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Resilience of tropical forest and savanna: bridging theory and observation

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... Because 'forest' can be understood in physiognomic terms as any vegetation dominated by trees, the conflict between the use of the concepts forest and savanna can hardly be avoided (e.g. Ratnam et al. 2011;Torello-Raventos et al. 2013;Staal 2018). ...
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