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Privacy Concerns and Behavior of Pokémon Go Players in Germany

Chapter

Privacy Concerns and Behavior of Pokémon Go Players in Germany

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Abstract

We investigate privacy concerns and the privacy behavior of users of the AR smartphone game Pokémon Go. Pokémon Go accesses several functionalities of the smartphone and, in turn, collects a plethora of data of its users. For assessing the privacy concerns, we conduct an online study in Germany with 683 users of the game. The results indicate that the majority of the active players are concerned about the privacy practices of companies. This result hints towards the existence of a cognitive dissonance, i.e. the privacy paradox. Since this result is common in the privacy literature, we complement the first study with a second one with 199 users, which aims to assess the behavior of users with regard to which measures they undertake for protecting their privacy. The results are highly mixed and dependent on the measure, i.e. relatively many participants use privacy-preserving measures when interacting with their smartphone. This implies that many users know about risks and might take actions to protect their privacy, but deliberately trade-off their information privacy for the utility generated by playing the game.

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... Pokémon Go is used as a case for testing the proposition since the Pokémon brand is very strong and well known among people. Besides specific privacy concerns associated with Pokémon Go [7,8], research indicates that there are major privacy issues with MAR apps in general [9,10] and that individuals are concerned about their privacy when using AR [11][12][13]. We gathered 418 complete questionnaires from active players of the game in an online survey. ...
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Information privacy refers to the desire of individuals to control or have some influence over data about themselves. Advances in information technology have raised concerns about information privacy and its impacts, and have motivated Information Systems researchers to explore information privacy issues, including technical solutions to address these concerns. In this paper, we inform researchers about the current state of information privacy research in IS through a critical analysis of the IS literature that considers information privacy as a key construct. The review of the literature reveals that information privacy is a multilevel concept, but rarely studied as such. We also find that information privacy research has been heavily reliant on studentbased and USA-centric samples, which results in findings of limited generalizability. Information privacy research focuses on explaining and predicting theoretical contributions, with few studies in journal articles focusing on design and action contributions. We recommend that future research should consider different levels of analysis as well as multilevel effects of information privacy. We illustrate this with a multilevel framework for information privacy concerns. We call for research on information privacy to use a broader diversity of sampling populations, and for more design and action information privacy research to be published in journal articles that can result in IT artifacts for protection or control of information privacy.
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While privacy is a highly cherished value, few would argue with the notion that absolute privacy is unattainable. Individuals make choices in which they surrender a certain degree of privacy in exchange for outcomes that are perceived to be worth the risk of information disclosure. This research attempts to better understand the delicate balance between privacy risk beliefs and confidence and enticement beliefs that influence the intention to provide personal information necessary to conduct transactions on the Internet. A theoretical model that incorporated contrary factors representing elements of a privacy calculus was tested using data gathered from 369 respondents. Structural equations modeling (SEM) using LISREL validated the instrument and the proposed model. The results suggest that although Internet privacy concerns inhibit e-commerce transactions, the cumulative influence of Internet trust and personal Internet interest are important factors that can outweigh privacy risk perceptions in the decision to disclose personal information when an individual uses the Internet. These findings provide empirical support for an extended privacy calculus model.
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Generational differences are seen as the cause of wide shifts in our ability to engage with technologies and the concept of the digital native has gained popularity in certain areas of policy and practice. This paper provides evidence, through the analysis of a nationally representative survey in the UK, that generation is only one of the predictors of advanced interaction with the Internet. Breadth of use, experience, gender and educational levels are also important, indeed in some cases more important than generational differences, in explaining the extent to which people can be defined as a digital native. The evidence provided suggests that it is possible for adults to become digital natives, especially in the area of learning, by acquiring skills and experience in interacting with information and communication technologies. This paper argues that we often erroneously presume a gap between educators and students and that if such a gap does exist, it is definitely possible to close it.
Article
The role and feasibility of consumer's privacy and rationality in individual decision making is discussed. Theoretical and empirical approaches aimed at investgating the drivers and apparent inconsistencies of privacy decision making and behavior are presented. Theoritical groundings to critique the assumption of rationality in privacy decision making are also presented. An online survey for testing the rationality by analyzins individual knowledge, behavior and psychological deviations from rationality is also presented.
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