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Folic Acid Supplementation: A Review of the Known Advantages and Risks

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Abstract

Folate is required for metabolic processes and neural development. The aim of this paper was to review the effects of folic acid supplementation before and throughout pregnancy on fetal development, summarize research needs with a focus on studying the effects of correct dosage folic acid. Methods: Related publications were reviewed to determine and quantify associations of maternal use of folic acid before conception and during pregnancy as risk factor for Neural Tube Defects (NTD), Orofacial Clefts, ischemic heart diseases, Unmetabolised folic acid, Masking of B12 Deficiency Anemia and cancer. Evidence on maternal drug use before conception and during pregnancy as risk factor for developmental defect from epidemiological studies is still very limited. This review showed that a high prevalence of malformations and diseases that affect fetus could be related to the mother folic acid supplementation before and during pregnancy. Challenges in global prevalence estimation include quality of surveillance methods, geographic and socioeconomic factors, availability and use of folic acid, racial-ethnic and genetic factors, and limitations in education and access to care. For primary prevention of NTD in women with no prior affected pregnancy, 0.4 mg daily dose of folic acid was recommended and 4.0 mg daily dose was effective in preventing NTD in women with a prior affected pregnancy. Also Maternal supplementation in early pregnancy reduces the risk of oral cleft in infants, evidence from the literature serve to reassure women planning a pregnancy to consume folic acid during the periconception period to protect against oral clefts. Several studies have confirmed that folic acid supplementation before pregnancy was associated with a reduced risk of ischemic heart diseases, lower dietary folate intake during pregnancy was associated with increased risk. Folic acid may prevent or promote cancer development and progression depending on the timing of intervention In conclusion and based on the evidence evaluated, caution regarding under and/or over folic acid supplementation is warranted.
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... In adults, the process of lymphopoiesis occurs in the bone marrow and myriad growth factors and cytokines are involved in the intricate process [13,14]. In addition to the various growth factors and cytokines, folic acid (generically also known as folate or folacin) also plays an important role [15,16]. Folic acid is water soluble, heat labile B-complex vitamin of dietary origin with important function in the body. ...
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oral disease, a relevant public health problem, is considered a common disease of many people. In this respect, vitamins may be a modifying factor in the progression and healing of the oral diseases and promoting oral and dental health. Vitamins have been recommended as nutrients for prevention and treatment of some pathological conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer and obesity. Thus, an approach to determine how the different vitamin types could improve oral and dental health is necessary to further understanding of the potential benefits and risks of vitamins supplementation use. For this review of English-written literature which included researches on the relationship of each vitamin with oral and dental health, was conducted.
... There is some suggestive evidence for a possible role of folic acid in prevention of this defect. (27,28) The role of nutrition in periodontology has been studied extensively, and recent studies on the interactions between nutrition, host defense, and infection have found a correlation between nutrition and the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Vitamin B-complex supplementation has also demonstrated positive effects on wound healing after periodontal surgery. ...
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Full-text available
oral disease, a relevant public health problem, is considered a common disease of many people. In this respect, vitamins may be a modifying factor in the progression and healing of the oral diseases and promoting oral and dental health. Vitamins have been recommended as nutrients for prevention and treatment of some pathological conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer and obesity. Thus, an approach to determine how the different vitamin types could improve oral and dental health is necessary to further understanding of the potential benefits and risks of vitamins supplementation use. For this review of English-written literature which included researches on the relationship of each vitamin with oral and dental health, was conducted.
... There is some suggestive evidence for a possible role of folic acid in prevention of this defect. (27,28) The role of nutrition in periodontology has been studied extensively, and recent studies on the interactions between nutrition, host defense, and infection have found a correlation between nutrition and the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Vitamin B-complex supplementation has also demonstrated positive effects on wound healing after periodontal surgery. ...
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Abstract: oral disease, a relevant public health problem, is considered a common disease of many people. In this respect, vitamins may be a modifying factor in the progression and healing of the oral diseases and promoting oral and dental health. Vitamins have been recommended as nutrients for prevention and treatment of some pathological conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer and obesity. Thus, an approach to determine how the different vitamin types could improve oral and dental health is necessary to further understanding of the potential benefits and risks of vitamins supplementation use. For this review of English-written literature which included researches on the relationship of each vitamin with oral and dental health, was conducted. Keywords: vitamin; gingivitis; oral health; periodontitis; caries. Introduction
... There is some suggestive evidence for a possible role of folic acid in prevention of this defect. (27,28) The role of nutrition in periodontology has been studied extensively, and recent studies on the interactions between nutrition, host defense, and infection have found a correlation between nutrition and the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Vitamin B-complex supplementation has also demonstrated positive effects on wound healing after periodontal surgery. ...
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Full-text available
oral disease, a relevant public health problem, is considered a common disease of many people. In this respect, vitamins may be a modifying factor in the progression and healing of the oral diseases and promoting oral and dental health. Vitamins have been recommended as nutrients for prevention and treatment of some pathological conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer and obesity. Thus, an approach to determine how the different vitamin types could improve oral and dental health is necessary to further understanding of the potential benefits and risks of vitamins supplementation use. For this review of English-written literature which included researches on the relationship of each vitamin with oral and dental health, was conducted.
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