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The Effect Of Daily Undulated Periodization As Compared To Linear Periodization In Strength Gains Of Collegiate Athletes

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... The manipulation of training variables (such as intensity, volume, type of exercise or type of training) are usually used to modulate these stressors from adaptive to restorative training phases [22]. There are a variety of periodization modes used within the literature, however the most popular training programs are linear and undulating periodization [23,24]. Linear periodization includes modulation of training variables over longer microcycles, whereas undulating periodization aims to modulate these variables during smaller microcycles [24]. ...
... Periodized strength training has been widely adopted by coaches to increase strength and power gains [8,9,17,18,23,25]. However, the literature is still uncertain whether this training strategy is actually effective in eliciting greater improvements in performance. ...
Article
First article to examine periodized stretch training.
... The manipulation of training variables (such as intensity, volume, type of exercise or type of training) are usually used to modulate these stressors from adaptive to restorative training phases [22]. There are a variety of periodization modes used within the literature, however the most popular training programs are linear and undulating periodization [23,24]. Linear periodization includes modulation of training variables over longer microcycles, whereas undulating periodization aims to modulate these variables during smaller microcycles [24]. ...
... Periodized strength training has been widely adopted by coaches to increase strength and power gains [8,9,17,18,23,25]. However, the literature is still uncertain whether this training strategy is actually effective in eliciting greater improvements in performance. ...
Article
Static stretching (SS) can increase joint range of motion (ROM), due to neural, morphological, and physio-psychological factors. Periodized training programs (PD) (e. g., strength, power) are adopted to induce greater adaptations while avoiding overtraining. However, the effectiveness of periodized stretch training adaptations are unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the effects of periodized and non-periodized (NP) stretching programs on flexibility, hamstrings stiffness and muscle performance. Sixteen gymnasts were allocated to either periodized or non-periodized SS training and tested pre- and post-8 weeks for countermovement jump height, hip flexors, hip extensors and dorsiflexors ROM, hamstrings stiffness and hamstrings and quadriceps peak torque. Both stretch training groups significantly and similarly increased hip extensor (33.2%), hip flexor (25.2%), and dorsiflexor (23.8%) ROM, hamstrings peak torque (7.9%) and jump height (8.1%) from pre - to post- training. Both groups decreased hamstrings stiffness across the last ten angles (32.1%). PD elicited consistently large magnitude flexibility effect size changes compared to small and moderate magnitude changes for the non-periodized. Therefore, 8-week PD and NP SS programs can decrease young gymnasts’ muscle-tendon stiffness and increase muscle performance. However, effect sizes indicate that PD stretch training was more advantageous to increasing flexibility and improving performance.
... Few studies have assessed the effect of LL and UL strengthpower scheme training approaches on athletic populations 13,14 , especially on soccer players. In addition, there is limited research about the LL and UL strength-power scheme training, especially concerning volume and intensity in soccer players 15 . ...
... groups in the current study. These results corroborate those found by Alvar, Wenner, and Dodd 15 in their study about collegiate athletes (Division 1), as well as those found by Christou, Smilios, Sotiropoulos, Volaklis, Pilianidis, Tokmakidis 25 , Enright, Morton, Iga, Drust 23 and Lopes et al. 16 in their study involving young soccer players. They found values close to those found in the present study in the 6-week cycle ( Table 2) by applying a LL periodization approach (5 weeks, 3 sets of 8 repetitions, 60-80 % of 1RM/, subsequently, another 5 weeks, 4 sets of 6 repetitions and 85 % of 1RM). ...
