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Elite Youth Cycling

Authors:

Abstract

Elite Youth Cycling showcases the latest cutting-edge research in youth cycling performance. Covering both endurance and sprint cycling events, the book explores the effect of cycling on the maturation of the body, suggests long-term training and nutritional strategies for young athletes, and discusses issues such as long-term athlete health, and body image in endurance cyclists. The book is vital reading for any physiologist, psychologist, strength and conditioning coach or sport therapist working with young cyclists, and any academic researching youth sport and the development of young athletes.
July 2018
Hb: 978-1-138-08684-5 | £105.00
eBook: 978-1-315-11077-6
TABLE OF CONTENTS:
1. Muscle and Bone Development; Klaus Wirth,
Christoph Mickel, Hagen Hartmann, and Michael
Keiner
2. Cardiopulmonary Development; Tim Takken and
Brynmor C. Breese
3. Aerobic and Anaerobic Metabolism; Melitta A.
McNarry and Alan R. Barker
4. Performance Assessment in Laboratory and Field
Conditions ; Chris Abbiss, Jeremiah Peiffer, and Paolo
Menaspà 5. Longitudinal Training Strategies ; Paolo
Menaspà and Chris R. Abbiss
6. Concurrent Strength Training; Bent R. Rønnestad
7. Training with Power Meters; Alfred Nimmerichter
8. Overuse and injury prevention; Michael Cassel,
Josefine Stoll, Monique Schugardt, and Frank Mayer
9. Nutritional Needs and Ergogenic Aids ; Michael J.
Saunders and Daniel A. Baur
10. Psychological and Behavioral Determinants of
Sport Participation and Performance in the Young
Athlete ; John S. Raglin, Kelzie E. Beebe, and Dominic
Micklewright
11. Motivation in Youth Sports; Michael Methlagl and
Friederike Michlmayr
12. Goal Setting and Motivation ; Friederike
Michlmayr and Michael Methlagl
Coming soon from Routledge!
Elite Youth Cycling
Edited by Alfred Nimmerichter
Series: Routledge Research in Paediatric Sport and Exercise
Science
Elite Youth Cycling showcases the latest cutting-edge
research in youth cycling performance. Covering both
endurance and sprint cycling events, the book explores
the effect of cycling on the maturation of the body,
suggests long-term training and nutritional strategies for
young athletes, and discusses issues such as long-term
athlete health, and body image in endurance cyclists.
The book is vital reading for any physiologist, psychologist,
strength and conditioning coach or sport therapist working
with young cyclists, and any academic researching youth
sport and the development of young athletes.
Hb: 978-1-138-08684-5 | £105.00
For more details, or to request a copy for review, please contact: Megan A. Smith, Editorial
Assistant, Megan.A.Smith@taylorandfrancis.com
For more information visit:
www.routledge.com/9781138086845
... Current knowledge about the different competition characteristics and athletic profiles of cyclists is mainly based upon information from adult and junior professional athletes. 10 In literature, the morphological characteristics of professional male cyclists are regularly investigated in relation to their physiological profile and role in competition. 11 The body types of the cycling disciplines vary between body length and body composition (muscularity and fat percentage). ...
... Peter Sagan, Cadel Evans, Mark Cavendish, Greg van Avermaet). 10 However, further research is needed to investigate the benefits of applying the "specialized sampling" strategy within cycling. Especially the need for high focus on the primary sport domain at a young age is questionable. ...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to document the athletic profiles of adolescent and young adult high performance cycling athletes and to investigate to what extent different cycling disciplines can be discriminated from each other based on a generic test battery. A total of 243 adolescent (12.0-15.99 y) and 63 young adult (>¼16 y) male cyclists from road cycling, track cycling, cyclo-cross, and mountain bike (MTB) participated in the study. All participants performed four anthropometric, five physical, three motor coordination, and two cycling-specific tests. Using discriminant analyses, the young adult athletes could be correctly classified to their discipline for 80.7%. Track cyclists outperformed the other disciplines in explosive and coordinative skills while for cyclo-cross, and particularly MTB, the performance on the shuttle bike test seemed to be a distinctive variable. Road cyclists however, showed a significant overlap in performance characteristics with the other disciplines. In spite of the less pronounced discriminative character in the adolescent cycling population (51.0%), the discriminative characteristics are in line with the results of the young adults. This study allows to orient cyclists towards their best-fitted discipline in young adulthood. The relevance of these findings for coaches, experts and federations with respect to early/late specialization, and talent orientation are discussed.
