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Directed Acyclic Graphs, Data-Flow, And Distributed Ledgers

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Directed Acyclic Graphs, Data-Flow, And Distributed Ledgers

Abstract and Figures

Wouldn’t you be surprised, if you find every single issue of all overnight published newspapers in your postbox early in the morning, including your favorite one subscribed recently. And anonymous readers build a consensus, whether the issue in your hand is manipulated or not. At day one of your subscription, archives are delivered, too. The analogy is not farfetched, if you consider the published material on “Blockchain” [1], the “distributed ledger technology”, the backbone of Bitcoin. In reality, Blockchain is a journal, a daybook of economic transactions, cloned on every participating node in the network. It is for sure immutable, and extensible. It is neither distributed (its copies are broadcasted as is), nor it is a “ledger”. Inspired by Blockchain, other approaches like “Tangle” (the backbone of IOTA cryptocurrency [2]) even link unrelated (from data-flow point of view) transactions. The system proposed in this paper is a value transfer system with its distributed, decentralized, immutable, and extensible ledgers. It leans on the principles of real existing transaction recording systems (double-entry bookkeeping), which make use of ledgers. These systems are distributed. They are decentralized, if the artificial requirement for trusted parties, who are privileged to assign Ids to individual accounts, are removed. They are immutable, and for sure extensible. Fraud is only possible at the cost of very heavy crime. The introduced system includes a process to prove ownership of accounts, making a central authority superfluous. Immutability is guaranteed by allowing “append” as the only operation to modify a ledger
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Directed Acyclic Graphs, Data-Flow,
And Distributed Ledgers
Enis Olgac
1
Wouldn’t you be surprised, if you find every single issue of all overnight published newspapers in your postbox early in the
morning, including your favorite one subscribed recently. And anonymous readers build a consensus, whether the issue in
your hand is manipulated or not. At day one of your subscription, archives are delivered, too. The analogy is not farfetched,
if you consider the published material on “Blockchain” [1], the “distributed ledger technology”, the backbone of Bitcoin. In
reality, Blockchain is a journal, a daybook of economic transactions, cloned on every participating node in the network. It
is for sure immutable, and extensible. It is neither distributed (its copies are broadcasted as is), nor it is a “ledger”. Inspired
by Blockchain, other approaches like “Tangle” (the backbone of IOTA cryptocurrency [2]) even link unrelated (from
data-flow point of view) transactions.
The system proposed in this paper is a value transfer system with its distributed, decentralized, immutable, and extensible
ledgers. It leans on the principles of real existing transaction recording systems (double-entry bookkeeping), which make
use of ledgers. These systems are distributed. They are decentralized, if the artificial requirement for trusted parties, who
are privileged to assign Ids to individual accounts, are removed. They are immutable, and for sure extensible. Fraud is only
possible at the cost of very heavy crime. The introduced system includes a process to prove ownership of accounts, making
a central authority superfluous. Immutability is guaranteed by allowing “append” as the only operation to modify a ledger.
INTRODUCTION
Ledger is a term related to general accounting and is defined as
“Collection of (an entire group of similar) accounts in double-entry bookkeeping. Also called book of
final entry, a ledger records classified and summarized financial information from journals (the
‘books of first entry’) as debits and credits, and shows their current balances … In computerized
systems, it consists of interlinked digital files, but fallows the same accounting principles as the
manual system.” Source: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/ledger.html.
furthermore double-entry bookkeeping is defined as
System of keeping accounting records that recognizes the dual nature (source and disposition) of
every financial transaction expressed by the basic accounting equation In this system, every
transaction is entered twice in the account books; first, to record a change in the assets' side (called a
'debit') and second, to mirror that change in the equities' side (called a 'credit'). If all entries are
recorded accurately, the account books will 'balance' because the total of debit entries will equal the
total of credit entries.” Source: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/double-entry-
bookkeeping.html
Only those systems which comply with these definitions can be called “Ledger Technology”.
Decentralized Ledgers
Fraud, especially attempts to “Double Spend”, i.e. creating a transfer order without having enough assets to
support the intended value, is unavoidable. In order to identify such improper use, Blockchain as well as
1
MailTo: enis@digraphs.info
Enis Olgac
2
Tangle rely on accessibility of a local copy of their data-structure on every node. This approach has two
intrinsic disadvantages:
1. Enormous increase in storage requirement, as the number of participants and transactions are increasing.
2. Keeping the copies synchronized is not guaranteed without additional effort. Very complex and error
prone procedures need to be introduced in order to mitigate this disadvantage. Even after their
implementation, there is a risk that the desired synchronization can never be achieved. Therefor some
drastic measures like; still standing, taking a snapshot, and restarting the system are taken into
consideration. The fact that every participating node has a different perception (or view) of the system, is
the main reason why double-spending is possible at all. The necessity for consensus building is a
consequence of this deficiency.
