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Making the Move: Supporting Faculty in the Transition to Blended or Online Courses

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This paper is intended for new faculty and faculty who are new to using digital technologies and a learning management system in their instruction. As experienced faculty in the College of Education, the authors make a concerted effort to support faculty in their use of instructional technology. In this paper, the authors share their experiences with faculty who are taking early the early steps in the journey to integrate digital technologies into their instruction. The authors hope this article will help faculty on their journey by supporting them in teaching with technology. The authors focus on faculty development, adoption of new technologies into faculties' instructional practices, and introductory online teaching practices. The authors ' ultimate goal is to support student learning by helping faculty encourage learning for the entire continuum of students: Students who need to be supported as they develop digital literacy and those who come to us embracing technologies wholeheartedly.

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