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The Current State of Corporate Voice of the Consumer Programs: A Study of Organizational Listening Practices and Effectiveness

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While there is a rich literature on listening in interpersonal settings, studies of organizational listening have been comparatively scarce. A growing body of recent research, however, underscores the importance of how effectively (or poorly) organizations listen and attempt to respond to their respective publics and external stakeholders. This paper describes research focusing on organizational practices and effectiveness related to capturing, analyzing, disseminating, and utilizing the “Voice of the Consumer (VoC).” After reviewing literature regarding factors that may shape and influence VoC program effectiveness, the paper describes a two-phased program of research aimed at (a) identifying specific characteristics and practices that can/should be used to describe VoC programs and (b) assessing the current state of VoC programs with respect to overall effectiveness, and in relation to the preceding specific characteristics and practices. Results reveal that a majority of organizations have not yet achieved a desired level of VoC program effectiveness, and that most are better at capturing consumer feedback than they are at analyzing, disseminating, or utilizing it to improve products, services, and consumer experiences. Implications for theory-building and knowledge development, along with practical implications for organizational planning and management, are discussed.

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... Nos seduce escucharlos constantemente y entender sus anhelos y tendencias, porque queremos ser los primeros en satisfacerlos (Reporte Conciencia Celeste 2017, p.35).Al mismo tiempo que La Polar se centra en dos grupos específicamente entre los que se encuentran los clientes: "La Polar debe ser valorada y respetada por sus grupos de interés, partiendo por los colaboradores y clientes. Su satisfacción es el centro del negocio y debe trabajar de manera responsable para cumplir con sus expectativas y servirlos cada día mejor(La Polar, Memoria anual, 2017, p. 13).La eficacia en la construcción de una cultura de escucha del consumidor está estrechamente relacionada e impulsada por el mercado en el que se desempeña la empresa y la orientación al consumidor(Randall, 2020).Análisis de la existencia de una cultura de la escucha organizacional, desde los directivos en el sector multitiendas en Chile (67-84)Revista de Comunicación, 2021, vol. 20, N° 1. E-ISSN: 2227-1465 ...
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http://www.bookdepository.com/Qualitative-Methods-in-Business-Research-Paivi-Eriksson-Anne-Kovalainen/9781446273395?ref=grid-view https://wordery.com/qualitative-methods-in-business-research-paivi-eriksson-9781446273395
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This paper presents a general statistical methodology for the analysis of multivariate categorical data arising from observer reliability studies. The procedure essentially involves the construction of functions of the observed proportions which are directed at the extent to which the observers agree among themselves and the construction of test statistics for hypotheses involving these functions. Tests for interobserver bias are presented in terms of first-order marginal homogeneity and measures of interobserver agreement are developed as generalized kappa-type statistics. These procedures are illustrated with a clinical diagnosis example from the epidemiological literature.
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