (Sula granti), 30 Aug 2017, 21 km off East Amatuli Island,
Barren Islands, Alaska, at 58° 55 N, 151° 35 W.
Photo by M. G. Levine
177
in AlAskA outlined by Gibson et al. (2008). Rare summer/autumn visitant in n Gulf
of Alaska, first substantiated by photo in 2005.
Sula granti Rothschild, 1902 {Galápagos archipelago = Culpepper Island}. Nazca
Booby. Breeds c-e Pacific Ocean (Galápagos, Clarión, San Benedicto, Clipperton,
Malpelo, and la Plata islands). First AlAskA record (no specimen; photos AKCLC
and ML; Figure 1): ad., 30 Aug 2017, 21 km off East Amatuli Island, Barren Islands,
entrance to Cook Inlet, at 58° 55ʹ N, 151° 35ʹ W (M. G. Levine). This identification
was corroborated by J. L. Dunn (in litt., 2017) and K. L. Garrett (in litt., 2017). The
committee did not agree on the identification of an adult Masked/Nazca booby seen
six days earlier, on 24 Aug 2017, 64 km south of Tugidak Island, Kodiak archipelago,
at 55° 58 N, 154° 34 W (S. Cobb—photos AKCLC and ML), so it maintains the
record as of an unidentified S. dactylatra/S. granti. nOtes: As of 2015, Searcy et
al. (2018) acknowledged just three California records of S. granti, 22 of S. dacty-
latra (Masked Booby), and 20 of S. dactylatra/S. granti. But by November 2017
the number of Calfornia records of S. granti had grown to 12 (californiabirds.org/
cbrc_book/update.pdf). See Pitman and Jehl (1998) and AOU (2000). We did not
find other published records of S. granti (or S. dactylatra) north of California waters.
Sula leucogaster (Boddaert, 1783) {= Cayenne}. Brown Booby. Breeds widely
in tropical oceans: Caribbean and Atlantic islands off South America; São Tomé,
Príncipe, Annobón, Ascension, and St. Helena islands; islands in the eastern Pacific
from Islas Los Coronados (Whitworth et al. 2007) and the Gulf of California, south
at least to Isla Gorgona, Colombia; Red Sea, Indian Ocean, se Asian seas to New
Guinea and Northern Australia, w and c Pacific Ocean—in four subspecies (Dickinson
and Remsen 2013). Sula leucogaster [brewsteri Goss, 1888 {Isla San Pedro Mártir,
Gulf of California}]. Islas Los Coronados, Gulf of California, and Revillagigedo, Marías,
Isabel, and Clipperton islands. First AlAskA records (no specimen; photos [of
FOURTH REPORT OF THE ALASKA CHECKLIST COMMITTEE, 2013–2017
Figure 2. Red-footed Booby (Sula sula), 10 Sep 2015, 15.7 km off East Chugach
Island, Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, at 58° 54 N, 151° 12 W.
Photo by L. H. DeCicco
178
each of the eight] AKCLC and ML): ad. female, 28 Oct 2014, 296 km east-southeast
of Kodiak Island, at 56° 02 N, 148° 04 W (J. Smith; Gibson and Withrow 2015,
Tobish 2015b; photo NAB 69:138, 2015); ad. female, landed aboard ship, 29 Oct
2014, off Kruzof Island, Alexander Archipelago (M. Goff and J. Cedarleaf; Gibson
and Withrow 2015, Tobish 2015b); imm. aboard ship, 28 Aug 2015, ~12 km south
of Amlia Island, c Aleutian Islands, at 51° 57ʹ N 173° 07ʹ W (J. Greenway; Tobish
2017—photo NAB 70:136, 2017); ad. female, 13 Sep 2015, Wrangell Narrows,
near Petersburg (J. Sebastian; Tobish 2017); ad. female, 20 Jul 2016, near Dutch
Harbor, Unalaska Island, e Aleutian Islands (T. Foley); ad. female landed aboard ship,
6 Aug 2016, Salisbury Sound, Kruzof Island, Alexander Archipelago (K. Martinsen);
ad. female, 12 Aug 2017, 120 km east of Marmot Island, Kodiak archipelago, at 58°
13ʹ N 149° 43ʹ W (S. Cobb); and, three weeks later, a different ad. female, 6 Sep
2017, 88 km east-southeast of Marmot Island, Kodiak archipelago (C. Johnson).
