Article

Molecular marker to distinguish between Matricaria recutita and Anthemis nobilis

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

Currently two types of Chamomile are used for medicinal purposes and beauty products. Both, Matricaria recutita L and Anthemis nobilis L, belong to the family Asteraceae (Compo-sitae) and are used to treat similar health problems. However, they differ in their biologically active compounds. The use of DNA barcoding was explored to distinguish between the various Chamomile species. The trnl-trnf and psbA-trnH genomic regions were investigated for their utility to distinguish between Chamomile species using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and designed oligonucleotides. A new set of markers for Chamomile was identified to distinguish between Matricaria recutita (German chamomile) and Anthemis nobilis (Roman chamomile). The PCR-RFLP and the designed oligonucleotides have the potential to be an informative tool to help distinguish between German (Matricaria recutita) and Roman chamomiles (Anthemis nobilis) plant samples.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Article
Full-text available
The coding region of the mat K gene and two intergenic spacers, psb A-trn H and trn L(UAA)-trn F(GAA), of cpDNA were sequenced to study phylogenetic relationships of 32 Paeonia species. In the psb A-trn H intergenic spacer, short sequences bordered by long inverted repeats have undergone inversions that are often homoplasious mutations. Insertions/deletions found in the two intergenic spacers, mostly resulting from slipped-strand mispairing, provided relatively reliable phylogenetic information. The mat K coding region, evolving more rapidly than the trnL-trn F spacer and more slowly than the psb A-trn H spacer, produced the best resolved phylogenetic tree. The mat K phylogeny was compared with the phylogeny obtained from sequences of internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA. A refined hypothesis of species phylogeny of section Paeonia was proposed by considering the discordance between the nuclear and cpDNA phylogenies to be results of hybrid speciation followed by inheritance of cpDNA of one parent and fixation of ITS sequences of another parent. The Eurasian and western North American disjunct distribution of the genus may have resulted from interrruption of the continuous distribution of ancestral populations of extant peony species across the Bering land bridge during the Miocene. Pleistocene glaciation may have played an important role in triggering extensive reticulate evolution within section Paeonia and shifting distributional ranges of both parental and hybrid species.
Article
Full-text available
A type-IV-allergic reaction to German camomile (Matricaria chamomilla) in a form of allergic contact dermatitis is not unusual. However, only a few cases of anaphylactic reaction to camomile have been described in the literature. We present the case of a 38-year-old Caucasian man who developed an episode of severe anaphylaxis with generalized urticaria, angioedema and severe dyspnoea one hour after consuming camomile tea. Laboratory examination demonstrated a total serum IgE of 123 kU/l with specific IgE against camomile (4.94 kU/l, class 3). Skin prick test and labial provocation test with camomile showed a strong positive reaction. Our case confirms the presence of a type-I allergy to orally ingested camomile and indicates that the incidence and risk may be underestimated. Additional response to mugwort and pollen-derived food allergens should be evaluated in patients sensitised to camomile due to a higher incidence of allergic cross-reactivity.
Article
Full-text available
Six primers for the amplification of three non-coding regions of chloroplast DNA via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been designed. In order to find out whether these primers were universal, we used them in an attempt to amplify DNA from various plant species. The primers worked for most species tested including algae, bryophytes, pteridophytes, gymnosperms and angiosperms. The fact that they amplify chloroplast DNA non-coding regions over a wide taxonomic range means that these primers may be used to study the population biology (in supplying markers) and evolution (inter- and probably intraspecific phylogenies) of plants.
Article
Full-text available
We report a case of an 8-year-old atopic boy in whom ingestion of a chamomile-tea infusion precipitated a severe anaphylactic reaction. The patient suffers from hay fever and bronchial asthma caused by a variety of pollens (grass, olive, and mugwort). This severe reaction was developed after his first ingestion of chamomile tea. Studies revealed the presence of immediate skin test reactivity and a positive passive transfer test to chamomile-tea extract. Moreover, both specific antichamomile-tea extract and anti-Matricaria chamomilla-pollen extract IgE antibodies were detected by an ELISA technique. Cross-reactivity among chamomile-tea extract and the pollens of Matricaria chamomilla, Ambrosia trifida (giant ragweed), and Artemisia vulgaris (mugwort), was demonstrated by an ELISA-inhibition study. These findings suggest a type I IgE-mediated immunologic mechanism as being responsible for the patient's anaphylactic symptoms and also suggest that the patient cross-reacted the pollens of Matricaria chamomilla contained in the chamomile tea because he was previously sensitized to Artemisia pollen.
