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Provenance-Enabled Stewardship of Human Data in the GDPR Era: 7th International Provenance and Annotation Workshop, IPAW 2018, London, UK, July 9-10, 2018, Proceedings

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Abstract

Within life-science research the upcoming EU General Data Protection Regulation has a significant operational impact on organisations that use and exchange controlled-access Human Data. One implication of the GDPR is data bookkeeping. In this poster we describe a software tool, the Data Information System (DAISY), designed to record data protection relevant provenance of Human Data held and exchanged by research organisations.

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