nOtes: Breeding range extended north to Los Coronados Islands, Baja California, in
2005 (Whitworth et al. 2007). For reference to the scale of the irruption that reached
Alaska, see records and discussion of this species in fall 2014 and 2015 in British
Columbia (Charlesworth 2015c, 2017), Oregon and Washington (Irons et al. 2015,
Waggoner and Merrill 2017), and California (Davis et al. 2015, 2017, McCaskie and
Garrett 2015, 2017). HistOry in AlAskA: A specimen (UAM 11555, ad. ) was
collected 15 Jul 2000 in c Bering Sea (at 58° 44 N, 174° 09 W) after landing aboard
the same ship on 13 and 15 Jul. It was identified as S. l. plotus (Forster, 1844) {near
New Caledonia} by Gibson at UAM. In the absence of an obvious summer storm,
Gibson and Withrow (2015) judged that bird unlikely to have reached the Bering Sea
without direct human assistance (see also Red-footed Booby below).
Sula sula (Linnaeus, 1766) {= Barbados}. Red-footed Booby. Breeds Caribbean
and tropical sw Atlantic islands; tropical Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean east to Ha-
waiian Islands, Line Islands, Îles Marquises, and Pitcairn Island; islands off w Mexico;
Islas de Coco, Isla de la Plata, Galápagos Islands—in three subspecies (Dickinson
and Remsen 2013; but cf. Murphy [1936] and Schreiber et al. [1996]. The work of
Baiao et al. [2007] lends credence to Nelson’s [1978:654] comment that perhaps
the species’ variation “is theoretically most meaningfully described in purely geneti-
cal, rather than taxonomic terms”). Sula sula [websteri Rothschild, 1898 {Clarión
Island, Revillagigedo Islands}]. Islands off w Mexico (Clarión and San Benedicto; Islas
Marías), Cocos Island, Isla de la Plata, Galápagos Islands. First AlAskA record
(no specimen; photos AKCLC and ML; Figure 2): imm., 10 Sep 2015, 15.7 km off
East Chugach Island, Kenai Peninsula, at 58° 54 N, 151° 12 W (L. H. DeCicco;
Tobish 2017). An immature identified two weeks earlier, on 25 Aug 2015, 148 km
southeast of the town of Kodiak, Kodiak Island, at 56° 48 N, 150° 30 W (R. L. Pit-
man; Tobish 2017) was not photographed. nOtes: seven records during the period
5 Jul–24 Sep 2015 were the most ever accepted in a single year by the California
Bird Records Committee (Searcy et al. 2018:34); those birds “were most likely a result
of the strengthening El Niño-Southern Oscillation. All were immatures and six of the
seven died.” We did not find other published records between California waters and
the Gulf of Alaska. HistOry in AlAskA: Ship-assisted arrival in Alaska waters was
documented in Aug 1999 when an immature accompanied the 145-ft yacht Royal
Eagle from Hawaii to Kodiak (see Anchorage Daily News, 12 Aug 1999, including
photo—identified as a “brown booby”).
Plegadis chihi (Vieillot, 1817) {= Paraguay and the campos of Buenos Aires,
Argentina}. White-faced Ibis. Breeds locally in w and c USA (n California, e Oregon,
n Utah, Colorado, Nebraska), south locally to c Mexico, and locally from se Bolivia
and s Brazil to c Chile and c Argentina. First AlAskA record (no specimen; photos
AKCLC and ML; Figure 3): One bird, 19 May 2016, Klawock, Prince of Wales Island
(J. Colon). An unidentified Plegadis ibis was recorded three days later, on 22 May
FOURTH REPORT OF THE ALASKA CHECKLIST COMMITTEE, 2013–2017
179
2016, at Haines (A. Mulyca via P. Randles, photos AKCLC). nOtes: This species was
described as very rare in s British Columbia by Campbell et al. (1990a). More recent
records in that province have included one on s Vancouver Island on 31 May 2012
(Charlesworth 2013a:506—“increasingly common”); “an unprecedented invasion”
in May 2015, when at least 19 birds provided four spring–summer records, includ-
ing up to 12 birds near Kamloops from 13 May to at least 10 Aug (Charlesworth
2016:471–472); and two separate juveniles in Sep 2016, at which season “still
exceptionally unusual” (Charlesworth 2017:104). “In recent years this species has
become an annual winter resident” in Hawaii, where in winter 2015–2016 recorded
in a flock of eight on Molokai, possibly the same flock (of seven) on Oahu, a flock of
four on Oahu, and a lone bird on Maui (Tanino 2016:513).
