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Author Correction: The effectiveness of public health advertisements to promote health: a randomized-controlled trial on 794,000 participants

Authors:

Abstract

In the original version of the published Article, there was an error in the caption to Table 1 which stated “None of the differences are statistically significant (χ2, two-sided, p > 0.05)”. This has been changed to “The 18–24 year old are over-represented in the all user treatment population, while the 50–64 year old are underrepresented in both tracked and all user population, p-values were <0.05 for age groups and gender.” This has been corrected in the HTML and PDF version of the Article.
AUTHOR CORRECTION OPEN
Author Correction: The effectiveness of public health
advertisements to promote health: a randomized-controlled
trial on 794,000 participants
Elad Yom-Tov
1
, Jinia Shembekar
2
, Sarah Barclay
2
and Peter Muennig
3
npj Digital Medicine (2018) 1:38 ; doi:10.1038/s41746-018-0047-z
Correction to:npj Digital Medicine https://doi.org/10.1038/s41746-
018-0031-7, Published online: 27 June 2018
In the original version of the published Article, there was an
error in the caption to Table 1 which stated None of the
differences are statistically signicant (χ
2
, two-sided, p> 0.05).
This has been changed to The 1824 year old are over-
represented in the all user treatment population, while the
5064 year old are underrepresented in both tracked and all user
population, p-values were <0.05 for age groups and gender.This
has been corrected in the HTML and PDF version of the Article.
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© The Author(s) 2018
1
Microsoft Research Israel, 13 Shenkar st., 46875 Herzeliya, Israel;
2
J. Walter Thompson, 466 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY 10017, USA and
3
Global Research Analytics for
Population Health and the Department of Health Policy and Management, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 722 West 168th St., New York, NY 10032, USA
Correspondence: Elad Yom-Tov (eladyt@microsoft.com)
www.nature.com/npjdigitalmed
Published in partnership with the Scripps Translational Science Institute
... This development has enabled new forms of health communication that are more direct and engaging for users. Social media-based messaging has also led to unprecedented opportunities for optimizing and effectively delivering information to the masses via computationally heavy approaches such as A/B-testing, recommender systems, and targeting receiver characteristics or social network positions [5][6][7][8][9][10]. Social media can diffuse messages widely across the globe and deeply into interpersonal networks [11,12]. ...
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