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Impact of cleanliness on the productivity of employees

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Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the cleanliness of a work environment has influence on the productivity of employees working in office environments of non-profit organizations in The Netherlands. Design/methodology/approach In the study, an online survey (including questions about the perceived cleanliness) and two objective cleanliness assessment methods (particle counts and surface cleanliness) are used. The data are collected using an online questionnaire to determine the workers’ perception (of productivity and cleanliness) and to measure the cleanliness (visual assessment of the surface cleanliness and measured [dust] particle counts in the ambient air) at five different non-profit organizations in The Netherlands. Findings It is found that a higher objective cleanliness correlates significantly with a higher perceived productivity of employees working in office environments of non-profit organizations in The Netherlands. A higher measured cleanliness also correlates significantly with a higher work satisfaction level of employees working in office environments. Finally, a significant correlation is found between the satisfaction of employees with their work as a whole and the perceived productivity of the employees; a higher satisfaction leads to a higher perceived productivity. Research limitations/implications The cleanliness is measured in five non-profit organizations, so it is not possible to draw any strong generalization. Future studies are needed to confirm or contradict the findings in this research. Practical implications The results highlight the aspects of the cleanliness in the office environment that influence the perceived productivity. This concerns the measured cleanliness. Employees evaluate their own productivity lower at a higher level of particle counts in the ambient air in the office environment and when more dirt and stain are found on the surface (lower surface cleanliness). In response to these findings, it is recommended to carry out regular cleaning activities in the office environment where the employees perform their work. Overall, to maintain or achieve maximum personal productivity, a clean office environment is important. Originality/value This research is the first to identify the relationship between perceived productivity and measured cleanliness of the office environment.
... Last, workspace cleanliness might influence employees' distractions, while also influencing their productivity (Horrevorts, van Ophem, and Terpstra 2018). Kim and de Dear (2013) argued that employees in all office types are satisfied with the cleanliness of the workspace, but when sharing a desk with others, the presence of unclean desks may decrease their productivity (Kim et al. 2016). ...
... This indicates that homeworkspace distractions are a strong mediating mechanism between home-workspace characteristics and mental health. Direct relationships were also expected between, amongst others, cleanliness and productivity (Horrevorts, van Ophem, and Terpstra 2018), noise and concentration, and fatigue (Kaarlela-Tuomaala et al. 2009), and temperature and stress (Kim et al. 2018), because these were significant in office-based literature. The relationship between noise and well-being has also previously been found in office-based literature. ...
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Previous research showed that office workers are mainly distracted by noise, influencing their mental health. Little investigation has been done into the influence of other workspace characteristics (i.e., temperature, amount of space, visual privacy, adjustability of furniture, wall colours, and workspace cleanliness) on distractions at the office, and even fewer while working from home (WFH). The influence of home-workspace distractions on mental health also received limited attention. This research aims to investigate relationships between home-workspace and personal characteristics, distraction, and mental health while WFH during COVID-19. A path analysis approach was used, to find that, at home, employees were distracted by noise and when having a small desk. Those with a dedicated workroom were less distracted. Distractions mediated most relationships between home-workspace characteristics and mental health, while personal characteristics influenced mental health directly. Employers can use these results to redesign policies regarding home-and-office working to stimulate a healthy work-environment.
... A positive and encouraging workplace has many positive effects on the employee. According to Horrevorts [28], there is a high correlation between a good and positive workplace to an employee's mindset and productivity. In addition, they stated that a good workplace environment has a significant correlation with employees' satisfaction with their work as a whole which can lead to a more positive outlook towards work. ...
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The shoe industry has been continuously growing in recent years. The goal of this study was to identify factors affecting perceived shoe quality among shoe manufacturing workers. A sample of 350 shoe manufacturing workers participated in answering a survey that was distributed using a purposive sampling approach. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) indicated that quality training was the most significant factor on perceived shoe quality, indicating that quality training should be prioritized and included in company programs to sustain quality products. Interestingly, perceived tooling/machinery conditions, teamwork and cooperation, the operator’s technical skills, and the operator’s quality mindset, also had significant effects on perceived shoe quality. This study is one of the first studies to explore perceived shoe quality among shoe manufacturing workers. The results may convey information for future research on perceived product quality, particularly for the shoe industry. Finally, our framework can be utilized for the enhancement of perceived product quality in shoe manufacturing industries worldwide.