Milvus migrans (Boddaert, 1783) {= France}. Black Kite. Breeds Africa, Arabia,
Eurasia, and Lesser Sundas to Celebes, New Guinea, and Australia—in seven sub-
species (Dickinson and Remsen 2013). Milvus migrans [lineatus (J. E. Gray, 1831)
{China}]. Siberia, Russian Far East east to Sea of Okhotsk, Amurland, and Ussuriland,
south to Manchuria, Korea, Japan (Kyushu), China, etc. First AlAskA record
(no specimen; photos AKCLC and ML; Figure 4): One bird, 2–3 Jan 2017, St. Paul
Island, Pribilof Islands (B. Lestenkoff). nOtes: Records in the Hawaiian Islands (at
Midway Atoll in Jan–Feb 1962, Dec 1994–Mar 1995, and Jan–Jun 1998) have
similarly involved midwinter arrivals (see Pyle 1998, AOU 2000, Pyle and Pyle 2017).
Asio otus (Linnaeus, 1758) {= Sweden}. Long-eared Owl. Breeds Canary Islands;
Azores, nw Africa and Eurasia east to Russian Far East (to Sea of Okhotsk), south to
Mediterranean and sw Asia; North America from s Canada to Baja California and
c-s USA—in three subspecies (Vaurie 1965, Gibson and Withrow 2015). Asio otus
[otus]. Azores, nw Africa and Eurasia east to Russian Far East (to Sea of Okhotsk).
AdditionAl subspecies (no specimen; photos AKCLC and ML; Figure 5): One bird
captured and released, 8–11 Jun 2016, Buldir Island, w Aleutian Islands (M. Mudge
and K. Pietrzak). The record of a Long-eared Owl, 19 May 2006, aboard a ship in
the Bering Sea southwest of St. Lawrence Island, at 63° 15 N, 173° 44 W, was
likely an example of this subspecies as well (Gibson et al. 2008; photo WB 39:198,
2008). nOtes: Paler than New World A. o. wilsonianus (Lesson, 1830) {Pennsyl-
vania}, A. o. otus has tawny-buff facial discs and orange-red irides. Compare Figure
5 with published photos of Long-eared Owls in se Alaska at NAB 64:133, 2010
(not in color); 66:194, 2012 (in color); 67:140, 2013 (in color at http://nab.aba.
org/i/233397-volume-67-no1-2013?token=YTA5ODk1MWNlYTU4NWM3NWZi
NzdhMmY1OGIzYjY0YjM1ZTRlNmY1NA%3D%3D); and 69:281, 2016 (in color
at http://nab.aba.org/i/705084-volume-69-no2-2016?token=YTA5ODk1MWNl
YTU4NWM3NWZiNzdhMmY1OGIzYjY0YjM1ZTRlNmY1NA%3D%3D). See also
Gibson and Withrow (2015).
Melanerpes lewis (G. R. Gray, 1849) {= Montana, about lat. 46° N}. Lewis’s
Woodpecker. Breeds sw Canada (se British Columbia) and w USA. First AlAskA
record: UAM 40000, imm. , seen 10–29 Nov 2016, Petersburg (S. Rice, B.
L. Hunter, and K. Cornelius); specimen salvaged 17 Dec 2016 (B. Lyons); photos
AKCLC and ML. nOtes: Rare in British Columbia away from the dry s interior
(Charlesworth 2010). Formerly nested in coastal sw BC but declined after 1940 and
last nested in 1963 (Vierling et al. 2013). Three records in n-c interior BC, as far
north as Prince George (Sep 2010; Charlesworth 2011), and three older extralimital
fall records in Haida Gwaii (22 Oct [1938]–29 Nov [1949]; Campbell et al. 1990b).