Nevertheless, synchronization is inevitable to keep the system well-behaved. In order to accomplish this task
some participants are assumed to undertake operations which are only reserved for them. The privileged role
of these make the system centralized around them. This is true for “Bitcoin” as well as for “IOTA”. The term
“decentralized”, means all operations are allowed for all participants without any exceptions.
On the definition of “decentralized
The term “decentralized” cannot be defined in general, because it depends always on the context of usage.
Back to the analogy, the newspaper is decentralized with respect to reading it, but not with respect to
choosing its contents. Another example is elections. Not everyone may vote due to rules and regulations, but
for those who are eligible voting is decentralized. As a working definition one can assert that
“decentralization” is a matter of purpose, allowed operations, and participating entities. Therefore, the context
should be specified explicitly, if it is not self-explanatory.
On the definition of “distributed”
The term “distributed” in context of distributed computing is defined as
A distributed system is a model in which components located on networked computers
communicate and coordinate their actions by passing messages. The components interact with each
other in order to achieve a common goal … In distributed computing, a problem is divided into many
tasks, each of which is solved by one or more computers.” Source: Distributed Computing -
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distributed_computing.
Only those systems which implement “Ledger Technology” and comply with the above definition can be
called “Distributed Ledger Technology”.
Value Transfer Using Distributed Ledgers
In the next sections we describe a system which uses “distributed ledgers” for value transfer. First, we define
terms which are going to be used due course.
DEFINITION OF TERMS
Account
Account is a container which includes:
An end-balance of the account
An archive, a dictionary of all transactions which are related to the account
A ledger
A dictionary of all edges which link transactions of the account to each other
Enis Olgac
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The private part of a public-key schema determines the account owner and is used to sign payment-orders.
The public part of the same schema is used as a generally available identifier for the account. The account is
assumed to be reachable over HTTP with an address of the form “public-key @ hostname”.
End-balance
End-balance is the balance of the account after the transfer is completed.
Transaction
Transaction is the manifestation of a value transfer order. The order is from sender to receiver and
characterizes always a “payment”. The layout of a transaction is given in Figure 1.
Elements of a Transaction
Transaction-ID
Hash value of the transaction, over Sender ID, Sender Index, Signature of Sender, Value, Receiver ID,
Receiver Index, Signature of Receiver.
Sender-ID
ID (Public-key) of the sending account.
Sender-Index
Zero-based index of the transaction within sender’s ledger.
Signature (~) of the Sender
Signature of the sending account.
Value
Amount to be transferred.
Figure 1 Layout of a Transaction
Receiver-ID
ID (Public-key) of the receiving account.
Receiver-Index
Zero-based index of the transaction within receiver’s ledger.
Signature (~) of the Receiver
Signature of the receiving account.
Ledger
Ledger is a double-linked list of edges. Only those transactions which reference the account as either a sender
or a receiver are attached to the ledger. “Append” is the only operation allowed on the ledger. Other
operations like “Delete”, “Insert”, and “Update” are considered invalid.
Edge
Edge is a tuple of two consecutive transactions related to an account, where edge-ID is the hash value over
IDs of the linked transactions.
Figure 2 Layout of an Edge
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A WORLD FREE OF FRAUD
Although dreaming of a fraud free world is unrealistic, doing so can help understanding the minimum
requirements of a value transfer system. Assume a sender transferring an amount X of a value to a receiver.
Both parties agree that this is a legally binding transaction via a secured note and they keep a copy of the
document.
Transferring a Value
1. Sender builds the transfer request:
a. Sender-ID
b. Sender-Index
c. Value
d. Receiver-ID
2. Sender signs the transaction over Sender-ID, Sender-Index, Value and Receiver-ID.
3. Sender sends the transaction to Receiver.
4. Receiver fills Receiver-Index.
5. Receiver signs the transaction over Receiver-ID, Receiver-Index, Value, and Sender-ID.
6. Receiver calculates the transaction-ID and completes the transaction.
7. Receiver sends the transaction to Sender.
8. Receiver updates its end-balance and appends the transaction to its ledger.
9. Sender updates its end-balance and appends the transaction to its ledger.
After these steps, value transfer is completed, and sender as well as receiver recorded a copy of the transaction
in their ledger for auditing purposes.
