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Abstract

Samenvatting Door de toevloed aan gratis games met in-game aankopen en maandelijkse abonnees wordt het steeds belangrijker om spelers bij een bepaalde game te houden. Deze interviewstudie dient als een eerste verkenning van stop- of cessatiegedrag bij jonge spelers van online digitale games. Hieruit blijkt dat niet-ingeloste startmotivaties, negatieve ervaringen tijdens het spelen, en vrienden of familie ervoor zorgen dat gamers stoppen met spelen.
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