Salpinctes obsoletus (Say, 1822) {n part of Douglas Co., Colorado, near junction
of Plum Creek with South Platte River}. Rock Wren. Breeds sw Canada (s-c British
Columbia, s Alberta, w Saskatchewan) to Costa Rica—in six to 11 subspecies (Lowther
et al. 2000). Salpinctes obsoletus [obsoletus]. Sw Canada and w USA to s-c Mexico.
FOURTH REPORT OF THE ALASKA CHECKLIST COMMITTEE, 2013–2017
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FOURTH REPORT OF THE ALASKA CHECKLIST COMMITTEE, 2013–2017
Figure 3. White-faced Ibis (Plegadis chihi), 19 May 2016, Klawock, Prince of Wales
Island, Alaska.
Photo by J. Colon
Figure 4. Black Kite (Milvus migrans), 2 Jan 2017, St. Paul Island, Pribilof Islands,
Alaska.
Photo by B. Lestenkoff
181
First AlAskA record (no specimen; photos AKCLC and ML; Figure 6): One bird,
3 Jul–18 Nov 2017, Gustavus (B. B. Paige, N. K. Drumheller). nOtes: In w Canada,
“summer vagrants (May–Jul) recorded north to ne British Columbia, nw Mackenzie
[= Northwest Territories], n Alberta, and n Manitoba” (Lowther et al. 2000); see also
Godfrey (1986), Warning (2016).
Phylloscopus inornatus (Blyth, 1842) {= near Calcutta}. Yellow-browed Warbler.
Breeds Urals, Siberia, and Russian Far East east to Anadyrland, south to Altai, n Korea,
ne Mongolia, and ne China. First AlAskA specimen: UAM 36492, hatching-year
unsexed, 19 Sep 2014, Middleton Island, Gulf of Alaska (DeCicco et al. 2017; photo
NAB 69:39, 2015, and WB 48: 262, 2017). HistOry in AlAskA: Casual in w Alaska
at St. Lawrence Island; accidental in sw Alaska in w Aleutian Islands at Attu Island
and in s-c Alaska at Middleton Island (see Gibson et al. 2003, Gibson and Withrow
2015 and citations therein, DeCicco et al. 2017). nOtes: Monotypic when subspe-
cies humei (Brooks, 1878) {North-West Frontier Province, India} is recognized as
a species (Hume’s Leaf Warbler)—see Sangster et al. (2002) but compare Red’kin
and Konovalova (2004). Dickinson and Christidis (2014) maintained inornatus in
Abrornis J. E. and G. R. Gray, 1847.
Phylloscopus examinandus Stresemann, 1913 {Bali}. Kamchatka Leaf Warbler.
Breeds e Russian Far East (Kamchatka). First AlAskA records founded on taxo-
nomic revision of Phylloscopus borealis (Blasius, 1858) {= Sea of Okhotsk}, the Arctic
Warbler (see Alström et al. 2011, Chesser et al. 2014, Withrow et al. 2016). Alaska
specimens (n = 24: UAM, 22; U.S. National Museum, 2) identified by comparisons of
genetic with phenotypic data. HistOry in AlAskA: Casual or intermittent migrant in
sw Alaska in the w Aleutian Islands; recorded in w Alaska at St. Matthew Island and
on the Yukon–Kuskokwim delta (see Gibson and Withrow 2015). nOtes: Molecular
studies suggested that this taxon and P. xanthodryas (Swinhoe, 1863) {Amoy}, the
Japanese Leaf Warbler, are separate species—distinct from P. borealis and from
each other (Alström et al. 2011). This Kamchatka-nesting species is a migrant in the
w Aleutians (Chesser et al. 2014), and the name P. examinandus supplants prior
Aleutian references to P. borealis xanthodryas and to P. b. borealis.
Acrocephalus aedon (Pallas, 1776) {Dauria}. Thick-billed Warbler. Breeds s Sibe-
ria east through Russian Far East to Amur River basin and Ussuriland, and in China
from Manchuria south to Hebei (Hopeh) Province—in two subspecies (Dickinson
and Christidis 2014). Acrocephalus aedon [stegmanni Watson, 1985 {Radde, e
Amurland}]. W and middle Amur basin, Ussuriland, and ne China. First AlAskA
record (no specimen; photos AKCLC and ML; this issue’s front cover): One bird,
8–13 Sep 2017, Gambell, St. Lawrence Island (Rosenberg et al. 2018). nOtes: This
species has been maintained long and widely in Acrocephalus J. A. and F. Naumann,
1811 (see Vaurie 1959, Watson 1986, Parkin et al. 2004, Bairlein 2006, OSJ 2012).