Article
An anaphylactic reaction to chamomile tea is reported. It is postulated that cross-sensitivity may occur between this Compositae plant and ragweed.
Article
The antimicrobial activity of an essential Roman chamomile flower oil from the Provence (France) was tested against various strains of Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella sp.) as well as against the yeast Candida albicans using a modified agar dilution and agar diffusion method. In addition, some pure main and minor compounds (chemical composition obtained by means of GC and GC/MS measurements), such as isobutyl angelate (32.1%), 2-methylbutyl angelate (16.2%), isobutyl isobutyrate (5.3%), methyl 2-methylbutyrate (1.9%), prenyl acetate (1.4%), 2-methylbutyl 2-methylbutyrate (1.2%) and 2-methylbutyl acetate (1.2%), were also studied for their antimicrobial effects. The Roman chamomile sample showed high antimicrobial activity against all strains of tested microbes (reference compounds: eugenol and three synthetic antibiotics). A similar result was found for 2-methylbutyl 2-methylbutyrate, 2-methylbutyl acetate and prenyl acetate. Surprisingly, no antimicrobial effects against Escherichia coli by methyl 2-methylbutyrate and against Klebsiella pneumoniae by 2-methylbutyl angelate and methyl 2-methylbutyrate as well as by isobutyl isobutyrate against Staphylococcus aureus were observed. It is proposed that the very high antimicrobial activity of Roman chamomile oil from the Provence results of effects found for both main and minor constituents of this oil.
Article
In this study, the effect of Matricaria recutita L. essential oil (MEO) on the central nervous system (CNS) of mice was investigated using some behavioral methods. Chemical profiling both by GC and GC-MS analyses of the hydrodistilled essential oil of M. recutita revealed α-bisabolol oxide A (28%), α-bisabolol oxide B (17.1%), (Z)-β-Farnesene (15.9%) and α-bisabolol (6.8%) as the main components. Changes induced by MEO (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg) and reference drug caffeine (25 mg/kg) in spontaneous locomotor activities and motor coordinations of mice were investigated by activity cage measurements and Rota-Rod tests, respectively. Open field, social interaction and elevated plus-maze tests were applied to assess the emotional state of the animals. Further, tail-suspension test was performed for evaluating the effect of MEO on depression levels of mice. As a result, at 50 and 100 mg/kg, MEO significantly increased the numbers of spontaneous locomotor activities, exhibited anxiogenic effect in the open field, elevated plus-maze and social interaction tests and decreased the immobility times of animals in tail suspension tests. The falling latencies in Rota-Rod tests did not change. This activity profile of MEO was similar to the typical psychostimulant caffeine. The exact mechanism of action underlying this stimulant-like effect should be clarified with further detailed studies.
Article
Medicinal remedies of plant origin became very popular in recent years, and allergic reactions to these are on the rise, accordingly. Camomile has been reported as a potential trigger of severe anaphylaxis. The allergens responsible for camomile allergy have not been characterized as yet. The present study aims at reviewing the clinical symptomatology of immediate-type reactions in a series of patients sensitized to camomile and at characterizing the responsible allergens. Fourteen patients with a history of allergy either to camomile or to spices or weeds, and a positive skin prick test/RAST to camomile were investigated for related allergic reactions to food, pollen and others. IgE-binding patterns were determined by immunoblotting, inhibition tests and deglycosylation experiments. Ten of 14 patients had a clinical history of immediate-type reactions to camomile, in some cases life threatening. Eleven subjects were also sensitized to mugwort in prick or RAST, eight to birch tree pollen. Using a polyclonal rabbit anti-Bet v 1 antibody, a homologue of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 was detected in two camomile blots. In four cases a group of higher molecular weight allergens (23-50 kDa) showed IgE-binding to camomile. All allergens proved heat stable. Binding was inhibited in variable degrees by extracts from celery roots, anize seeds and pollen from mugwort, birch and timothy grass. Deglycosylation experiments proved the presence of carbohydrate determinants in camomile which were not responsible for IgE-binding, though. Profilins (Bet v 2) were not detected in our camomile extracts. Incidence and risk of type I allergy to camomile may be underestimated. Concurrent sensitization to mugwort and birch pollen is not infrequent. Bet v 1 and noncarbohydrate higher molecular weight proteins were found to be eliciting allergens and are responsible for cross-reactivity with other foods and pollen.