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Abstract

In the version of this Review originally published, the top heading in the first column of Fig. 2 was mistakenly written ‘Food poisoning’; it should have read ‘Food provisioning’. This has now been corrected.
CorreCtion
https://doi.org/10.1038/s41893-018-0104-2
Publisher Correction: Social-ecological outcomes of agricultural intensification
Laura Vang Rasmussen, Brendan Coolsaet, Adrian Martin, Ole Mertz, Unai Pascual   , Esteve Corbera   ,
Neil Dawson, Janet A. Fisher, Phil Franks and Casey M. Ryan 
Correction to: Nature Sustainability https://doi.org/10.1038/s41893-018-0070-8, published online 14 June 2018.
In the version of this Review originally published, the top heading in the first column of Fig. 2 was mistakenly written ‘Food poisoning’;
it should have read ‘Food provisioning’. This has now been corrected.
Published online: 27 June 2018
https://doi.org/10.1038/s41893-018-0104-2
Nature SuStaiNability | VOL 1 | JULY 2018 | 376 | www.nature.com/natsustain
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... However, the overall effect of these changes on biodiversity and other ecological indicators is still uncertain. On one hand, intensification is a main cause of biodiversity declines in rural areas (ECA, 2020) and it is associated with mainly negative impacts on ecosystem services (Rasmussen et al., 2018). On the other hand, rural biodiversity studies in Switzerland have found a positive correlation between biodiversity and ECAs, and in particular Q2 ECAs (Birrer et al., 2007;Knaus, 2017;Meichtry-Stier et al., 2014;Meier et al., 2021, p.74). ...
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