Some recent authorities have included it in the genus Iduna Keyserling and Blasius,
1840 (Fregin et al. 2009, Clements et al. 2017), while others have emphasized its
distinctiveness by assigning it to a monotypic genus—to Arundinax Blyth, 1845
(Dickinson and Christidis 2014), to Phragamaticola Jerdon, 1845 (Kennerly and
Pearson 2010), or to (the emended) Phragmaticola Blyth, 1849 (Dickinson 2003).
The subspecies are weakly differentiated, and the species is sometimes treated as
monotypic; see Williamson (1976), Cramp (1992), Svensson (1992), and Parkin et
al. (2004). Casual or accidental in Japan (Honshu, Hegura-jima), where four records,
one in fall (see OSJ 2012).
Acrocephalus dumetorum Blyth, 1849 {India}. Blyth’s Reed Warbler. Breeds from
Finland, the Baltic states, and n Ukraine to w and c Siberia (northeast to Vilyuysk,
southwestern Yakutia), n and se Kazakhstan, n Tien Shan, and nw Mongolia. First
AlAskA record (no specimen; photos AKCLC and ML; B 49[6]:48, 2017): One
FOURTH REPORT OF THE ALASKA CHECKLIST COMMITTEE, 2013–2017
182
bird, 18–21 Sep 2015, Gambell, St. Lawrence Island (C. Irrigoo Jr., P. E. Lehman,
M. M. Taylor, C. Feeney, L. Peavler, P. W. Sykes; Tobish 2017). Authoritative com-
ments on this identification included those from P. Kennerly (in litt., 2015): “There is
no doubt about this one. It’s a typical Blyth’s Reed. In addition to the emargination
on P4, the rump is concolorous with the mantle, and the primary projection is shorter
than that of Reed and Marsh Warblers, all classic features of Blyth’s Reed. Paddyfield
FOURTH REPORT OF THE ALASKA CHECKLIST COMMITTEE, 2013–2017
Figure 6. Rock Wren (Salpinctes obsoletus), 14 Jul 2017, Gustavus, Alaska.
Photo by J. D. Levison
Figure 5. Long-eared Owl (Asio otus), 8–11 Jun 2016, Buldir Island, w Aleutian
Islands, Alaska.
Photo by M. Mudge and K. Pietrzak
183
is easily eliminated by the lack of supercilium behind the eye, and by the lack of warm
brown tones to the upperparts.” And from J. Hough (in litt., 2015): “I see this as a
fairly typical Blyth’s. Even on the ground the emarginations on the primaries fall level
with the end of the tertial tips. The concolorous tertials lacking any contrast between
the darker center and a paler fringe and the head pattern, with a weak, post-ocular
super and loral ‘bulge’ are all classic Blyth’s features.” HistOry in AlAskA: One
earlier, unsubstantiated report, of one bird on 9 Sep 2010, also at Gambell (Lehman
and Ake 2011), about which the AKCLC (Gibson et al. 2013:191) wrote, “Of the
many photos taken, most are of poor quality or are flight shots [on file AKCLC]. None
show clearly the wing formula, and similar species in this difficult genus, such as the
Large-billed Reed Warbler (A. orinus) and Eurasian Reed Warbler (A. scirpaceus),
cannot be entirely eliminated.” nOtes: Accidental in Japan (twice in fall, once in
spring; OSJ 2012).
Locustella fluviatilis (Wolf, 1810) {Danube in Austria}. River Warbler. Breeds c
and e Europe, into sw Siberia, east to the Irtysh River. First AlAskA record (no
specimen; photos AKCLC and ML; WB 49:137–138, 2018): One bird, 7 Oct 2017,
Gambell, St. Lawrence Island (Lehman 2018). nOtes: Extralimital in w Europe (Vaurie
1959), but apparently not known in e Asia (see Vaurie 1959, Brazil 2009, OSJ 2012).
