Article

Effect of a dietary supplement containing porcine placenta extract on skin hydration: A placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, clinical study

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a dietary supplement containing porcine placenta on skin hydration. Methods The study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, clinical trial. Forty-five healthy subjects without skin problems or diseases were enrolled and randomly divided into three groups who were respectively given a placebo, a dietary supplement containing porcine placenta extract (DSPPE), and a dietary supplement containing a vitamin (DSV) group. The subjects were given three capsules daily (including porcine placenta extract (containing 600 jug of Glycyl-L-Leucine (Gly-Leu) +L-Leucyl-Glycine (Leu-Gly) dipeptides)) for eight weeks. Skin hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were evaluated using Corneometer CM 825 and Tewameter TM300® devices. A quality-of-life (QOL) questionnaire and blood samples were tested to assess the safety of the test product. This study was registered in UMIN-CTR (UMIN 000026030). Results There was a statistically significant difference in skin hydration levels after eight weeks on the cheek (P<0.05) and arm (P<0.01) between the placebo and the DSPPE groups. A significant increase was observed on the arm after eight weeks of DSPPE ingestion compared to that before ingestion (P<0.01). Moreover, TEWL data showed a tendency to decrease after four weeks and eight weeks of ingestion in the DSPPE intervention group from the cheek. The results of the blood test and the QOL questionnaire did not show any health risks from the use of these test supplements. No additional adverse events occurred. Conclusions These results suggest that the ingestion of DSPPE has the potential to improve skin hydration and skin conditions in healthy subjects.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... In a recent randomized double-blind clinical trial on the effects of porcine placenta extract in 45 Japanese healthy subjects conducted from February to April, basal skin hydration levels of arm and Dchange after 8 weeks of intake were 22.07 AE 6.23 and À2.48 AE 1.28 in the placebo group while 19.19 AE 6.32 and 3.38 AE 0.81 in the placenta group, respectively. 24 Basal TEWL level in another study with eight healthy controls (10.2 AE 2.56) was also similar to that in the current study. ...
Article
Full-text available
Daily oral intake of 40 μg Aloe sterol was shown in a double‐blind clinical trial to significantly increase skin barrier function, moisture and elasticity. Ultrasonographic results also suggested that the intake of Aloe sterol increases collagen content in the dermis. Here, we evaluate the effects of a much smaller dose of Aloe sterol, approximately half that used previously, on skin functions in more detail. This is a monocentric, double‐blind, randomized, placebo‐controlled, supplementation study of the effects of low‐dose Aloe sterol on skin transepidermal water loss, hydration, collagen score, evaluation of objective or subjective symptoms, and safety after 12 weeks of daily intake. We randomly administrated either Aloe sterol or placebo to 122 healthy volunteers. Transepidermal water loss was significantly reduced and collagen score was increased in the Aloe sterol group compared with the placebo group at week 12. In the Aloe sterol group, there was significant improvement of objective skin condition (face erythema and pruritus of inner and outer arms) at week 12 compared with week 0, but not in the placebo group. Subjectively, there was significant improvement of visual analog scale of skin acne, fingernail brittleness and constipation in the Aloe sterol group. According to subgroup analysis, although not planned before the study initiation, subjects with dry skin in the Aloe sterol group had significantly increased skin hydration values at week 12 compared with the placebo group. Our results confirmed that even low‐dose Aloe sterol ingestion improves skin moisture by promoting skin barrier function and dermal collagen production, which contributes to maintenance of healthy skin.
... It was reported that food components (e.g., collagen peptide, placenta, and HA) function to maintain normal skin conditions, such as stratum corneum water content. However, evidence from randomized, placebo-controlled trials investigating anti-wrinkle therapy did not clearly demonstrate significant improvement in wrinkles by food materials other than HA [9][10][11]. Thus far, multiple skin-moisturizing or anti-wrinkle functions of oral HA ingestion have been reported. ...
Article
Full-text available
Hyaluronan (HA) is present in all connective tissues and organs, including the skin and joint fluid. However, few clinical trials have comprehensively evaluated the impacts of oral HA on skin conditions, including wrinkles and moisturization. In this study, we conducted a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind trial of daily HA (120 mg) intake for 12 weeks in 40 healthy Asian men and women (aged 35–64 years). Skin condition was determined by the evaluation of wrinkles, stratum corneum water content, the amount of transepidermal water loss, elasticity, and through image analysis. After 12 weeks, skin condition was significantly improved in terms of wrinkle assessment, stratum corneum water content, transepidermal water loss, and elasticity in the HA group compared to the placebo group. Regarding the percentage change from baseline, wrinkle assessment, stratum corneum water content, and skin elasticity were significantly improved in the HA group versus the placebo group after 8 and 12 weeks of ingestion. The present findings indicate that oral ingestion of HA may suppress wrinkles and improve skin condition.
Article
Full-text available
Background: The dietary supplement industry offers many oral cosmetics that purportedly assist in skin moisturization often with unclear evidence supporting efficacy and safety. To update the accessible proofs pertaining to the safety and effectiveness of oral dietary supplements to facilitate skin moisturizing via an all-around review and meta-analysis. Methods: Three on-line databases [Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane Library (CENTRAL)] were retrieved from January 2000 to November 2021. An overall 66 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of skin care were recognized. Meta-analysis was performed for dietary supplements with four or more available research. Results: Oral collagen or ceramide resulted in a statistically significant increase in skin hydration and a decrease in transepidermal water loss (TEWL) compared to placebo. No benefits regarding the improvement of skin conditions in terms of water content and TEWL were observed for lactic acid bacteria or Lactobacillus fermented foods. A statistically significant and positive effect on skin hydration was observed for both hyaluronan and procyanidin, with an unknown effect on TEWL due to insufficient RCTs. There was a non-significant improvement in the water content of stratum corneum for astaxanthin based on subgroup analyses. Among the dietary supplements trialed in ≤ 3 RCTs, the judgment regarding their effects on skin moisturizing was prevented by inconsistent conclusions as well as insufficient research. All food supplements were safe throughout the research (normally ≤ 24 weeks). Conclusion: Oral dietary supplements, including collagen, ceramides, hyaluronan, and procyanidin, were proven to be effective for skin moisturization. At present, for skin moisturization, the proofs supporting the recommendation of other dietary supplements, such as lactic acid bacteria and astaxanthin, are insufficient. Systematic review registration: http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/ identifier CRD42021290818.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.