FRAUD PREVENTION
Transactions defined in the previous section contain already some measures against fraud. Signing parts of a
transaction guarantees the validity of its contents:
“A valid digital signature gives a recipient reason to believe that the message was created by a known
sender (authentication), that the sender cannot deny having sent the message (non-repudiation), and
that the message was not altered in transit (integrity).” Source: Digital Signature -
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_signature
A fraudulent account can try to cheat with uncovered spending, or not updating its end-balance. Even not
updating the ledger could lead to inconsistencies. There are ways and means to detect such attempts, but it is
very inefficient to suspect misconduct at all times. Transactions of a sample value transfer system with
accounts “Gen”, “B”, “This”, and “That” are shown in Figure 3. Because the transactions are well protected, i.e.
none of the fields of a transaction can ever be changed without invalidating it, ledgers are the only objects of
the system which are subject to fraud. A very efficient solution would be introducing a notary. Not a trusted
third party, but a piece of trusted code which realizes several services as detailed in the extended definition of
terms:
Notary
Notary is a signed code, which embodies following responsibilities:
Checking whether the account has sufficient assets to support the intended value of transfer
Computing the transaction-Id of the current transaction
Creating an edge, a tuple which links the last transaction on the ledger and the transaction at hand
Signing the edge and appending it to ledger
Updating and signing end-balance
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Figure 3 Archive of the Sample.
Fraud Proof Transfer of Value
There are only a few steps necessary to transfer value in a well-behaved manner within the system. The
transfer procedure described earlier is modified and the modifications are underlined:
1. Sender builds the transfer request:
a. Sender-ID
b. Sender-Index
c. Value Receiver-ID
2. Sender signs the transaction over Sender-ID, Sender-Index, Value and Receiver-ID.
3. Sender sends the transaction to Sender-Notary.
4. Sender-Notary validates value and Sender-Index; rejects or sends the request to Receiver-Notary.
5. Receiver-Notary validates request; rejects or sends request to Receiver.
6. Receiver fills Receiver-Index.
7. Receiver signs the transaction over Sender-ID, Value, Receiver-ID, Receiver-Index
8. Receiver sends the transaction to Receiver-Notary.
9. Receiver-Notary validates Receiver-Index; rejects or calculates the transaction-ID and completes the
transaction.
10. Receiver-Notary updates and signs the Receivers End-Balance.
11. Receiver-Notary creates a new edge and appends the edge to Receivers-Ledger.
12. Receiver-Notary adds the transaction to Receivers archive.
13. Receiver-Notary sends the transaction to Senders-Notary.
14. Sender-Notary updates and signs the Senders End-Balance.
15. Sender-Notary creates a new edge and appends the edge to Senders-Ledger.
16. Sender-Notary adds the transaction to Senders archive.
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Network
There are no special presumptions regarding the networking environment. Any platform supporting String
based messaging would be sufficient. Public-keys can be used to identify particular accounts and to build
addresses of the form “public-key @ hostname”.
Ledgers
As indicated in Figure 3 transactions are stored as individual objects which do not contain any linkage
information. They are stored in a key-value dictionary where the key is the transaction-ID, and the value is
the transaction. It is assumed that the “Append” operation of the dictionary checks the validity of the key-
value pair, i.e. the hash value of the transaction is equal to transaction-ID. The key-value pair is immutable.
Changing the content of the value would change its hash, which is its key. So, the resulting key-value pair
would be another unique transaction.
Figure 4 Ledgers of the Sample
It should also be mentioned that “Gen” is the only account where value is generated. It can either have an
unlimited negative balance or it will be initiated with a positive balance at the beginning. Figure 4 shows the
ledgers constituting the sample system. Each transaction in the system appears exactly in two ledgers. This is
the first principle of double-entry bookkeeping which we lean on. Each ledger is an ordered-list of
transactions related to an account. As already mentioned, the links between transactions are maintained in an
explicit edge-set, for which “append” is the only allowed operation. Therefore, not only the content of
transactions is immutable, but also their order.
Merging Ledgers
There may be occasions where one would like to have a consolidated view of interactions between several
accounts, e.g. general ledger of a company. As every transaction, and every account in the system is uniquely
identifiable, different ledgers can be merged into one directed acyclic graph (dag for short). Thereby the merge
operation obeys the principle “same means same”, which is crucial for the semantic of dags. The merged
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ledger in Figure 5 shows the subgraph induced by accounts “This” and “That”, in this case it is the complete
dag modeling the system, the General Ledger.
