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Plan de Conservación para Aves Playeras en Ecuador - Informe Completo

Authors:
  • Fundación Aves y Conservación

Abstract

Este documento técnico presenta la información completa de tres años de investigación sobre aves playeras en Ecuador. Este documento sirve como un respaldo al Resumen Ejecutivo del Plan de Conservación de Aves Playeras recientemente publicado (Diciembre 2017).
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