Phoenicurus phoenicurus (Linnaeus, 1758) {= Sweden}. Common Redstart.
Breeds Europe and nw Africa to c Siberia (east to the upper Nizhnyaya Tunguska
River and Lake Baikal) and n Mongolia; Asia Minor to Turkmenistan, s Uzbekistan, and
Iran—in two subspecies (Vaurie 1959, Dickinson and Christidis 2014). Phoenicurus
phoenicurus [phoenicurus]. Europe and nw Africa to c Siberia and n Mongolia. First
AlAskA record (no specimen; photos NAB 68:167, 2014; 69:186, 2016): One
bird, 8–9 Oct 2013, St. Paul Island, Pribilof Islands (Schuette and Gochfeld 2016).
nOtes: Accidental in Japan (Nov 1998, Hegura-jima; OSJ 2012).
FOURTH REPORT OF THE ALASKA CHECKLIST COMMITTEE, 2013–2017
Figure 7. Pied Wheatear (Oenanthe pleschanka), 8 Jul 2017, Cape Nome, Seward
Peninsula, Alaska.
Photo by J. D. Levison
184
Oenanthe pleschanka (Lepechin, 1770) {Saratov, lower Volga}. Pied Wheatear.
Breeds se Europe to s Transbaikalia (Onon River), n China (northeast to Chaoyang,
Liaoning Province), and nw Himalayas. First AlAskA record (no specimen; photos
AKCLC and ML; Figure 7): Second-year female, 4 Jul–4 Aug 2017, Cape Nome,
Seward Peninsula (A. Harper, T. G. Tobish Jr.). nOtes: Age and sex inferred by P.
Alström (in litt., 2017). Monotypic when subspecies cypriaca (Homeyer, 1884) {Cy-
prus} is recognized as a species, the Cyprus Wheatear, as recommended by Sangster
et al. (2004) and Randler et al. (2012). Casual in Japan, where at least 16 records,
spring and fall (see OSJ 2012).
Hylocichla mustelina (J. F. Gmelin, 1789) {= New York}. Wood Thrush. Breeds
se Canada (s Ontario to Nova Scotia) and c Great Plains (se North Dakota to e
Oklahoma) to e USA. First AlAskA record (no specimen; photos B 47[5]:32,
2015; NAB 69:39, 2015): One bird, 3 Oct 2014, St. Paul Island, Pribilof Islands (S.
C. Schuette, N. Swick; Tobish 2015b). nOtes: Casual visitant in w North America
from Oregon, Utah, Montana, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba south to California,
Arizona, and New Mexico (AOU 1998). Accidental in s British Columbia (Oct 2015;
Charlesworth 2017).
Dumetella carolinensis (Linnaeus, 1766) {Virginia}. Gray Catbird. Breeds Canada
(s British Columbia, c Alberta, c Saskatchewan, s Manitoba, w Ontario) through c,
e, and se USA; Bermuda. First AlAskA specimen: UAM 36494, ad. , 14 Sep
2014, Middleton Island, Gulf of Alaska (DeCicco et al. 2017). HistOry in AlAskA:
Casual in se and s-c Alaska and accidental in w Alaska (see Gibson et al. 2003, Tobish
2011a, 2015b, 2016, Gibson and Withrow 2015).
Carpodacus roseus (Pallas, 1776) {Uda and Selenga rivers, Transbaikalia}. Pal-
las’s Rosefinch. Breeds Siberia, and Russian Far East to Amurland; Sakhalin—in two
subspecies (Browning 1988, Dickinson and Christidis 2014). Carpodacus roseus
[roseus]. Range of the species except Sakhalin. First AlAskA record (no specimen;
photos AKCLC and ML; B 49[6]:54, 2017): hatching-year male, 20–24 Sep 2015,
St. Paul Island, Pribilof Islands (C. Gregory, D. Gochfeld, T. Johnson; Tobish 2017).
nOtes: The species is a winter visitant in n Japan (see OSJ 2012).
Icterus cucullatus Swainson, 1827 {= state of México, Mexico}. Hooded Oriole.
