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Abstract

The development of valid measures of adolescent dating aggression through social network sites and instant messages is still scarce. The aim of this study was to analyze the measurement invariance of an instrument assessing online control, intrusiveness and jealousy among adolescent couples in Spain and Mexico. Participants were 530 adolescents with romantic experience (223 Spanish, 51.57% girls; 307 Mexicans, 49.35% girls), mean aged 15.82 (Spain) and 16.30 (Mexico). Multi-group analyses showed a consistent factorial invariance of the measure. Prevalence rates were higher than 70% in both countries. Mexican adolescents scored higher in control than Spaniards, and Mexican boys were more intrusive than girls. Results emphasized the cultural equivalence of the constructs and similarities between countries in adolescents' aggressive online behavior.

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... Additionally, suffering VDR in the adolescent stages is directly associated with a greater perpetration and victimization of more severe types of abuse in adulthood or young adulthood [21][22][23]. VDR has also been identified with an important risk factor associated with suffering from severe health problems such as depression, anxiety, and drug consumption, sexual practices without protection, suicide, and even homicide [24][25][26][27]. ...
... This CADRI version had a total of 34 items, divided into two sub-scales: abuse exerted and abuse suffered. The different types of abuse analyzed were: relational abuse exerted (items: 1,8,17), (e.g., I tried to isolate him or her from his/her group of friends), verbal-emotional abuse exerted (items: 2, 3, 5, 6,7,9,10,11,13,15), (e.g., I did something to make my partner jealous), physical abuse exerted (items: 4, 12, 14, 16), (e.g., I threw an object), relational abuse suffered (items: 18,25,34), (e.g., he or she tried to isolate me from my group of friends), verbal-emotional abuse suffered (items: 19,20,22,23,24,26,27,28,30,32), (e.g., he or she did something to make me jealous), and physical abuse suffered (items: 21, 29, 31, 33), (e.g., he or she threw an object at me). The participants responded to each item by selecting one of the following response options: Never (this has not happened in the relationship), rarely (this has only happened on 1 or 2 occasions), sometimes (this has happened between 3 to 5 times), and frequently (this has happened 6 or more times). ...
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... To date, cyber dating aggression prevalence rates vary from 8% to 80% (Cutbush et al., 2021;Kernsmith et al., 2018;Morelli et al., 2018;Sánchez-Jiménez et al., 2017;Yahner et al., 2015). Cyber sexual aggression is less frequent than other types of cyber dating aggression (Dick et al., 2014;Reed et al., 2017;Zweig et al., 2013), and the results for verbal/emotional aggression and control are inconclusive. ...
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Background: Within the context of the widespread use of technologies by adolescents, the objectives of this study were to identify the perpetrators of intimate partner cyberstalking (IPCS) in adolescents; to analyze the relationship between IPCS and gender, age, sexting behaviors, pornography consumption, and ambivalent sexism; and to investigate the influence of the study variables as predictors of IPCS and determine their moderating role. Methods: Participants were 993 Spanish students of Secondary Education, 535 girls and 458 boys with mean age 15.75 (SD = 1.47). Of the total sample, 70.3% (n = 696) had or had had a partner. Results: Boys perform more sexting, consume more pornographic content, and have more hostile and benevolent sexist attitudes than girls. However, girls perpetrate more IPCS than boys. The results of the hierarchical multiple regression indicate that hostile sexism is a predictor of IPCS, as well as the combined effect of Gender × Pornography and Benevolent Sexism × Sexting. Conclusions: it is essential to implement sexual affective education programs in schools in which Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are incorporated so that boys and girls can experience their relationships, both offline and online, in an egalitarian and violence-free way.
... In the case of Spain, research into dating violence is in its infancy [21], yielding prevalence rates for physical violence [22,23], psychological violence [24], sexual violence [25], and online violence [26] similar to those reported in international studies. The development of evidencebased programs has been limited and, given the variability in approaches, duration, methodological designs, and components, it is difficult to draw conclusions on this subject. ...
