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Touch and see: Physical interactions stimulating patterns in artificial cephalopod skin

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... These works discovered that eyes and skin have the same structure [64] and can detect light intensity, and change the colour according to light changings [65]. The results of the genome studies enables the creation of artificial skin and skin-cells with all appropriate features [66], [67], [68]. ...
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Octopus is an invertebrate belonging to the class of Cephalopoda. The body of an Octopus lacks any morphological joints and rigid parts. Their arms, skin and the complex nervous system are investigated by a several researchers all over the world. Octopuses are the object of inspiration for my scientists in different areas, including AI. Soft- and hardware are developed based on octopus features. Soft-robotics octopus-inspired arms are the most common type of developments. There are a lot of different variants of this solution, each of them is different from the other. In this paper, we describe the most remarkable octopus features, show solutions inspired by octopus and provide new ideas for further work and investigations in combination of AI and bioinspired soft-robotics areas.
... These works discovered that eyes and skin have the same structure [64] and can detect light intensity, and change the colour according to light changings [65]. The results of the genome studies enables the creation of artificial skin and skin-cells with all appropriate features [66], [67], [68]. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Octopus is an invertebrate belonging to the class of Cephalopoda. The body of an Octopus lacks any morphological joints and rigid parts. Their arms, skin and the complex nervous system are investigated by a several researchers all over the world. Octopuses are the object of inspiration for my scientists in different areas, including AI. Soft- and hardware are developed based on octopus features. Soft-robotics octopus-inspired arms are the most common type of developments. There are a lot of different variants of this solution, each of them is different from the other. In this paper, we describe the most remarkable octopus features, show solutions inspired by octopus and provide new ideas for further work and investigations in combination of AI and bioinspired soft-robotics areas.
... In practice, this means many researchers working with VHB DEAs are still reliant on applying electrodes by hand [27], [28]. AJP provides contactless technique to overcome this challenge as it can provide consistent, high resolution deposits at stand-off heights approaching 5mm. ...
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The chromatophores of cephalopods differ fundamentally from those of other animals: they are neuromuscular organs rather than cells and are not controlled hormonally. They constitute a unique motor system that operates upon the environment without applying any force to it. Each chromatophore organ comprises an elastic sacculus containing pigment, to which is attached a set of obliquely striated radial muscles, each with its nerves and glia. When excited the muscles contract, expanding the chromatophore; when they relax, energy stored in the elastic sacculus retracts it. The physiology and pharmacology of the chromatophore nerves and muscles of loliginid squids are discussed in detail. Attention is drawn to the multiple innervation of dorsal mantle chromatophores, of crucial importance in pattern generation. The size and density of the chromatophores varies according to habit and lifestyle. Differently coloured chromatophores are distributed precisely with respect to each other, and to reflecting structures beneath them. Some of the rules for establishing this exact arrangement have been elucidated by ontogenetic studies. The chromatophores are not innervated uniformly: specific nerve fibres innervate groups of chromatophores within the fixed, morphological array, producing ‘physiological units’ expressed as visible ‘chromatomotor fields’.
The static actuation of dielectric elastomer actuators: how does pre-stretch improve actuation?
  • G Kofod
G. Kofod, "The static actuation of dielectric elastomer actuators: how does pre-stretch improve actuation?" Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, vol. 41, no. 21, p. 215405, 2008.