... After introducing the 5S plan, the working area is now fully optimized. Horrevorts et al. [15] highlighted the impact of workplace cleanliness on the productivity of employees. A clean work area can boost employees' morale to do their job and ultimately increase their work performance. ...
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This study aims to assess the 5S approach strategy for SME. 5S in simple terms is a Japanese technique consisting of five ‘S’ terms namely Seiri (sorting), Seiton (set in order), Seiso (shine), Seiketsu (standardize) and Shitsuke (sustain) which is always applied to manage the workplace. In this research, a case study will be steered at the packaging section of Fatt Choi Sdn Bhd Company located in Sabah, Malaysia to gather data for analysis. This paper targets the wastes observed in the packaging section of Fatt Choi Company and systematic elimination of them through 5 stages of 5S. Low space utilization, presence of unnecessary items, lack of proper cleaning schedule, obsolete work rules are the major wastes observed in the workplace. Through the implementation of various steps of 5S, the targeted wastes are eliminated, and better space utilization is achieved. The objectives of this paper are to assess the level of understanding for workers to encounter and adapting 5S systems which would enhance their performance, to evaluate the acceptance rate for employees to implement 5S in their work area as well as to relate the effectiveness of the 5S system in improving the worker performance and reducing unwanted waste in the industry. The researcher is able to assist with the implementation of 5S practices in the SMEs which could benefit their organization from the 5S systems, as well as the problem faced in implementation, factors of implementation and benefits experienced after the adoption of 5S lean manufacturing tools were being identified and evaluated. The results reveal that before the implementation of 5S, the survey scores varies from very poor to satisfactory( scoring from 1-3) related to the level of understanding for workers to encounter and adapting 5S systems, the acceptance rate for employees to implement 5S in their work area as well as the effectiveness of the 5S system in improving the worker performance and reducing unwanted waste in the industry but after the implementation of 5S the scores had changed from good to very good (scoring from 3-5). Survey results show a clear change can be seen before and after the implementation of 5S. The result gets positive result from the survey done by the employees after the implementation of 5S in their working area. Employees are more contented with their work environment after the implementation of 5S. This is due to the cleanliness of their workplace is maintained every day, all items and tools are adequately arranged, and they can finish their work without any delay resulting from time waste searching for tools.
... After introducing the 5S plan, the working area is now fully optimized. Horrevorts et al. [15] highlighted the impact of workplace cleanliness on the productivity of employees. A clean work area can boost employees' morale to do their job and ultimately increase their work performance. ...
Article
Full-text available
This study aims to assess the 5S approach strategy for SME. 5S in simple terms is a Japanese technique consisting of five ‘S’ terms namely Seiri (sorting), Seiton (set in order), Seiso (shine), Seiketsu (standardize) and Shitsuke (sustain) which is always applied to manage the workplace. In this research, a case study will be steered at the packaging section of Fatt Choi Sdn Bhd Company located in Sabah, Malaysia to gather data for analysis. This paper targets the wastes observed in the packaging section of Fatt Choi Company and systematic elimination of them through 5 stages of 5S. Low space utilization, presence of unnecessary items, lack of proper cleaning schedule, obsolete work rules are the major wastes observed in the workplace. Through the implementation of various steps of 5S, the targeted wastes are eliminated, and better space utilization is achieved. The objectives of this paper are to assess the level of understanding for workers to encounter and adapting 5S systems which would enhance their performance, to evaluate the acceptance rate for employees to implement 5S in their work area as well as to relate the effectiveness of the 5S system in improving the worker performance and reducing unwanted waste in the industry. The researcher is able to assist with the implementation of 5S practices in the SMEs which could benefit their organization from the 5S systems, as well as the problem faced in implementation, factors of implementation and benefits experienced after the adoption of 5S lean manufacturing tools were being identified and evaluated. The results reveal that before the implementation of 5S, the survey scores varies from very poor to satisfactory( scoring from 1-3) related to the level of understanding for workers to encounter and adapting 5S systems, the acceptance rate for employees to implement 5S in their work area as well as the effectiveness of the 5S system in improving the worker performance and reducing unwanted waste in the industry but after the implementation of 5S the scores had changed from good to very good (scoring from 3-5). Survey results show a clear change can be seen before and after the implementation of 5S. The result gets positive result from the survey done by the employees after the implementation of 5S in their working area. Employees are more contented with their work environment after the implementation of 5S. This is due to the cleanliness of their workplace is maintained every day, all items and tools are adequately arranged, and they can finish their work without any delay resulting from time waste searching for tools.