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Digital Youth: The Role of Media in Development recognizes the important role of digital tools in the lives of teenagers and presents both the risks and benefits of these new interactive technologies. From social networking to instant messaging to text messaging, the authors create an informative and relevant guidebook that goes beyond description to include developmental theory and implications. Also woven throughout the book is an international sensitivity and understanding that clarifies how, despite the widespread popularity of digital communication, technology use varies between groups globally. Other specific topics addressed include: Sexuality on the Internet. Online identity and self-presentation. Morality, ethics, and civic engagement. Technology and health. Violence, cyberbullying, and victimization. Excessive Internet use and addictive behavior.
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New media, such as Facebook, has implications for romantic relationships, including easing the ability to monitor a partner's activities. Across two studies we demonstrate that in response to feelings of jealousy, women are more likely than men to monitor their partner's activities on Facebook. In Study 1, participants were exposed to one of three experimental conditions meant to provoke jealousy, and their search time on a simulated Facebook environment was recorded. Jealousy predicted more time searching for women, but less for men. In Study 2, a dyadic daily experience study, on days when women (but not men) reported greater jealousy they spent more time monitoring their partner on Facebook, and anxious attachment was one mechanism that explained this association. The results are discussed in terms of gender differences in attachment and response to feelings of jealousy.
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Because the first antistalking statute was enacted in California in 1990, stalking research has been expanded immensely, yet been largely confined to exploring traditional pursuit tactics. This study instead examined the prevalence and correlates of cyberstalking behaviors while examining the phenomenon in a more inclusive manner than previous studies focusing on cyberstalking by including social networking avenues. In addition to a measure assessing cyberstalking-related behaviors, questionnaires assessing pathological aspects of personality, including attachment style, interpersonal jealousy, interpersonal violence, and anger were also provided to participants. Results indicate that, given preliminary evidence, cyberstalking-related behaviors are related to past measures of traditional stalking and cyberstalking, although prior attachment, jealousy, and violence issues within relationships are significant predictors of cyberstalking-related behaviors. In addition, unexpected gender differences emerged. For example, women admitted greater frequencies of cyberstalking perpetration than males, signaling that further research on frequency and motivation for cyberstalking among the sexes is necessary.
Article
The present study aims to investigate the latent structure of a Physical Dating Aggression Scale in Italian and Canadian adolescents and to evaluate the measurement invariance across gender and country. Participants involved 1,628 adolescents (704 Italians and 924 Canadians; 800 males and 828 females) aged 14–16 years. A revised version of the CTS Physical Aggression Scale (Straus, 1979) modified to make the items more acceptable to younger teens was used. Results from Single-Group confirmatory factor analysis supported a monodimensional structure as the most parsimonious index of Physical Dating Aggression. Furthermore, Multiple-Group analyses conducted through different tests (across gender in each country separately, across country in each gender separately, and across country on the whole sample) showed a substantial factorial invariance. Results are discussed in relation to age, gender, and cultural issues on Physical Dating Aggression. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Article
This mixed-methods study describes the norms supporting male-to-female and female-to-male dating violence in a diverse sample of ninth graders. The quantitative study, based on student surveys (n = 624), compared norms supporting dating violence by sex, race/ethnicity, and dating status, and it examined the relation between dating violence norms and physical aggression and victimization. The qualitative study, based on 12 focus groups, explored participants' views of dating aggression. Findings revealed more support for female-to-male aggression, greater acceptance of norms supporting dating violence by non-White students, a strong association between norms and physical aggression but only in males, and a high correlation between victimization and perpetration. Participants rejected male-to-female dating aggression because of peer pressure not to hit girls, parents' beliefs that denounce dating violence, the superior physical advantage of boys over girls, and legal consequences. Results highlight the importance of culturally sensitive and gender-specific interventions.
Adolescent dating violence and electronic aggression are significant public health problems. The purpose of this study was to (a) identify ways in which technology is used in dating violence and (b) present examples of dating violence in which electronic aggression played a salient role. The data set included the transcribed narratives of 56 young adults who had described their adolescent dating violence experiences for an on going study. Eight ways in which technology is used in dating violence were identified using qualitative descriptive methods. The findings indicate that electronic communication technology influences dating violence by redefining boundaries between dating partners.
