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Malaxis biaurita (Lindley) Kuntze (Orchidaceae): a new record for Nepal

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Malaxis biaurita (Lindley) Kuntze (Orchidaceae) has been reported for the first time in Nepal. The species occurs in the subtropical forest at an elevation of 1400 meters. The identifying characters are purple-red flowers, apically entire, obtuse labellum. Detailed description, illustration and relevant notes are provided. Key words: orchids; taxonomy; distribution DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/hjs.v6i8.1804 Himalayan Journal of Sciences Vol.6 Issue 8 2010 pp.41-42
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HIMALAYAN JOURNAL OF SCIENCES VOL 6 ISSUE 8 2010
40
Research paper
brief communication
Malaxis biaurita (Lindley) Kuntze (Orchidaceae):
a new record for Nepal
Bhakta B Raskoti and Rita Ale
Himalayan Journal of Sciences 6(8): 41–42, 2010
doi: 10.3126/hjs.v6i8.1804
Himalayan
JOURNAL OF SCIENCES
HIMALAYAN JOURNAL OF SCIENCES VOL 6 ISSUE 8 2010 41
Brief communication
Malaxis biaurita (Lindley) Kuntze (Orchidaceae):
a new record for Nepal
Bhakta B Raskoti* and Rita Ale
.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Pokharathok 9, Arghakhanchi, NEPAL
* For correspondence, email: bbraskoti@gmail.com
Malaxis biaurita (Lindley) Kuntze (Orchidaceae) has been reported for the rst time in Nepal. The species occurs
in the subtropical forest at an elevation of 1400 meters. The identifying characters are purple-red owers, apically
entire, obtuse labellum. Detailed description, illustration and relevant notes are provided.
Key words: orchids, taxonomy, distribution
The genus Malaxis was established by O Swartze in 1788.
The genus comprises about 300 species worldwide, found
primarily in tropical and subtropical regions of South East
Asia with few species in temperate regions (Pearce and Cribb
2002). Malaxis biaurita (Lindley) Kuntze is distributed in the
subtropical region of the Andaman Islands (Pradhan 1979).
It is also reported in the north-west Himalaya of India (Deva
1982).
Genus Malaxis is represented by ten species in Nepal
(Rajbhandari and Dahal 2004). Malaxis biaurita had not been
previously reported from Nepal (Hara et al. 1978; Banerji and
Pradhan 1984; Press et al. 2000; DPR 2001; Rajbhandari and
Dahal 2004; Rajbhandari and Baral 2010). There is no record
of this species in the National Herbarium, Kathmandu
(KATH) or Tribhuvan University Central Herbarium (TUCH).
Here we report a new record of Malaxis biuarita (Lindley)
Kuntze for Nepal. The rst author collected it in Lamidanda,
Makwanpur District, Narayani Zone (Central Nepal) at an
altitude of 1400 meter and deposited it at KATH.
Malaxis biaurita (Lindley) Kuntze, Gen. Pl. 2: 673. 1891.
Microstylis biaurita Lindley, Gen. Sp. Orchid. Pl. 20. 1830.
Herb, terrestrial, up to 40 cm tall. Stem: eshy, cylindrical,
2–2.5 cm, enclosed in leaf sheaths. Leaves: ascending; petiole
sheath-like, 1.5–3 cm, clasping; leaf blade ovate, oblong-ovate,
or sub-elliptic, 6–12×1.8–4.5 cm, base contracted into a stalk,
apex acute or acuminate. Scape: erect, 14–21 cm, wingless;
raceme 8–10 cm, 20–30 laxly owered. Floral bracts: reexed,
4.5–6 mm, narrowly lanceolate, apex acuminate. Pedicel and
ovary 4–5 mm. Flowers: purplish red, 8 mm across. Abaxial
sepal: oblong-lanceolate, 5–5.5×1.5–2 mm, both margins
revolute, apex obtuse; lateral sepals: narrowly oblong-ovate,
oblique, 6×1.5–2 mm, apex obtuse. Petals: narrowly linear,
5×0.2 mm, apex blunt. Labellum: ovate-lanceolate in outline,
7 mm, both ends tapering, base with two falcate auricles,
apex obtuse. Column: 1 mm thick.
Flowering: July.
Himalayan Journal of Sciences 6(8): 4142, 2010
doi: 10.3126/hjs.v6i8.1804
Copyright©2010 by Himalayan Association for the
Advancement of Science
Figure 1. Malaxis biaurita habit
HIMALAYAN JOURNAL OF SCIENCES VOL 6 ISSUE 8 2010
42
Brief communication
Figure 2 (top on the left). A. Habit of the plant; B.
