Article

Correlation of Body Mass Index and Dental Caries in Patients Attending Baqai Dental College, Karachi, Pakistan

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  • Baqai Dental College, BMU
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... A study done by Wali A (2016) reported a statistically significant correlation between BMI and DMFT scores which may be due to the patients having irregular dietary pattern, lack of knowledge of oral hygiene and infrequent visits to dentist. 21 However, not all studies have found a positive correlation between BMI and dental caries; some studies suggest that there is no relationship between BMI and dental caries e.g. Macek and Mitola (2006) 22 , Sadeghi M (2007) 23 , Almerich-Torres T (2017) 11 and others showed an inverse relationship e.g. ...
Article
Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between body mass index, dental caries (DMFT), untreated dental caries (PUFA) and socioeconomic status in 12 to 15 year old school children. Material and methods: The study sample consisted of 800 children aged 12 to 15 years, who were selected from 8 schools located in the district-Panchkula (Haryana). Intraoral examination was done for assessment of dental caries by using DMFT index (WHO, 2013).The clinical manifestations of untreated dental caries were assessed visually by using the PUFA index (2010). Socioeconomic status of children was assessed by using Kuppuswami’s socioeconomic scale 2016. After one week, anthropometric measurements of children were taken to calculate the body mass index (BMI) of children. Results: Among 800 school children, 503 (62.9%) children had dental caries. The body mass index (BMI) of children was weakly correlated with DMFT (r=0.285) and PUFA (r=0.109) whereas average correlation was found between BMI and SES (r= 0.424). On applying chi-square test, a statistical significant correlation was found between BMI and DMFT (p<0.01), BMI and PUFA (p<0.01) and BMI and SES (p<0.01). SES of children was weakly correlated with DMFT (r= 0.216) but no correlation was found between SES and PUFA (r=0.052, p=0.145). Conclusion: The study concluded that a significant but weak positive correlation was seen between dental caries and BMI. A significantly positive correlation was found between PUFA and BMI. The severity of dental caries increased with increase in BMI. No correlation was found between PUFA and SES.
Article
Objectives This study aims to assess the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and dental caries experience among the patients attending the outpatient department of Tagore Dental College, Chennai, India. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study with a convenient sampling technique was employed in the outpatient department of Tagore Dental College, Chennai, India. Obesity was recorded by measuring the BMI. Dental caries experience was recorded using the World Health Organization’s recommended “decayed missing and filled teeth (DMFT)” method. Statistical analysis was performed using the Chi-square test and Student’s (unpaired) t -test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Dental caries prevalence was 81.9% with a mean DMFT score of 4.23 ± 3.56. Among the study participants, 69.4% were normal weight, 22.9% were overweight, and 6.8% were underweight. No significant association was found between gender with BMI and caries experience. Conclusion The prevalence of dental caries was high among the sampled population but the majority of the sampled population had normal BMI. To address public health concerns connected to dental caries, additional oral health prevention programs and policies should be implemented.
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