Breeds sw USA from California to Texas; much of Mexico; Belize—in five subspecies
(Dickinson and Christidis 2014). Icterus cucullatus [nelsoni Ridgway, 1885 {Tucson,
Arizona}]. Sw USA and nw Mexico. First AlAskA record (no specimen; photos
AKCLC; NAB 70:103, 136, 2017): ad. male, 19–22 Sep 2015, Juneau (O. Squires
and M. Squires). nOtes: As of 1981 nested nw California and by early 2000s nearly
annual sw Oregon (S. G. Mlodinow in Wahl et al. 2005); eight records in Washington
(Apr–Jul; see Mlodinow et al. 2007a, b). Casual in s British Columbia (seven records
through 2001—S. G. Mlodinow, in Wahl et al. 2005; plus Dec 2013–Mar 2014
[Charlesworth 2015a, b] and May 2015 [Charlesworth 2016]). Includes subspecies
californicus (Lesson, 1844) {California}, following Phillips et al. (1964), Pyle (1997).
Oreothlypis ruficapilla (Wilson, 1811) {near Nashville, Tennessee}. Nashville
Warbler. Breeds s Canada (s British Columbia) and w USA (south in mountains to San
Bernardino Mts. of s California); s-c Canada and e USA—in two subspecies (AOU
1957). Oreothlypis ruficapilla ruficapilla. S-c Canada (Saskatchewan to Newfound-
land) and e USA (New England to West Virginia). AdditionAl subspecies: UAM
36700, hatching-year , 5 Oct 2014, Middleton Island, Gulf of Alaska (DeCicco et
al. 2017; photo WB 48:267, 2017). nOtes: Specimen identified to subspecies by
P. Pyle (in litt., 2016) at Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California,
Berkeley. Tail shorter, rump duller and more olive than in subspecies ridgwayi (van
Rossem 1929) {= East Humboldt Mts., Nevada}. See Gibson et al. (2013).
FOURTH REPORT OF THE ALASKA CHECKLIST COMMITTEE, 2013–2017
185
Setophaga americana (Linnaeus, 1758) {= South Carolina}. Northern Parula.
Breeds s-c and se Canada (se Manitoba, w and c Ontario, s Quebec) and e USA
(Minnesota, New England to Gulf of Mexico)—see Moldenhauer and Regelski (2012).
First AlAskA record (no specimen; photos AKCLC and ML; Figure 8): singing
male, 28–29 Jun 2017, Ketchikan (S. C. Heinl and A. W. Piston). HistOry in AlAskA:
One earlier, unsubstantiated report: imm., 23–24 Sep 1987, Middleton Island, Gulf
of Alaska (DeCicco et al. 2017). nOtes: North of California (where nesting almost
annually from the early 1990s; Hamilton et al. 2007) and Oregon (where a regular
migrant, most records late Apr–late Jun, east of the Cascades; Marshall et al. 2006),
casual in Washington (Wahl et al. 2005) and s British Columbia (see Campbell et al.
2001). From early 2000s rare (annual) in s British Columbia (see Cecile 2006, 2007a,
b); at least 16 records by 2015 (see Cecile 2009, Charlesworth 2011, 2013b, 2017).
Setophaga dominica (Linnaeus, 1766) {= Hispaniola}. Yellow-throated Warbler.
Breeds e USA (e Iowa to Virginia, south to Gulf of Mexico, Florida). First AlAskA
record (no specimen; photos AKCLC and ML; NAB 70:136, 2017; Figure 9):
One bird, 22–24 Sep 2015, Bartlett Cove, Glacier Bay National Park (E. Johnson,
S. Schaller, N. K. Drumheller). nOtes: Monotypic (McKay 2008). Casual or acciden-
tal widely in w North America north to s Oregon and Idaho (AOU 1998); once in
Washington (Dec 2001–Jan 2002; Wahl et al. 2005) and twice in s British Columbia
(Jan 1998; Campbell et al. 2001; May 2012; Charlesworth 2013a).
Setophaga nigrescens (J. K. Townsend, 1837) {= near Fort William, Portland,
Oregon}. Black-throated Gray Warbler. Breeds sw Canada (coastal sw British Colum-
bia), w USA, and nw Mexico. First AlAskA record (no specimen; photos AKCLC
and ML; Figure 10): ad. male, 12–22 Jun 2016, and second-year female, 10 Jul and
19 Jul 2016, Hyder (S. C. Heinl, L. Barber, L. Feldmann, J. D. Levison). HistOry
in AlAskA: One earlier, unsubstantiated report: male, 5 Jul 1989, Mitkof Island, se
Alaska (Tobish and Isleib 1989).
