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The effects of different warm-up protocols on bench press 1RM performance in sprint kayakers

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In order to investigate the effects of different warm-up conditions on one repetition maximum (1RM) bench press performance, eleven highly trained male sprint kayakers completed 1RM bench press tests after 4 different general warm-up condition with a standardized bench press specific warm-up. The workloads of the warm-up protocols were individually designed according to the results of the incremental maximal kayak ergometer test that applied initially. The duration of the protocols were fixed as 15 min for each participant, but there were differences in the intensity of the warm-up. In data analysis, lactate, heart rate, rating of perceived exertion and bench press 1 RM results were dependent variables and differences in these variables were compared using a linear mixed model analysis. A probability level of 0.05 was established to determine statistical significance. As a conclusion, employing low intensity warm-up with five supramaximal sprints substantially improved 1RM bench press performance compared to other warm-up protocols. The suggested warm-up consisted of 15 minutes of low intensity (40% of VO2Max) kayak ergometer paddling with five supramaximal sprints that lasts 10 seconds at the intensity of 200 % of VO2Max, in the last 5 minutes of the paddling.
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... 32 Body fat has been associated with poorer performances as race distance increases, 2 while low adiposity values are advantageous in decreasing the total weight and, therefore, the wetted area of the hull and friction drag. 6 14,21,[35][36][37][38] cicloergometri, 39,40 cicloergometro per braccia, 11,15,38,41,42 ergometri canoa 39,43,44 , ergometri kayak 2,11,13,17,25,26,29,34,35,39,[43][44][45][46][47][48][49][50][51][52][53][54][55][56][57][58][59] e test in acqua. 22,35,38,60 Tuttavia, l'allenamento della parte superiore del corpo con la pagaia induce cambiamenti nel rapporto braccio-gamba dei parametri fisiologici a regime di lavoro submassimale e massimale, di conseguenza testare il lavoro esercitato dalle gambe in canoisti e kayaker non può fornire informazioni affidabili sulla loro potenza aerobica e sulle risposte cardiovascolari. ...
... 71 La principale fonte di energia dei pagaiatori proviene dal sistema aerobico, dal momento che questi trascorrono la maggior parte del tempo di gara nell'intorno del valore di VO 2peak . 29 15,17,22,25,26,34,40,42,48,51,52,55,57,63,73 e fem-ties through the years such as treadmills, 14,21,[35][36][37][38] cycle ergometers, 39,40 arm crankers, 11,15,38,41,42 canoe 39,43,44 or kayak ergometers 2,11,13,17,25,26,29,34,35,39,[43][44][45][46][47][48][49][50][51][52][53][54][55][56][57][58][59] and on-water tests. 22,35,38,60 However, paddling upper-body training induces changes in the arm-to-leg ratio of physiological parameters at submaximal and maximal work, so testing canoeists and kayakers by leg work cannot provide reliable information about their aerobic power and cardiovascular responses. ...
... La forza e la potenza muscolare hanno un impatto importante sul rendimento dei pagaiatori d'acqua piatta, I quali mostrano valori elevati per quanto concerne la forza muscolare della parte superiore del corpo. 3,12,26,35,45,58,92,95,96 Pertanto, migliorare la forza della parte superiore del corpo dovrebbe rappresentare un obiettivo essenziale per i pagaiatori, nell'ottica di ottenere migliori prestazioni in acqua. 3 I pagaiatori dovrebbero essere in grado di raggiungere buoni livelli di potenza durante la pagaiata e negli esercizi di velocità-forza, essendo questi particolarmente importanti alle intensità di soglia caratteristiche del gesto atletico della pagaiata. ...
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