... We also found satisfaction with cleanliness to be the most important parameter for overall workspace satisfaction in Singaporean spaces. Previous work has shown workspace cleanliness to have a positive impact on occupant satisfaction with one's office environment and productivity [51]. Psychological research examining the overall concept of "cleanliness" suggests that cleaning behaviours work to eliminate feelings of disgust. ...
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Understanding occupants’ satisfaction with their environment is an important step to improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ). These satisfaction data are limited to Singaporean commercial buildings. We surveyed (N = 666) occupant satisfaction with 18 IEQ parameters in seven Green Mark certified air-conditioned commercial buildings in Singapore. About 78 % of the participants expressed satisfaction with their overall workspace environment. Occupants were most satisfied with flexibility of dress code (86 % satisfaction), electrical lighting (84 %) and cleanliness (82 %), and most dissatisfied with sound privacy (42 % dissatisfaction), personal control (32 %) and temperature (30 %). We found that satisfaction with cleanliness has the highest impact to overall workspace environment satisfaction. Our results suggest achieving high occupant satisfaction for some IEQ factors is harder than others, which suggests the premise of singular satisfaction rating (e.g., 80 %) that applies to all IEQ parameters may not be reliable and representative. We determined that the major contributors to thermal dissatisfaction were insufficient air movement and overcooled workspaces. Occupants in open plan office were unhappy with the noise produced by their nearby colleagues. We also found that several IEQ variables (odors, air movement, available space, overall privacy, sound privacy and temperature) which are not statistically significant to the overall workspace satisfaction on their own, but their impacts becomes substantial when these IEQ variables are merged into larger environmental factors (i.e., Perceived Air Quality, Acoustics, Layout and Thermal). These results can support the development of an IEQ benchmarks for commercial buildings in Singapore.
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The article presents an approach to developing cost-effective interventions for workplace innovations for entrepreneurs who seek to enhance the productivity of an organization. The business case method is used to extend the Q4-model of productivity, which supports developing a productivity strategy in order to choose a cost-effective intervention. The approach offers the opportunity to trade off quantitative factors against qualitative factors; therefore, it is applicable to both profit sectors of industry and nonprofit sectors. The study sets out the steps in the approach and presents two case studies from different industrial sectors (public services and manufacturing) in which the approach has proved applicable. The Q4-model provides practical support to entrepreneurs in their efforts to innovate and improve productivity and is not for measuring the quantity and quality of input and output factors. Entrepreneurs are supported in developing a productivity strategy, combining a mix of quantity and quality input and output factors, and in the transformation of this strategy into a practical intervention. To facilitate the entrepreneurs to choose from different commercial options, the Q4-approach allows for the definition of its business case.
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Purpose – Agenda for Change is the biggest reform of staff pay in the UK National Health Service (NHS) since it began in 1948. As well as introducing a standardised pay structure; it also aims to improve recruitment, retention and staff morale. The aim of this study is to look in‐depth at the experiences and opinions of a range of estates and facilities staff surrounding Agenda for Change during the implementation period. Design/methodology/approach – Focus groups were used as the primary method of data collection in an attempt to tap into the views and opinions of staff working at operational positions in a wide range of trusts. Findings – One of the most important and common themes, which reoccurred throughout the focus groups, was the view that the Agenda for Change framework was designed around the needs of nursing staff. Therefore, the framework did not adequately cater for the needs of estates and facilities staff. Specific concerns related to this included; the role or contribution of estates and facilities staff during patient care was not fairly reflected; trade qualifications were not recognised, particularly in comparison to academic qualifications; members of the job matching panels did not have the appropriate knowledge to make decisions surrounding estates and facilities jobs; nurses were more likely to make progress through the bands than estates and facilities staff. Originality/value – This paper would be of use to NHS estates and facilities managers who are currently implementing Agenda for Change or as a general case study on change management.
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Thesis
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