Figure 5 General Ledger of the Sample
There are many topological orders which can be associated with the shown dag, but only one of them
corresponds to the claim “as soon as possible, but as late as necessary”, which at the same time states the
topological order of dag according to its data-flow. In order to satisfy the claim, transactions must be ordered in
such a way that they succeed those they depend on as soon as possible. At the same time, they should be
postponed as long as the transactions they depend on are not listed. This order is shown in Figure 6.
Figure 6 Topological Order of the Transactions of the Sample
The sum of the end-balances of the accounts in the system is zero after the transactions are executed. This is
the second principle of general accounting we lean on.
GENERALIZED LEDGERS
In the previous sections we discussed “value transfer” within the framework of general accounting. The scope
can be extended to execute and record arbitrary transactions without modifying the process. But care is in
order; any generalization should not sacrifice the two main principles of being a ledger (an ordered list of
transactions), by no means. These principles are:
1. One ledger per account, and one account per ledger
2. Preserving the relative order of entries as they occurred
Otherwise the resulting data-structures would be anything but a ledger (see [1], [2], and [3]). Merely updating
definition of some terms is sufficient to accommodate this expansion.
End-Balance
replaced by
Document
We will allow end-balance to contain arbitrary Strings and change its name to document, reflecting this
change. Document then is an up-to-date version of a String of characters with arbitrary content.
Value in a Transaction
Value is a String of characters which substantiates the semantics of a change request to the document. In the
context of general accounting this could be “Add XXX to document where document represents the
total-balance of the account. In a more general context, it could be an agreement, a contract between two
parties. It could be a full or partial document, an executable script or any arbitrary string. The only
Enis Olgac
8
requirement is that it must be interpretable by notary. Notary then can take necessary actions in order to
correctly update the document.
Notary
Responsibilities of the notary has to be adjusted accordingly:
Validating value
If valid; taking the necessary actions to update the document
CONCLUSION
We described a system to interchange arbitrary transactions between senders (initiators) and receivers. The
key features of this system are:
Peer-to-peer interaction in absence of a trusted third party (Notary is not an independent third party, it is
just signed code)
Preserving anonymity with proof of ownership
Preserving the relative order of transactions as they occurred
Keeping book of all transactions of an account, and only of that account, in a ledger unique to that
account
Ability to check whether the system is balance or not, before and after every transaction
Immutable archive of the transactions of the account
Immutable ledger of the account
Unlimited horizontal growth, the number of participating accounts
Unlimited vertical growth, extensibility of the ledger
Besides these features, subgraphs induced by any combination of accounts can be merged into one subgraph
to have a complete view of their interactions (see Figure 5), while respecting relative order and data-flow of
transactions. The system exhibits the behavior that for each transaction recorded in an account the same
transaction is also recorded in a counter account (see Figure 3). As a result, the systemwide balance can be
checked due course. The system is also flexible enough to execute arbitrary transactions. From simple amount,
to complex logic realized as an executable script.
If the mission is to manage execution and recording of transactions in an accountable manner, the proposed
solution should be the preferred choice.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The author would like to thank Cem Çimenbiçer for his invaluable comments and recommendations.
REFERENCES
[1]
S. Nakamoto, "Bitcoin: A Peer-To-Peer Electronic Cash System", 31 October 2008. [Online]. Available:
http://nakamotoinstitute.org/bitcoin/.
[2]
S. Popov, "The Tangle", 1 October 2017. [Online]. Available: https://iota.org/IOTA_Whitepaper.pdf .
[3]
Xavier Boyen, Christopher Carr, Thomas Haines , "Blockchain-Free Cryptocurrencies", 2017. [Online].
Available: https://eprint.iacr.org/2016/871.pdf .
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Article
A purely peer-to-peer version of electronic cash would allow online payments to be sent directly from one party to another without going through a financial institution. Digital signatures provide part of the solution, but the main benefits are lost if a trusted third party is still required to prevent double-spending. We propose a solution to the double-spending problem using a peer-to-peer network. The network timestamps transactions by hashing them into an ongoing chain of hash-based proof-of-work, forming a record that cannot be changed without redoing the proof-of-work. The longest chain not only serves as proof of the sequence of events witnessed, but proof that it came from the largest pool of CPU power. As long as a majority of CPU power is controlled by nodes that are not cooperating to attack the network, they'll generate the longest chain and outpace attackers. The network itself requires minimal structure. Messages are broadcast on a best effort basis, and nodes can leave and rejoin the network at will, accepting the longest proof-of-work chain as proof of what happened while they were gone.
Blockchain-Free Cryptocurrencies
  • Xavier Boyen
  • Christopher Carr
  • Thomas Haines
Xavier Boyen, Christopher Carr, Thomas Haines, "Blockchain-Free Cryptocurrencies", 2017. [Online].