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Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership in Learning The role of questioning in writing tutorials: a critical approach to student-centered learning in peer tutorials in higher education

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Abstract

Peer tutoring in higher education aims to enhance student learning, and confidence. In writing centres, peer writing tutors use critical questioning to make the tutorial sessions student-focused and productive. The nature of questions influences the outcomes of the tutorials, yet research has not devoted sufficient time to unpacking what form this questioning takes, and the potential value for students and tutors. This paper explores the kinds of questions asked, the challenges posed to students and tutors, and implications for the learning process. Tutors' experiences during tutorials and their reflections in written reports are used to unpack and explore questioning in tutorials. The paper highlights questioning as relevant in writing centre spaces due to its central role in shaping student learning about writing. The findings have relevance for peer tutoring in higher education generally, and indicate the importance of peer tutors learning to use questions to engage effectively with students.

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... On the other hand, the problem that arises is the effect of New Normal regulation to the implementation of SCL approach in this transitional period of the new order eraboth in the aspects of the curriculum concept and the technical side-is the form of technology-based teaching tools, especially in practicum lesson, such as fiqh. The phenomenon of the SCL approach has an emphasis on the questioning stage (Munje, Nanima, & Clarence, 2018), combining lesson planning with classroom instructional practice (Emaliana, 2017). Nevertheless, As Zairul concluded in his research that technology-based learning is an alternative to the SCL approach that can be implemented through online learning media (Zairul, 2020). ...
... The discussion process was carried out after the students doing the reading process through various strategies, one of which was through the "cloze strategy" (Putri, 2020), Problembased Learning (PBL) models (Widiana, R., Maharani, A.D., & Rowdoh, 2020), or through the implementation of Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) (Rini, S., & Mansur, 2019). Second, through questioning, the tutorial process can be more productive and focused on the target of cognitive competencies development for each student (Munje et al., 2018). ...
... Technically, the discussion session will create sharing activities among forum members (Unin & Bearing, 2016) which can develop the members' knowledge. Second, through questioning, the tutorial process can be more productive and focused on the target of cognitive competencies development for each student (Munje et al., 2018). ...
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... At the core of the consultations that take place in the writing centre space is the art of questioning and clarification as effective tools that aid traditional consultation. This position is, to a great extent, fortified by Munje, Nanima and Clarence (2018) who interrogate the role of questioning in writing centre tutorials. They question how tutors can create a space for student writers to "take ownership of their writing, reflect on the process of creating a piece of writing, and learn about themselves as writers in ways that enable further growth and learning" (Munje et al. 2018: 338). ...
... Central to this study are the following two questions: (i) How does an online writing centre deal with aspects of power, authority, and identity (Mitoumba-Tindy 2017, Munje et al. 2018, Shabanza 2017, Thompson 2009), and (ii) How can the online space operate effectively under circumstances that do not exhibit the characteristics of a physical consultation? Breuch and Racine (2000) identify a few challenges that online centres face, the first being time management in an online tutoring session. ...
... This methodology enhances the arguments and sub-arguments that guide the operation of a writing centre as a physical or an online space, and how it balances power, authority, and identity in the peer-tutor relationship. This methodological process adds to the evaluation the effectiveness of writing centres as they shift from physical (Clarence 2011, Nichols 2017, Munje et al. 2018) to online spaces (Breuch andRacine 2000, Hoon 2009) in the wake of the #FeesMustFall protests. ...
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