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Investigation of Water Aeration Based on Digital Image Processing

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Abstract

This paper deals with physics of water aeration. Falling water flow produces air bubbles and water droplets mixture in the air-water interface. This mixture develops in the course of time. A new method of determination of amount of air entrained in water was presented. The method was based on digital image processing. Method allows determination of dynamics of air entrainment depending on several parameters of nozzle as well as on height of falling water flow.
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Due to the advances in computer technology and software, as well as the desire of humanity to use non-interference techniques with high accuracy in the collection of hydraulic data of water flow, today many researchers use digital image processing to estimate many parameters in hydraulic flow, sediment And the quality of water that in this study was considered necessary due to the importance of the use of non-interference methods and the importance of climate mixing area in hydraulic jump, to separate this area using imaging and image processing by matlab 2019a software that Using trial and error method, the best value for separating this area by the existing algorithm for pixels of gray images was 128, which according to other researchers, this threshold had the highest accuracy to separate the area containing air bubbles in the hydraulic jump. Therefore, it can be acknowledged that the image processing method has the necessary capability and accuracy to separate the air bubbles and is a good alternative to other methods of detecting the climate mixing zone can be.
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