Pheucticus ludovicianus (Linnaeus, 1766) {= Louisiana}. Rose-breasted Gros-
beak. Breeds w Canada (ne British Columbia, n Alberta) east across s Canada to Nova
Scotia, south to c and e USA. First AlAskA specimen: UAM 34186, hatching-year
, 19 Aug 2013, Middleton Island, Gulf of Alaska (DeCicco et al. 2017). HistOry
in AlAskA: Casual or intermittent (since early 2000s) in se Alaska, accidental in s-c
Alaska and in the Interior (see Gibson et al. 2003, Heinl and Piston 2009, Tobish
2010a, b, 2011b, 2014, Gibson and Withrow 2015, DeCicco et al. 2017).
ADDITIONS TO THE ALASKA UNSUBSTANTIATED LIST
Accipiter nisus (Linnaeus, 1758) {Sweden}. Eurasian Sparrowhawk. Breeds widely
in Old World, from the Canaries, Madeira, nw Africa, the Middle East, and Eurasia
east to the Kolyma River, Sea of Okhotsk, Kamchatka, Sakhalin, and Japan south to
n Mongolia and China—in seven subspecies (Dickinson and Remsen 2013). There
have been two Alaska reports, both with written details pointing to this species, but
accompanied by unsatisfactory photos, both from Adak Island, c Aleutian Islands:
one, 7 Dec 2013, J. Puschock; one, 21 Sep 2016, F. C. Haas.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Many thanks for helpful, authoritative comments on various identifications from
Per Alström, Jon L. Dunn, Kimball L. Garrett, Julian Hough, Peter Kennerly, and
Peter Pyle, and for constructive criticism from reviewers Gary H. Rosenberg and
Philip Unitt.
FOURTH REPORT OF THE ALASKA CHECKLIST COMMITTEE, 2013–2017
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FOURTH REPORT OF THE ALASKA CHECKLIST COMMITTEE, 2013–2017
Figure 8. Northern Parula (Setophaga americana), 29 Jun 2017, Ketchikan, Alaska.
Photo by S. C. Heinl
Figure 9. Yellow-throated Warbler (Setophaga dominica), 23 Sep 2015, Bartlett
Cove, Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska.
Photo by J. D. Levison
187
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Accepted 6 August 2018
FOURTH REPORT OF THE ALASKA CHECKLIST COMMITTEE, 2013–2017
... Peninsula, 4 July-4 August 2017; Gibson et al. 2018). Habitat.-Northern ...
... Accidental in western Alaska (St. Paul Island, Pribilofs, 20-24 September 2015; immature male; photo; Pranty et al. 2016, Tobish 2017, Gibson et al. 2018). ...
... Peninsula, 4 July-4 August 2017; Gibson et al. 2018). Habitat.-Northern ...
... Accidental in western Alaska (St. Paul Island, Pribilofs, 20-24 September 2015; immature male; photo; Pranty et al. 2016, Tobish 2017, Gibson et al. 2018). ...
... Since the first specimen confirming the Nazca Booby for the United States in 2013, four additional specimens of this species have been preserved from the southern California coast: one at the Los Angeles/Ventura county line in 2018 (Benson et al. 2020; Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County 121174), two from San Diego Bay, on 30 August 2019 and 24 April 2020 [San Diego Natural History Museum (SDNHM) 56365 and 56505, respectively], and one from Imperial Beach on 10 October 2020 (SDNHM 56938). The northernmost Nazca Booby sighted along the Pacific coast was photographed on 30 August 2017, south of the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska (Gibson et al. 2018). ...
... notes: We saw most Manx shearwaters on inshore marine waters, often associated (in fall) with loafing or foraging flocks of other shearwaters. There exists a history of sight reports in the northeastern Pacific (see howell et al. 1994, Wahl et al. 2005, hamilton et al. 2007, heindel and Garrett 2008, including alaska, but the photos of birds at Middleton in spring 2005 provided the first substantiation for alaska (Gibson et al. 2008). in the western north Pacific this species was first recorded in Japan ( 1973). ...
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