Article
Our objective was to examine the prevalence and developmental significance of romantic break-ups in adolescence, a relatively unexplored area of study. We examined their occurrence in a sample of 910 adolescents, first noting the frequency of these events across age, gender, and romantic experience, and then analyzing the dissolution explanations provided by a subsample (N=211) who experienced a break-up within the past 6 months. Break-ups were reported by 23% of youth, especially those with extensive romantic experience. Most were described as self-initiated, especially by girls. Using a categorical-content approach, we determined that the majority of dissolution explanations reflected "fit failures" in meeting developmentally salient romantic needs, especially those related to interdependence. Patterns were consistent across gender and age, however, those with romantic experience focused most on unmet intimacy needs. We discuss the developmental significance of break-ups, noting continuity between the needs expressed in intact and dissolving relationships.
Mexican American adolescent couples communicating about confl ict: An integrated developmental and cultural perspective
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Adams Rueda, H., & Williams, L. R. (2016). Mexican American adolescent couples communicating about confl ict: An integrated developmental and cultural perspective. Journal of Adolescent Research, 31(3), 375-403. doi:10.1177/0743558415584999
Sex diff erences in aggression between heterosexual partners: A meta-analytic review
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Archer, J. (2000). Sex diff erences in aggression between heterosexual partners: A meta-analytic review. Psychological Bulletin, 126(5), 651-680. doi:10.1037/0033-2909.126.5.651
Exploring cyber-based dating aggression in adolescent romantic relationships: Past, present and future (Tesis doctoral, University of Calgary, Canadá). Recuperada de
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Attewell, V. D. (2013). Exploring cyber-based dating aggression in adolescent romantic relationships: Past, present and future (Tesis doctoral, University of Calgary, Canadá). Recuperada de http://theses.ucalgary.ca/bitstream/11023/1063/2/ ucalgary_2013_attewell_valerie.pdf
Psychometric properties of the Cyberbullying Questionnaire (cbq) among Mexican adolescents. Violence and Victims
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Gámez-Guadix, M., Villa-George, F., & Calvete, E. (2014). Psychometric properties of the Cyberbullying Questionnaire (cbq) among Mexican adolescents. Violence and Victims, 29(2), 232-247. doi:10.1891/0886-6708.VV-D-1200163R1
Multivariate data analysis. Upper Saddle River
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Hair, J. F., Jr., Black, W. C., Babin, B. J., & Anderson, R. E. (2010). Multivariate data analysis. Upper Saddle River, NJ, E.U.: Pearson Prentice Hall.
Un estudio exploratorio en estudiantes mexicanos de escuelas preparatorias
  • L A Lucio-López
  • M T Prieto-Quezada
Lucio-López, L. A., & Prieto-Quezada, M. T. (2014). Violencia en el ciberespacio en las relaciones de noviazgo adolescente. Un estudio exploratorio en estudiantes mexicanos de escuelas preparatorias. Revista de Educación y Desarrollo, 31, 61-72.
Th e role of social network sites in romantic relationships: Eff ects on jealousy and relationship happiness
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Utz, S., & Beukeboom, C. J. (2011). Th e role of social network sites in romantic relationships: Eff ects on jealousy and relationship happiness. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 16(4), 511-527. doi:10.1111/j.10836101.2011.01552.x
Violencia a través de las tic en estudiantes de secundaria. Rayuela: Revista Iberoamericana sobre Niñez y Juventud en Lucha por sus Derechos
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Velázquez Reyes, L. M. (2012). Violencia a través de las tic en estudiantes de secundaria. Rayuela: Revista Iberoamericana sobre Niñez y Juventud en Lucha por sus Derechos, 3(6), 81-91. Recuperado de http://revistarayuela.ednica.org.mx/ article/violencia-trav%C3%A9s-de-las-tic-en-estudiantesde-secundaria
Technology, teen dating violence and abuse, and bullying. Final report
  • J M Zweig
  • M Dank
  • P Lachman
  • J Yahner
Zweig, J. M., Dank, M., Lachman, P., & Yahner, J. (2013). Technology, teen dating violence and abuse, and bullying. Final report. Washington, DC, E.U.: Urban Institute. Recuperado del sitio de internet del Urban Institute: http://www.urban. org/research/publication/technology-teen-dating-violenceand-abuse-and-bullying Recibido: 25 de junio de 2015. Aceptado: 17 de noviembre de 2016.