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Abstract –– Purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of linear and undulating strength-power training scheme on the repeated sprint ability (RSA) and lower body strength of soccer players. Method: Twenty soccer players (under-20 category) were split into 2 groups: the linear load (LL, n=10) and the undulating load (UL, n=10). In the commencement and at the end of the 6-week pre-season period, the RSA test (6 x 35m) and the 1RM parallel squat test (1RMsquat) were conducted. The LL and UL performed the same type and number of sessions. The training stimulus in the strength training was different between LL (Weeks 1 and 2 = Muscular Endurance; Weeks 3 and 4 = Strength; Weeks 5 and 6 = Power) and UL (daily load variation in the same week). Results: A improvement in RSAmean and 1RMsquat was detected in LL and in UL. No significant difference was noted between LL vs UL for all variables. Conclusion: Both groups improved maximal muscle strength in parallel back squat and RSA. UL induced a greater gain in RSA. Keywords: soccer; strength; speed; athletic training.
... The superiority of the DUP training program in increasing muscle strength of the upper and lower limbs has also been frequently reported in other studies [22,23] that may be related to the unique characteristics of DUP training-induced adaptation at the level of the neuromuscular junction, spinal cord and/or motor cortex. For instance, in the current study, we found that EMG amplitude rate of increase during maximal isometric contraction of the quadriceps muscle after the DUP training program was significantly larger than that observed after the LP training program. ...
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Background: ‪The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 9 weeks’ resistance training utilizing a daily undulating periodization (DUP) program versus a linear periodization (LP) program on concentric and isometric muscle strength and neuromuscular function of the quadriceps muscle. Material and methods: ‪30 male subjects (age = 21.7 ±2.5 yr, body mass = 71.4 ±11.9 kg, height =1.77 ±0.09 m) participated in the study. Subjects were randomly divided into DUP and LP training groups. Both the DUP and LP training group performed leg press exercise 3 times per week. Volume and intensity were equated for each training program. However, the periodization type was different between the two groups. Additionally, the maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MIVC) of the quadriceps muscle and the associated electromyography (EMG) activity were recorded before and after 9 weeks of the DUP and LP training programs. Results: ‪The DUP training program resulted in a greater increase (50.1% ±10.1) in quadriceps isometric strength compared with the LP training program (35.5% ±7.3; F = 7.6, p < 0.025). Accordingly, EMG activity of the quadriceps muscle after 9 weeks of the DUP training program was significantly larger than that observed after the LP training model (F = 7.5, p < 0.05). Conclusions: ‪Resistance training using a DUP program is more effective than a LP program to elicit neuromuscular activity and muscle strength.
... Yet, despite these findings, the study by Swinton and colleagues (21) found that powerlifting athletes are using the wave periodization methods for strength training. Numerous studies (1,6,16,18,23) have been carried out to elucidate the differences between the effects of the traditional and wave models of periodized RT. These studies demonstrate a trend towards improved performance when using wave periodization compared to linear periodization. ...
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João GA, Evangelista AL, Gomes JH, Charro MA, Bocalini D, Cardozo D, Simão R, Figueira Júnior A, Silva DCS. Effect of 16 Weeks of Periodized Resistance Training on Strength Gains of Powerlifting Athletes. JEPonline 2014;17(3):102-109. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 16 wks of periodized resistance training on strength gains of 9 elite powerlifting athletes (men, 34.5 ± 5.0 yrs, 175.2 ± 7.8 cm, 94 4 ± 16.7 kg). The levels of strength ratings were determined by the 1RM test and divided into 5 stages (AS): AS1-initial assessment, before the start of periodized training; AS2-end of 1st 4-wk mesocycle and beginning of 2nd mesocycle; AS3-end of 2nd 4-wk mesocycle and beginning of 3rd mesocycle; AS4-end of 3rd mesocycle and beginning of 4th mesocycle; AS5-end of 4th 4-wk mesocycle. Squat, bench press, and deadlift exercises were used to measure muscle strength. There was a significant increase in strength in all exercises and each assessment compared to the pre-training values (P≤0.05). After 16 wks of training, there was a 30Δ% increase in bench press, 33Δ% for squat, and 76.9Δ% for deadlift exercise compared to pre-training values. Thus, the results of this study indicate that linear periodization training applied in powerlifting athletes is an efficient method to increase muscular strength.
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