Article

Possibility to Strengthen the Joint between a Titanium Alloy and Stainless Steel Formed by Diffusion Welding through an Interlayer

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Abstract

The mechanical properties and the fracture of the joints between a PT3V titanium alloy and 12Cr18Ni10T stainless steel formed by diffusion welding through ultrafine-grained layers of nickel and a Cr2Ni98 alloy are studied. The highest strength of the joint (about 390 MPa) is achieved upon welding at T = 700°C, 20 min irrespective of the interlayer material. However, in the case of the nickel interlayer, fracture occurs in the regions adjacent to the TiNi layer; in the case of the Cr2Ni98 alloy, along the alloy/steel interface.

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  • B G Livshits
  • V S Kraposhin
  • Ya L Linetskii
B. G. Livshits, V. S. Kraposhin, and Ya. L. Linetskii, Physical Properties of Metals and Alloys (Metallurgiya, Moscow, 1980).