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Potencjał zmiany. Rezultaty działania ruchu społecznego na przykładzie aktywizmu LGBT* w Polsce?/ Potential for Change. Social Movement Outcomes by Example of LGBT* Movement in Poland (PL only)

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Dostępna w Repozytorium UMK: https://repozytorium.umk.pl/bitstream/handle/item/5830/12.%20bielska%20potencja%C5%82%20zmiany%20ruch%20LGBT%20w%20Polsce.pdf?sequence=4 Wprowadzenie / 9 Rozdział 1. Program badawczy / 24 Konteksty teoretyczno-metodologiczne / 24 Socjologiczne zaangażowanie / 27 Cele i pytania badawcze / 34 Metody i techniki badawcze oraz uzasadnienie ich zastosowania / 35 Dobór próby / 38 Rozdział 2. Kłir, czyli odmieniec. Polska socjologia seksualności / 44 Ruch społeczny LGBT* w naukach społecznych i humanistycznych / 44 Powiązanie analiz społecznych i aktywizmu / 44 Nauki humanistyczne i społeczne w Polsce a tematyka LGBT* / 54 Historia ruchu LGBT* w Polsce – próba rekonstrukcji / 58 Dylematy, kontrowersje, białe plamy – ile wiemy, a czego nie wiemy o polskim ruchu osób nieheteronormatywnych / 68 Rozdział 3. Ruch osób nieheteronormatywnych jako ruch społeczny / 77 Socjologiczna refleksja na temat ruchów społecznych jako odbicie przemian społeczeństw nowoczesnych i ponowoczesnych / 77 Teorie ruchów społecznych – konteksty i typologie / 77 Teorie zachowań zbiorowych i teorie mobilizacji zasobów / 85 Specyfika nowych ruchów społecznych jako aktorów politycznych / 92 Ujęcia współczesne / 100 Baza społeczna ruchów społecznych – problematyczne klasy społeczne / 105 Rozdział 4. Siła w ruchu. Ruchy społeczne a modele zmian społecznych / 110 Zmiany dyfuzyjne, ewolucyjne czy konfliktowe? / 110 Rezultaty działania, czyli w jaki sposób odpowiedzieć na pytanie o potencjał wywołania zmian przez ruch społeczny? / 116 Rozdział 5. Dynamiczna sieć – krótka empiryczna monografia ruchu / 133 Autodefinicja ruchu/ruchów / 133 Historia i pamięć / 141 Tożsamość zbiorowa / 154 Podziały / 158 Połączenia / 164 Zasoby / 169 Przeciwnicy / 176 Rozdział 6. Perspektywa badanych a teorie: rezultaty działania ruchu społecznego / 183 Cele / 183 Strategie działania / 201 Możliwości / 208 Rezultaty / 221 Zakończenie / 234 Słowniczek / 244 Załącznik 1: Lista organizacji LGBTQ (rok 2015) / 246 Załącznik 2: Scenariusz IDI z przedstawiciel(k)ami ruchu / 251 Załącznik 3: Scenariusz IDI z przeciwni(cz)kami ruchu / 254 Załącznik 4: Arkusz informacyjny badania / 257 Załącznik 5: List rekomendacyjny / 258 Bibliografia / 259 Indeks pojęć / 285
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Ritualized/institutionalized homosexuality in New Guinea is viewed as a mechanism of social control that operates to perpetuate a system of inequality based on sex and age. Specifies some of the ways in which ritualized homosexuality actually subordinates and controls women and young men.-from Author
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Moments of madness—when “all is possible”—recur persistently in the history of social movements. In such turbulent points of history, writes Aristide Zolberg, “the wall between the instrumental and the expressive collapses.” “Politics bursts its bounds to invade all of life” and “political animals somehow transcend their fate” (1972: 183). Such moments are unsettling and often leave even participants disillusioned—not to mention elites and political authorities. But they may be “necessary for the political transformation of societies,” writes Zolberg, for they are the source of the new actors, the audiences and the force to break through the crust of convention (1972: 206). In Kafka’s parable: “Leopards break into the temple and drink to the dregs what is in the sacrificial pitchers; this is repeated over and over again; finally it can be calculated in advance, and it becomes a part of the ceremony.”
Article
This article focuses on the national and transnational strategies of five European Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender civil society organizations (CSOs) pressing for equality and non-discrimination. We present three modes of interaction between CSOs and their political environment. The first mode we label ‘morality politics’. Arcigay in Italy and the Campaign against Homophobia in Poland are seemingly locked in this mode because they are confronted with a hostile and organized opposition, both in terms of public opinion and elite opinion. A second mode of interaction we label an ‘incremental change’ mode and is the strategy pursued by Stonewall in the United Kingdom and the Hatter Society in Hungary, marked by discreet elite level lobbying. Finally, we introduce a third mode of interaction we label ‘high-profile politics’. This mode is marked by highly visible public events, coalition seeking, cooperation with government, and transnational activity at the European level and abroad. This is a strategy possible by CSOs where there is a high degree of public support for equality and minimal partisan or religious opposition to the goals of the movement. The Dutch COC has been pursuing this ‘high-profile politics’ mode of interaction in their political environment over the past few years.