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Vrikshayurveda: Sustainable Farming and Herbal Health Care

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Abstract

India is an agriculture-based country where population mainly depends upon agricultural practices for their survival. The indiscriminate use of chemicals as fertilizers and controlling agents over last few decades has resulted in multifarious ecological and health problems. Vrikshayurveda, the ancient Indian science which advocates use of plants and their extracts for controlling the infection of soil and plants for obtaining better yield has been ignored with our greed in various ways. Surapala’s Vrikshayurveda is the first full-fledged available text for arbori-horticulture which deals with various aspects of plant’s life, including practices like seed selection, sowing, and manuring etc. Kunapjala suggested as manure in Vrikshayurveda is a direction towards the use of organic manure. Results of some organic practices have suggested that traditional and biological methods of farming can be very useful in improving the soil quality and plant yield. Vrikshayurveda can also help to resolve the current problem of malnutrition and deteriorated soil quality by soil remediation and improving nutrient availability to plants. Thus to utilize the traditional knowledge with blend of advanced scientific interventions and present-day practices are the urgent necessities of present time for environment management, increasing crop yield and to lead a health life.

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