Article
This study investigated the physiological, performance and training characteristics of U23 cyclists and assessed the requirements of stepping up to the elite/international ranks. Twenty highly trained U23 cyclists (age, 22.1 ± 0.8 years; body mass, 69.1 ± 6.8 kg; VO2max, 76.1 ± 3.9 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) participated in this study. The cyclists were a posteriori divided into two groups based on whether or not they stepped up to elite/international level cycling (U23ELITE vs. U23NON-ELITE). Physiological, performance and training and racing characteristics were determined and compared between groups. U23ELITE demonstrated higher absolute peak power output (p = .016), 2 min (p = .026) 5 min (p = .042) and 12 min (p ≤ .001) power output as well as higher absolute critical power (p = .002). Further, U23ELITE recorded more accumulated hours (p ≤ .001), covered distance (p ≤ .001), climbing metres (p ≤ .001), total sessions (p ≤ .001), total work (p ≤ .001) and scored more UCI points (p ≤ .001). These findings indicate that U23ELITE substantially differed from U23NON-ELITE regarding physiological, performance and training and racing characteristics derived from laboratory and field. These variables should be considered by practitioners supporting young cyclists throughout their development towards the elite/international ranks.
Article
The aim of this study was to analyze climbing performance across two editions of a professional multistage race, and assess the influence of climb category, prior workload, and intensity measures on climbing performance in U23 and professional cyclists. Nine U23 cyclists (age 20.8 ± 0.9 years) and 8 professional cyclists (28.1 ± 3.2 years) participated in this study. Data were divided into four types: overall race performance, climb category, climbing performance metrics (power output, ascent velocity, speed), and workload and intensity measures. Differences in performance metrics and workload and intensity measures between groups were investigated. Power output , ascent velocity, speed were higher in professionals than U23 cyclists for Cat 1 and Cat 2 (p ≤ 0.001-0.016). Workload and intensity measures (Work total , Work total •km-1 , Elevation gain , eTRIMP and eTRIMP•km-1) were higher in U23 compared to professionals (p = 0.002-0.014). Climbing performance metrics were significantly predicted by prior workload and intensity measures for Cat 1 and 2 (R 2 = 0.27-0.89, p ≤ 0.001-0.030) but not Cat 3. These findings reveal that climbing performance in professional road cycling is influenced by climb categorization as well as prior workload and intensity measures. Combined, these findings suggest that Cat 1 and 2 climbing performance could be predicted from workload and intensity measures.
Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the power profile, internal and external workloads, and racing performance between U23 and professional cyclists and between varying rider types across 2 editions of a professional multistage race. Methods: Nine U23 cyclists from a Union Cycliste Internationale "Continental Team" (age 20.8 [0.9] y; body mass 71.2 [6.3] kg) and 8 professional cyclists (28.1 [3.2] y; 63.0 [4.6] kg) participated in this study. Rider types were defined as all-rounders, general classification (GC) riders, and domestiques. Data were collected during 2 editions of a 5-day professional multistage race and split into the following 4 categories: power profile, external and internal workloads, and race performance. Results: The professional group, including domestiques and GC riders, recorded higher relative power profile values after certain amounts of total work (1000-3000 kJ) than the U23 group or all-rounders (P ≤ .001-.049). No significant differences were found for external workload measures between U23 and professional cyclists, nor among rider types. Internal workloads were higher in U23 cyclists and all-rounders (P ≤ .001-.043) compared with professionals, domestiques, and GC riders, respectively. The power profile significantly predicted percentage general classification and Union Cycliste Internationale points (R2 = .90-.99), whereas external and internal workloads did not. Conclusion: These findings reveal that the power profile represents a practical tool to discriminate between professionals and U23 cyclists as well as rider types. The power profile after 1000 to 3000 kJ of total work could be used by practitioners to evaluate the readiness of U23 cyclists to move into the professional ranks, as well as differentiate between rider types.
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