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Abstract

Introduces the special issue of Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice , which aims to showcase how behavior analysts are leveraging technology to optimize research and practice, disseminate behavior analysis, and extend the reach of behavioral services. Readers of the four papers in this issue are asked to consider new avenues through which technology can assist in advancing behavior analysis and to consider how behavior analysis can reveal its full powers, as the scientific study of principles of learning and behavior, by helping advance the current technology.
Technology and Behavior Analysis: The Past and Potential Future
Introduces the special issue of Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice, which aims to
showcase how behavior analysts are leveraging technology to optimize research and practice,
disseminate behavior analysis, and extend the reach of behavioral services. Readers of the four
papers in this issue are asked to consider new avenues through which technology can assist in
advancing behavior analysis and to consider how behavior analysis can reveal its full powers, as
the scientific study of principles of learning and behavior, by helping advance the current
technology.
Authors: Ellie Kazemi and Victor Ramirez
Published: Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice. August 2018; DOI: 10.1037/bar0000137
To access the article, please visit the following link:
http://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/2018-37707-001.pdf
To access the journal site, please visit the following link:
http://psycnet.apa.org/PsycARTICLES/journal/bar/18/3
... Advances in recording software and instrumentation may be one strategy that assists care providers with data acquisition, summary, storage, display, and communication (Kazemi & Ramirez, 2018;Luiselli & Fischer, 2016;Yanagita et al., 2016). Various systems exist for monitoring health indicators such as sleep (Shlesinger et al., 2020) and seizures (diary.epilepsy.com) ...
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Emerging technologies and behavioural cusps: A new era for behaviour analysis?
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