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Using CNN deep learning to learn about fMRI data. Very impressive results.
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... Suhaimi et al. [20] came up with feature map size selection on functional MRI (fMRI) and MRI images dataset and concluded that feature map size selection is an integral part of designing CNN for fMRI classification. Moreover, a study by Saleh et al. [21] used agency system classification brain tumors. ...
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... Ullah et al. (2018) suggested a method for MRI classification using K-NN and obtained astounding accuracy. Suhaimi and Htike (2018) (Maniar and Shah, 2017). In the proposed method they have used data pre-processing technique and images for the classifier improvement. ...
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