Front view of ower; C. Back view of ower; D. Side
view of ower; E. Labellum; F. Column; G. Dorsal
sepal; H. Lateral sepal; I. Petal; J. Anther. Sections
of the gure (A to J) are not in the same scale.
Figure 3 (left). Close up view of the ower with
sepals, petals, lip and column visible.
Habitat: Cool growing terrestrial on humus rich
sandy slopes, likes partial shade, occurs in the
subtropical forest margins at an altitude of 1400
meters.
Occurrence: Central Nepal, Narayani Zone,
Makwanpur District, Lamidanda, 25 July 2007,
Raskoti 204 (KATH).
Acknowledgements
We are grateful to the Curators of the National Herbarium
and Plant Laboratories, Godawari, Lalitpur (KATH)
and Tribhuvan University Central Herbarium, Kirtipur,
Kathmandu (TUCH) for allowing us to study herbarium
specimens for comparison.
References
Banerji ML and Pradhan P. 1984. The orchids of Nepal
Himalaya. Vaduz, Germany: J. Cramer. 292p
Deva S. 1982. Malaxis biaurita (Lindl.) – A new record for
North-West Himalaya. Indian Journal of Forestry 5(3):
242–244
DPR 2001. Flowering plants of Nepal (Phanerogams).
Bulletin No. 18. Kathmandu, Nepal: Department of
Plant Resources, His Majesty Government of Nepal.
215 p
Hara H, WT Stearn and LHJ Williams (eds). 1978. An
enumeration of the owering plants of Nepal, Volume-
I. London: British Museum (Natural History). 49 p
Pearce N and P Cribb. 2002. The orchids of Bhutan.
Edinburgh: Royal Botanic Garden. 212 p
Pradhan UC. 1979. Indian orchids: Guide to identication
and culture. Volume II. Kalimpong, West Bengal, India.
209 p
Press JR, KK Shrestha and DA Sutton. 2000. Annotated
checklist of the owering plants of Nepal. London: The
Natural History Museum. 220 p
Rajbhandari KR and SR Baral. 2010. Catalogue of Nepalese
owering plants Gymnosperms and Monocotyledons-
1. Kathmandu: Department of Plant Resources,
National Herbarium and Plant Laboratories/
Government of Nepal
Rajbhandari KR and S Dahal. 2004. Orchids of Nepal: A
checklist. Botanica Orientalis 4(1): 89–106
Article
Full-text available
An annotated checklist comprised of 458 taxa of orchids known from Nepal is provided, including 104 genera, 437 species, 16 varieties, 3 subspecies and 2 forma and 18 endemic species. In Nepal, orchid species are distributed from 60–5200 m a.s.l. In the checklist, notes on altitudinal ranges, habit, habitat, global distribution, phenology, etc. are presented.
Article
Full-text available
An annotated checklist comprised of 458 taxa of orchids known from Nepal is provided, including 104 genera, 437 species, 16 varieties, 3 subspecies and 2 forma and 18 endemic species. In Nepal, orchid species are distributed from 60–5200 m a.s.l. In the checklist, notes on altitudinal ranges, habit, habitat, global distribution, phenology, etc. are presented.
The orchids of Nepal Himalaya
  • Banerji
  • P Pradhan
Banerji ML and Pradhan P. 1984. The orchids of Nepal Himalaya. Vaduz, Germany: J. Cramer. 292p
Malaxis biaurita (Lindl.) -A new record for North-West Himalaya
Deva S. 1982. Malaxis biaurita (Lindl.) -A new record for North-West Himalaya. Indian Journal of Forestry 5(3): 242-244 DPR 2001. Flowering plants of Nepal (Phanerogams). Bulletin No. 18. Kathmandu, Nepal: Department of Plant Resources, His Majesty Government of Nepal. 215 p
Catalogue of Nepalese flowering plants -Gymnosperms and Monocotyledons-1. Kathmandu: Department of Plant Resources, National Herbarium and Plant Laboratories/ Government of Nepal Rajbhandari KR and S Dahal
  • Rajbhandari Kr
  • Baral
Rajbhandari KR and SR Baral. 2010. Catalogue of Nepalese flowering plants -Gymnosperms and Monocotyledons-1. Kathmandu: Department of Plant Resources, National Herbarium and Plant Laboratories/ Government of Nepal Rajbhandari KR and S Dahal. 2004. Orchids of Nepal: A checklist. Botanica Orientalis 4(1): 89-106
An enumeration of the flowering plants of Nepal, Volume-I. London: British Museum (Natural History)
  • H Hara
  • W T Stearn
  • Williams
Hara H, WT Stearn and LHJ Williams (eds). 1978. An enumeration of the flowering plants of Nepal, Volume-I. London: British Museum (Natural History). 49 p